Wunderman’s Lesson: Marketing Isn’t a Product, It’s a Partnership

Over the past few years, relations between ad agencies and clients have been in an even greater state of flux than usual. The nature of just what a marketing agency is and what it does has many definitions. But the key issue is whether the agency, internal or external, is a strategic partner or just another supplier.

Over the past few years, relations between ad agencies and clients have been in an even greater state of flux than usual.

The nature of just what an agency is and what it does has many definitions. But the key issue is whether the agency, internal or external, is a strategic partner or just another supplier. Occupied with headcounts and finance, the suits in the C-suites often don’t understand the difference. And that spells trouble and bad work ahead.

I well remember a client lunch many years ago.

The location was a private room in an excellent restaurant in Lille, France. At the head of the table sat the president of La Redoute, France’s dominant mail order catalog company. Alongside were his recently appointed commercial director and some associates. Facing him from the other end was Lester Wunderman, flanked by Jean Larue, the CEO of the Wunderman French company, and myself. The atmosphere was polite, but tense.

La Redoute was our largest French client, by far; and until the arrival of the new commercial director, relations had been excellent and the measurable results of the work above anyone’s expectations. Drunk on his new power, the new commercial director, an ex-underwear buyer for a competitive mail-order company, was threatening to put the La Redoute advertising business up for review and search for new agencies he insisted “would be less expensive.” No doubt, that’s how he bought underwear. Our problem was that if we lost this business, we would essentially have to start the agency over, from scratch.

The arguments in French and English went back and forth over dessert and cheese, and were getting contentious — until Lester Wunderman held up one hand to silence the room and spoke for the first time. La Redoute, he said, was one of his favorite clients, because they had had the courage to invest in an innovative strategic partnership with the agency and great creative work. It had paid off handsomely.

“Now everything seems to have changed” he said. “We are no longer being seen as partners and are being treated no differently than the hundreds of salesmen for suppliers (fournisseurs) of goods, who pitch their products to the company every day.” Then, switching to French, he pronounced emphatically: “Nous ne sommes pas des fournisseurs!” (We are not suppliers). He then thanked the La Redoute president for hosting the lunch, rose and headed for the door.

Before he could reach it, the president had jumped up, taken him by the arm to sit next to him and, full of warmth and Gallic charm, asserted that there was obviously a misunderstanding, which he would personally and immediately put right. Summoning a waiter, an excellent Cognac was rapidly ordered and served.

The lesson was lost on no one.

Creating marketing excellence lives in a different universe than purchasing paperclips or underwear. In today’s fast-changing and highly competitive commercial environment, replete with excellent metrics, cost is only one factor in the multiple equations that measure success or failure. Head counts are no doubt very important, but companies and agencies would do well to chase value — rather than delude themselves into thinking they are saving a few pennies.

How does the CEO or finance chief know whether what they are paying for is worth the price? There is no easy way to tell, until the return on the marketing investment (ROMI) has been determined. The La Redoute president saw in Lester Wunderman’s demeanor and words about not being a fournisseur, that genius, pride, and integrity had a value that was unquantifiable.

Relations between agencies and their clients have always been sensitive, and moving the work inside the client company may superficially solve certain problems — but probably won’t. “Who knows best is a constant battle, which pits egos and backgrounds against one another in sometimes near-lethal confrontations. Imagine the argument over strategy between a 20-something data maven and a 40-something traditional creative director.

Agency reps who had never heard the word “data,” and whose attitude to “below-the-line” was, at best, dismissive, have been driven by technologies that are profoundly changing the whole concept of advertising, whether they like it or not. Below the line, as evidenced by the absorption of prestigious brand agencies like J. Walter Thompson into direct marketing groups like Wunderman, is more and more where the action is.

Many major companies have tried to solve this problem by building internal agencies with special skills dedicated to their businesses — with varying degrees of success. According to Forbes, ”64% of corporate America have in-house agencies today. Just 10 years ago, that number was 42%.”

The challenge will be if CEOs and finance chiefs can put their macro equations on performance aside and concentrate on building marketing excellence. If they do, they will no doubt see improved ROMIs, whether their marketing is internal or with outside agencies. Or probably better, with both.

5 Reasons to Add Bing Ads to Your Search Campaign

Put simply, you shouldn’t ignore Bing Ads just because it’s dwarfed by Google AdWords. Microsoft has invested heavily in Bing’s success and those efforts are paying off. Bing Ads offers a viable alternative option for connecting your business with new, potential customers. Here are five reasons why you shouldn’t hesitate to make Bing Ads part of your long-term marketing plan.

bing logoIt’s easy to overlook Bing Ads when planning your online marketing efforts.

