3 Questions Before Implementing Any Mobile Solution

I often get super excited when I see other businesses doing cool and innovative things in mobile. You read an article here, a blog post there, see a speaker at a conference … It makes me excited … I go back to review my notes and identify all of the things I want to execute. It’s usually a long list that has some low-hanging fruit and some things that are probably not going to happen any time soon …

I often get super excited when I see other businesses doing cool and innovative things in mobile.

You read an article here, a blog post there, see a speaker at a conference …

It makes me excited …

I go back to review my notes and identify all of the things I want to execute.

It’s usually a long list that has some low-hanging fruit and some things that are probably not going to happen any time soon …

Does this happen to you?

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked to figure out how to incorporate a new technology into a strategy the minute the news breaks, just because someone in a C-level position read a press release.

I then realize how easy it is as a marketer to get hung up on shiny objects, such as Google Glass, and start plotting how to leverage it moving forward. BUT, then I stop myself and ask myself three important questions.

These questions help me determine how, and more importantly when, to move forward with a new mobile opportunity.

  • What problem is this solving? This could be a customer problem or even an internal operational problem.
  • How will using this mobile solution make my customer’s life (or employee’s life) better?
  • How and how soon will it contribute to the businesses bottom line?

You see, at the end of the day I call myself a revenue marketer.

Leveraging mobile solutions that either solve a problem or make your customer’s life better usually end up in increased revenue.

This means the mobile solution you implement may not be super flashy or sexy, but it gets the job done.

That’s why so many brands still heavily rely on SMS as their mobile marketing workhorse. It just works.

So, I challenge you to ask yourself these three questions when you’re approached with an opportunity that sounds cool and innovative.

Just because someone higher up than you recommends it doesn’t mean it’s the right solution.

Innovation is relative.

Solve a problem. Make your customer’s life better. Make more money.

Have you ever had this challenge? If so, we’d love to hear about how you got through it.

4 Tips to Get in the Mobile Mindset

We’ve talked about SMS, mobile websites and mobile email. But, as you may know, those are just tools to get your job of marketing your business done. Yes, building these into your strategy are the core foundations of mobile success, but mobile is more than technology … Mobile is about your customer. Now, I’m not here to shout out stats, because I’ve provided those before. And, frankly, you’re here … so you know adding mobile to your business is critical. Your customers are mobile … therefore, your business needs to be.

We’ve talked about SMS, mobile websites and mobile email. But, as you may know, those are just tools to get your job of marketing your business done.

Yes, building these into your strategy are the core foundations of mobile success, but mobile is more than technology …

Mobile is about your customer.

Now, I’m not here to shout out stats, because I’ve provided those before. And, frankly, you’re here … so you know adding mobile to your business is critical.

Your customers are mobile … therefore, your business needs to be.

Now, before you go and plan your strategy and determine the appropriate tactics to reach your goals, you need to put yourself in the mobile mindset.

I recently attended Mobile Marketer‘s Mobile FirstLook event in New York in which many brands, such as Coca-Cola, Sephora, MillerCoors, Nissan and JetBlue discussed their strategies.

I noticed that all of these individuals work within their entire organization to help them think differently about the mobile opportunity.

Making sure you have the mobile mindset and your organization is on board and you’re more likely to succeed.

Here are four tips I learned from the top brands on getting in the mobile mindset:

1. Think about your mobile opportunity across your organization.

Mobile isn’t just about marketing. Can mobile enable your sales team to sell more effectively? Can mobile optimize tasks to save time? Can mobile save you money by cutting down on transaction fees?

Before you think SMS, QR Codes or apps, think “How can mobile add value to all of the other parts of my organization?”

2. Stop making it complicated.

Believe me, I know it’s super complex and overwhelming to keep up with the latest and greatest technologies.

Coca-Cola focuses on six aspects of its mobile programs. Those are the six that work for THEIR business. They may not be the same for your business, but you can’t worry about ALL the possibilities of mobile. Focus on the handful of things that will most impact your business.

3. Work with the right partners. Ones you can trust.

Luckily, we don’t have to do all of this alone. In fact, if you try you’re more likely to get frustrated and give up. Aligning yourself with the right strategic partners and technology partners is important.

Again, every business is different, so you need to make sure that the workflow and process of your partners matches the style of your business. You most likely want to enjoy working with them, too. Make sure personalities mesh well.

Finally, I don’t care how big your company is. Mobile is no longer a “nice to have.” No matter the size of your business, you can find someone who knows more than you do and who is able to offer services.

4. Stop waiting.

This was probably the most powerful statement of all. So simple, but it needed to be said.

With technology advancing so fast, some businesses find themselves waiting for the next great thing in order to start. Guess what? When you do that … you never start.

Listen, nobody is going to do it for you … it’s on you to dive in and get the process started.

If you’re dilly-dallying and finding excuses to wait just a little bit longer … quit complaining and start taking action.

