7 Direct Mail Best Practices for Food Delivery

It’s been a long hot summer, mercifully drawing to a close. It’s been too hot to make dinner. The thing is, there are only so many times you can go out to eat, or get pizza, or order Chinese. So, the other day, I gathered up some mail I get at the office from food and meal delivery startups. I thought we could try something new.

It’s been a long hot summer, mercifully drawing to a close.

More than a few times, even with our AC on blast, it’s been too hot to make dinner. The thing is, there are only so many times you can go out to eat, or get pizza, or order Chinese.

So, the other day, I gathered up some mail I get at the office from food and meal delivery startups. There’s quite a lot of it, and I thought we could try something new.

But as often happens, I got a good look at how these marketers are using simple direct mail.

1. Reach Out to New Movers

FoodFreshD_01It’s been said a million times, but it bears repeating: New movers are people who represent one of the most potentially valuable segments in life event marketing. They’re ideal prospects for a variety of goods and services as they settle into their new home and neighborhood.

Here, Fresh Direct, a grocery delivery service, smartly welcomes a new mover with a $50 discount. The offer code appears on the back in a coupon.

2. Explain the Process

FoodGraze_01This mailer from Graze, a monthly snack subscription service, shows some of the products it offers. It also numbers and illustrates the steps for a prospect to follow, beginning with an invitation code.

3. Offer an App

FoodDelivery_01Delivery.com is an online marketplace of thousands of restaurants, grocers, among other types of businesses. This mail piece pushes the free app because it makes it easier to order and earn points. To get the customer started, it dangles a 30 percent discount.