Why Google Going to the Dark Side Is Bad for Advertisers

Over time, the simplicity of Google’s results page has clearly eroded. In the beginning, Google’s clear user interface was beloved to search users for its ease of access and clarity. It was easy to spot ads, because they were clearly marked. The Google SERP today is visually very noisy, with lots of distractions.

Over time, the simplicity of Google’s results page has clearly eroded. In the beginning, Google’s clear user interface was beloved to search users for its ease of access and clarity. It was easy to spot ads, because they were clearly marked. The Google search engine results page today is visually very noisy, with lots of distractions.

Google rolled out its new UX on mobile several months ago, and — in mid-January — applied the changes to desktop search. Contrary to the company’s claims that the new design “puts a site’s brand front-and-center, helping searchers better understand where information is coming from, more easily scan results and decide what to explore.”

But the change, in fact, blurs the user’s ability to easily differentiate ads from organic listings. These most recent changes have taken the desktop search engine results page into the dark side, for its UX exhibits “dark patterns” in how it differentiates advertising from organic results. This has a significant downside for advertisers, organic search marketers, and their audiences.

Dark Patterns

Coined by Harry Brignull, a London-based UX designer in July 2010, “dark patterns” are user interfaces that are carefully crafted to trick users into taking an action. Although the current layout places a bold “Ad” indicator next to text ads, and shows favicons next to organic brand listings, it is easy for the user scanning a search page quickly to overlook the ad notation or confuse the ad notation with the similarly placed favicons. Many users choose not to click advertisements, preferring to skim the listings for the page that most clearly suggests the answer to their search query. Savvy users know that the ad may not, in fact, deliver the most relevant page for their query and are wary of paid advertisements.

Google has made it harder for the user to rapidly differentiate, particularly on noisy desktop pages, paid ads from organic content. This new layout is not as distracting on mobile, where the small screen makes each listing stand out. The smaller screen visually reduces the clutter, forcing the user to focus on each result card.

A single search for “high heels shoes” on a desktop yields a cluttered page that includes “sponsored” shopping ads, ads (marked with bold Ad indicator), a set of accordions with “People also ask,” a map and local listings box, and finally organic results.

With all of this distraction, the user is likely to click unintentionally on a poorly differentiated ad. In the future, it will be easy for Google to slip more ads into the pages without creating user awareness of the volume of ads being served.

Why Is This Bad?

When the user cannot clearly differentiate an ad from an organic listing, the advertiser pays for clicks that are unintentional. This depletes the advertiser’s budget, without delivering sales conversions. It is too early to tell the exact levels of the unintentional clicks, but it is my clear bet that there will be a significant volume of them.

Contrary to claims, the new UX is not good for the user. It forces the user to slow down to avoid making a perhaps erroneous decision. Rather than enhancing the user experience, the user will be less satisfied with the results delivered.

For organic search marketers, the redesign makes it imperative to have a favicon that works and clearer branding in the search Titles and Descriptions — because the actual link has been visually downgraded. It is now above the Title.

It is expected that Google will continue to test new ways to demarcate ads from content, but the continued blurring of paid and organic results only really benefits Google.

5 Growth Hacks to Improve Your Organic Market Share

Good SEO used to be about improving website rankings on search engine results pages. Now, though, it’s not quite that simple — equally important is maximizing your first-page real estate.

Good SEO used to be about improving website rankings on search engine results pages. Now, though, it’s not quite that simple — equally important is maximizing your first-page real estate.

To understand why, search for “men’s shoes.” If you’re searching on your smartphone (as most people do), then sponsored listings from AdWords are probably all that you see. Scroll down, and you might see a locator map with shoe stores in your area, followed by a handful of listings with information such as user ratings and hours of operation. You likely need to scroll down even further to reach the organic search results.

Your initial reaction might be, “How will my website ever get noticed with so much competition on search engine results pages?” But if you think about it, a more productive response is, “look at all these ways to get ranked on page one!” Maximizing your website’s exposure on SERPs is critical to boosting organic traffic volume to your website. Here, we’ll review five growth hacks to beat back competitors and meet your organic traffic goals.

1. Improve Your Organic Results Page Share

Organic search results are still the bread and butter of SEO. The impact of a high ranking is somewhat diminished by Google’s inclusion of knowledge graphs, ad extensions, AMP sliders and other elements on search results pages, but good things happen when your website excels in the search rankings.

That said, why settle for just one great search ranking? If you hold the no. 2 ranking but a competitor’s website is ranked in the third, fourth and fifth positions, then are you really better off? It’s just as important, or more so, to claim as many spots as possible on the first pages of search results.

Here’s how to do it.

Start by making a spreadsheet with five columns. In the first column, list the top 25 keywords that bring organic traffic to your website. Then, one by one, search for each keyword on Google. Count the number of placements you have on the first page of search results — that number goes into the second column. Then, look for up to three competitors that also have multiple placements, entering their placement totals in the third, fourth and fifth columns, with the largest number in the third column.

Once finished, you can easily see where competitors are getting the best of you. Those are the keywords where you should prioritize work on your SEO.

2. Don’t Just Optimize for Organic Listings

Sure, you could just focus on organic search results, but that’s like going to an all-you-can-eat brunch buffet and ignoring the prime rib. Organic search results aren’t alone on SERPs. In fact, they’re positioned below AMP sliders, knowledge graphs, maps, images and other elements. Why not strive for more organic traffic by reaching beyond organic listings?