Yes, you’re going to make mistakes, and that’s fine. But what you learn from those mistakes will be an important part of your growth.

Starting now is the only way you’re going to learn what works for YOUR business.

5 Pillars of the Mobile Marketing Industry

All emerging industries reach a point where their ecosystem’s members find common and fundamental concepts that help them organize their thoughts and actions in order to ensure the long-term growth and success of their businesses. For mobile marketing, those fundamentals have emerged and can be boiled down to five verbs: promote, measure, educate, guide and protect.

All emerging industries reach a point where their ecosystem’s members find common and fundamental concepts that help them organize their thoughts and actions in order to ensure the long-term growth and success of their businesses. For mobile marketing, those fundamentals have emerged and can be boiled down to five verbs: promote, measure, educate, guide and protect.

In September, the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) refined its messaging along these five pillars to improve its ability to efficiently communicate with the market and to forge forward with its mission to help foster a growing and sustainable mobile marketing industry. The following list highlights the measurable objectives of each of these pillars:

  • Promote. Promote mobile marketing best practices, standards, thought-leadership and industry leaders (e.g., brands, agencies, media companies, application providers, etc.) to foster innovation and industry development.
  • Educate. Provide structured, evidence-based curriculum to educate brands, agencies and consumers about the full scale and scope of mobile marketing practices to highlight their advantages and benefits and to ensure that all players can develop a common understanding of each other’s goals and motivations so that they may efficiently and effectively co-create value between them for their mutual benefit.
  • Measure. As we enter into the “digital age,” where all engagements, moods, preferences, interests and intentions can be digitally imprinted, the key to successful mutual value creation between marketers and consumers will be achieved through the teasing out of insights and knowledge from the vast amounts of data that’s being managed by consumers and marketers alike. In today’s digital world, consumers have as much information as marketers; both need to measure their activities (e.g., total spend in industry, effectiveness of one medium versus another to accomplish one’s goals) to ensure they’re optimizing their time, energy and money.
  • Guide. We all need guidance. By continuing to amass thought-leadership, best practices and self-regulatory codes of conduct, mobile marketers can continue to foster and grow the industry.
  • Protect. Protect consumers and your businesses. All mobile marketers need to pay special attention to the needs of each constituent in the marketplace, and ensure an even playing field for all to help maximize public and industry confidence in mobile marketing, lower barriers to entry and minimize noneconomic costs of doing business.

More than words
These five pillars aren’t just shibboleths. They’re designed to provide the mobile marketing industry with actionable concepts that are key for maintaining growth.

Here’s a real-world example: A recent MMA survey of U.S. advertisers and ad agencies shows strong confidence in mobile marketing’s reach and effectiveness — so much so that they plan to increase their spending 124 percent to more than $5.4 billion by the end of 2011. This projected increase reflects advertiser and agency plans to shift their budgets out of media such as print and outdoor and into the mobile channel.

The “measure” pillar plays a key role by providing the confidence that in turn enables this kind of growth. It’s easier for brands and agencies to justify those dramatic increases and strategy shifts when they have access to independent, primary analytics showing consumer interest in and adoption of mobile services.

But measurement is possible only when everyone is using the same baselines and definitions. The MMA recently worked with the Interactive Advertising Bureau to define what constitutes a mobile ad impression.

Another example of measurement is via independent research. An April 2010 survey conducted by the MMA and one of its official research partners, Luth Research, found that nearly one in four U.S. adult consumers uses mobile location services. Nearly half of those who noticed any ads while using location-based services took at least some action, indicating that consumers respond well to ads through location-based services. That’s the kind of actionable intelligence that brands and agencies need to make the most of the mobile opportunity.

The “promote” pillar plays an equally important role in helping drive industry growth. Case studies, for example, explain how and why certain campaigns are highly successful. This information gives brands and agencies the actionable insights necessary to develop and execute their own strategies, and it complements “measure” by providing additional confidence that the mobile channel will put their marketing budget to highly effective use.

Effectiveness depends partly on the actions of the industry as a whole. That’s where the “educate” pillar comes in. The MMA’s certification program is designed to educate marketing professionals about how to use the mobile channel effectively and appropriately.

That process starts with protecting the consumer experience and the efficiency of the market’s systems so that all players can grow their businesses in a sustainable fashion. Industry-standard guidelines such as the MMA’s “U.S. Consumer Best Practices” and “Code of Conduct for Mobile Marketing” are part of the “guide” pillar, which enables the self-regulation that helps grow the mobile opportunity.

The MMA’s role as guide includes providing a framework so that the mobile industry can create these kinds of documents, which ensure that brands, agencies, developers, carriers and other ecosystem members are all on the same page — and moving forward.

Promote, measure, educate, guide and protect. Five verbs that provide focus and momentum to the ongoing development of a burgeoning industry. Everyone can contribute, you just have to find the area that excites you the most, jump in and get engaged.