3 Tips to Market the Sprint/T-Mobile, Other Brand Mergers

When brands or businesses we’ve patronized for years change products, names, offerings or merge with other brands, we often see change as a not so good thing. In our minds, change can signal instability that could then lead to price changes, quality compromises, discontinued product, lackluster services and more.

Change is constant, and something we deal with daily in a rapidly changing world of business developments, technology breakthroughs and, of course, mobile apps that change how we do just about everything. In most cases, we embrace change. We like having a faster, smarter, better way to do routine business tasks, to connect with people, to manage our resources, play games, find information and much more. We like change that impacts our every day, like gas stations that offer 24/7 diners instead of just stale, often expired sandwiches mummified in plastic cartons.

Yet, when brands or businesses we’ve patronized for years change products, names, offerings or merge with other brands, we often see change as a not so good thing. In our minds, change can signal instability that could then lead to price changes, quality compromises, discontinued product, lackluster services and more.

For example, just this week we learn that T-Mobile and Sprint, both of whom had less than half the number of customers as industry-leader Verizon at the end of Q4 2017, are merging. And even though their combined size is still smaller than Verizon and AT&T, they will be a stronger third-place competitor with less than 30 million fewer customers than No. 1, Verizon vs. the nearly 100 million Sprint has as a standalone brand.

While this is good news for shareholders of each company, is it really change for the better for consumers? As quickly as the merger plan was announced, speculation consumed news and social media headlines worldwide as to what this merger really means for consumers: higher prices, the end of unlimited data, more control for the carriers and less competitive offers and perks for the consumers who rely on wireless plans 24/7 for every aspect of daily survival — not just phone calls home to Mom.

As reported in MarketWatch yesterday, the morning after, “It would be devastating for consumers in the long run,” said Chris Mills, news editor at BGR, a news website focused on mobile technology and consumer electronics.

True or not, Mills’ reaction is how many consumers react to change when brands they’ve known for years, and have established a comfortable and trusting relationship with, change. Even so slightly. Mergers, acquisitions, discontinuation or sell-offs of products lines or services, can be unsettling for consumers if not managed properly by brands.

The following are some tips for how to manage consumers’ reactions before they can change your bottom line.

  1. Put a Stake in the Ground That Matters: Define what this change means for your customers’ well-being, not just yours, and what market position this new change will allow you to own, develop and build upon. Does this prepare you for greater sustainability, future breakthroughs and developments through merged R&D efforts by leading minds? Does this improve shopping and service convenience for customers with more access to resources? What is the No. 1 promise and deliverable associated with this change?
  2. Speak Fast: Don’t wait to tell you story. If you are slow to explain how even a small change benefits customers and not just your bottom line, you open the door for competitors and analysts to explain why this could be a bad thing. As the first story heard is often the story that sticks, time is of the essence. Prepare a statement about the “why” and “what” it means, and get it out quickly.
  3. Speak Loudly: With today’s digital channels, loud is not about volume, but about relevance and reach. Send your story to analysts, news writers, influencers, consumers, shareholders, existing customers and more before they can read it elsewhere. Include statements from outsiders explaining why this change is good, and send your story across all channels. Train all your employees how to tell this story credibly at every customer touchpoint.

No matter how big or small your brand is, or the impact of the changes you make, managing change is critical, as our consumer minds will run amuck with all sorts of reasons to lose faith in trusted partners and even jump ship if left to speculate as to how change changes everything they know and trust. Yet change can be a beautiful thing for all involved when done right.

Wikipedia:

Are You Meeting Your Customers’ Mobile Needs?

Most of the U.S. population — 61 percent — say they use mobile phones for shopping activities, according to the 2017 Synchrony Financial Digital Study recently completed. But, what would resonate with them in terms of digital marketing and more importantly, what would drive their behavior?

Game Changing TechAs modern marketers, we put a lot of thought and effort into our digital marketing programs. The goals are to promote engagement with our brands, drive traffic to our website or encourage customers to walk into a store. Many times, the goal is all three.

Most of the U.S. population — 61 percent — say they use mobile phones for shopping activities, according to the 2017 Synchrony Financial Digital Study recently completed. But, what would resonate with them in terms of digital marketing and more importantly, what would drive their behavior? Based on the referenced survey, there are specific elements of mobile marketing that consumers tell they are interested in.

Significantly, 50 percent of consumers said if their favorite retailer sent offers to their mobile devices, they would shop there more often. Mobile marketing can include in-app messages, push notifications, beacon / location based offers, SMS messages and voice recognition.

Given this consumer interest, how many companies are investing in mobile technology? The answer is, it depends. According to “The State Of Digital: A Mobile Commerce Perspective: Forrester’s H2 2016 Global Mobile Executive Online Survey” by Forrester, nearly 70 percent of marketers say they are regularly using responsive Web design and mobile optimized websites. It seems that most companies have the basics of mobile user experience down pat. But fewer companies are actively marketing via mobile. Only about 40 percent regularly use SMS messaging or push notifications, and only one in three use in-app messages.

Another element of mobile marketing that consumers express interest in is location-based marketing. Almost half (46 percent) of all consumers said they would like to get relevant offers based on their location. This is overwhelmingly driven by millennials. For instance, 61 percent of those ages 18 to 25 would like location-based offers, steadily declining for each age group (only about a quarter of those 66 or over said this is the case).

But only 37 percent of marketers are using push notifications and an even smaller percentage (only 12 percent) are regularly using beacon/location support on mobile phones, according to the same Forrester study referenced above. There are certainly restrictions on SMS marketing (consult your legal advisor as to the permissions required), but some companies are still planning to implement these programs — about a quarter are planning to pilot/test SMS messaging, and 35 percent are planning to pilot/test push notifications in the future.

Mobile marketing is clearly an imperative for companies with large numbers of millennials in their current or target consumer base. And remember, Gen Z’s, the true mobile natives, are fast approaching behind the millennial population. They may be even more comfortable with mobile marketing than their millennial older siblings. Investments in mobile technology will certainly be crucial for many more marketers as these populations expect more from their favorite brands.

With the constantly evolving field of smartphone technology, people become more and more enamored of using their phone for anything and everything. Digital marketers are challenged to provide “delighters” to attract and engage the population that is most interested in using this technology. Successful digital marketing programs listen to the customer and proactively engage them, whenever and wherever they happen to be.

Note: The views expressed in this blog are those of the blogger and not necessarily of Synchrony Financial. All references to consumers and population refer to the survey respondents from the Synchrony Financial 2017 Digital Study unless otherwise noted.

4 Things Mobile Users Need

With the speed at which mobile technology and innovation is occurring these days, it’s almost impossible to keep up. With more and more consumers adopting smartphones or tablets and relying on them in everyday shopping decisions, it’s put them in the driver’s seat. As a business owner, it’s your job to keep up.

With the speed at which mobile technology and innovation is occurring these days, it’s almost impossible to keep up.

With more and more consumers adopting smartphones or tablets and relying on them in everyday shopping decisions, it’s put them in the driver’s seat. As a business owner, it’s your job to keep up.

The best way to keep up with mobile consumers is to understand their needs.

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about an interview I had with Brad Frost, a thought leader in the responsive design community. He broke down what is essentially the mobile hierarchy of needs.

He used the pictured pyramid to discuss a mobile user’s needs as it relates to a mobile website; however, I believe these needs apply to more than just mobile Web …

In fact, I think these four needs are key to business success when integrating mobile into the business.

1. Access

At the foundation of the pyramid, you have Access. As Frost will tell you, this means giving the users what they want. When we’re talking about mobile Web, this essentially means giving them the info they are looking for. If they came to your site for tips on cooking the perfect steak … they should be able to find that.

As for overall mobile strategy, you need to consider what your mobile customer needs. Can you give them access to tools that will help them in their lives? Can you give access to specials or coupons while they are on the go?

Access is the first and most important component of success with mobile.

2. Interaction

As Frost mentioned in our conversation, interaction usually results in navigation as it pertains to your mobile website.

Simply, can the user get around your site to accomplish the desired result?

When considering your overall strategy, creating campaigns that allow consumers to interact with you and your business will often lead to deeper engagement and increased conversion opportunities.

3. Performance

Performance is often overlooked—mainly because marketers make too many assumptions about our user.

Your users won’t always have the fastest Internet connection and, despite that, expect your site to load faster than the desktop, although that rarely happens when looking at most mobile sites vs. their desktop counterparts.

Your mobile strategy should be focused on performance, as well. When I think of performance from a strategic standpoint, I think of giving the users what they want as fast and efficiently as possible at my lowest cost.

4. Enhancement

At the top of the pyramid, we have enhancement.

As Frost explained, mobile is inherently different from desktop. Mobile browsers can do things that desktop browsers cannot.

If your customer needs to complete a mobile Web form, you can offer your user different keyboards to help provide important info, such as a phone number.

When it comes to strategy, it’s important to remember mobile is different. Thus, you must consider how you can leverage that in reaching your goals. Can you use location or the accelerometer to give extra value to your customers as you begin to better understand their context?

Whether you’re developing a mobile website or looking for guides as you develop a winning mobile strategy, moving forward with the hierarchy of mobile needs in mind puts you in the best position to succeed.

As a small business owner, this can be your advantage. Because, quite frankly … many big brands fail to do this today.

Now it’s your turn … What are you doing to satisfy your customer’s mobile needs?