Google is the undisputed king of search with more than $67 billion in ad revenue in 2015 — by comparison, Bing finally achieved profitability in the first quarter of this year with just $1 billion in revenue. To describe Bing Ads as Google’s little brother might be too much of a compliment. Search is Google’s world, and Bing is just living in it.

Still, Bing has proven itself as a viable upstart in the search business. In April 2015, Microsoft renegotiated its contract with Yahoo to allow Bing’s ads to appear on 51 percent of Yahoo desktop searches — a nice boon for Bing’s bottom line. Microsoft also sold Bing’s display network and map data assets, streamlining the platform’s approach toward search. And now Microsoft is broadening Bing’s potential by incorporating it in several emerging products and technologies. You’ve heard of Cortana in Windows 10? Yep, that’s powered by Bing.

What does this mean for you, a small business owner?

Put simply, you shouldn’t ignore Bing Ads just because it’s dwarfed by Google AdWords. Microsoft has invested heavily in Bing’s success and those efforts are paying off. Bing Ads offers a viable alternative option for connecting your business with new, potential customers. Here are five reasons why you shouldn’t hesitate to make Bing Ads part of your long-term marketing plan.

1. Bing Ads Are Often Cheaper and More Effective

As you could probably guess, most advertisers turn to Google. AdWords is really your only option for reaching the largest number of consumers with the least amount of effort.

Bing is much smaller than Google in terms of reach and revenue — which also means there are far fewer advertisers on Bing’s search network. And that means less competition for marketers who want a piece of Bing’s action. And less competition means cheaper costs per click — up to 33 percent less, according to some studies.

Not only is Bing usually cheaper, but advertisers also get higher ad positions than they would on Google’s more crowded search network. And higher ad placements usually result in higher click-through rates and conversions! Even though Bing doesn’t reach nearly as many people, these benefits are enough to make Microsoft’s ad platform attractive.

2. Bing Ads Let You Effectively Cut Off Tablets

Google caused a collective groan from PPC marketers by taking away the ability to block traffic from tablets. In Google’s eyes, tablets are the future of home computing and should be treated the same as desktops. For everyone else, tablets are giant smartphones both in how they function and how people use them — and that means lower CTRs and conversions than desktop searches.

Similar to Google, Bing has altered its device targeting options so tablets and smartphones can’t be completely turned off. However, Bing allows for incremental bids to be set on both types of mobile devices. Want to turn off tablets? Simply set your incremental bids on tablet traffic to decrease by a substantial percentage. It’s not a bulletproof way to ensure you’ll block all tablet traffic, but at least you won’t spend much money on the few clicks that slip through.

3. Bing Ads Let You Choose Your Partners

Want to choose between advertising on Google or its search partners? Well, you can’t. Google doesn’t let you choose one or the other. Either way, you’re stuck with Google’s primary network. You also don’t get to see which search partners might be running your ads. This is a problem because, while search partners often provide cheaper clicks, sometimes that traffic drastically underperforms.

Bing, on the other hand, gives you complete control. You can advertise only on Bing and Yahoo, or only with search partners — or you can run your ads on all platforms. Also, if you choose to target search partners, you can run reports to see exactly who those partners are. You can then take the additional step of blocking underperforming partners from running your ads. It’s a fantastic benefit that can make search partner targeting so much more worthwhile. And you can’t get that with AdWords.

4. Bing Ads Give You More Control Over Demographics

AdWords allows plenty of demographic targeting options for the Google Display Network, but demographic targeting isn’t an option for search network advertisers by default. Note that it’s possible to get demographic targeting for Search, but you need to go through a Google rep to get it turned on in your account.

Bing Ads, on the other hand, offers both gender and age targeting options by default. This is handled similarly to device targeting — rather than completely block certain demographics, you can decrease bids to specific demographics to effectively exclude them from your campaigns. These adjustments are made at either the campaign or ad group levels, giving you the ability to split test different ad groups with unique demographic targeting settings.

5. Bing Ads Are More In Tune With Social Extensions

A strong social media following is a strong indication of being an online authority — and that’s why Bing started testing social extensions back in 2014. If your business has a large Twitter following, then Bing’s automated social extensions will display your number of Twitter followers alongside your ad. It’s a meaningful extension that can boost your ad’s credibility and help drive conversions.

AdWords also has social extensions, but only for Google Plus. And who uses Google Plus? It’s no secret that Google has bent over backward pushing its social media platform, but Bing’s social extension provides a much more meaningful and socially relevant benefit.

Want more Google AdWords Tips?  Click here to get the Ultimate AdWords checklist.   

4 Tips to Get in the Mobile Mindset

We’ve talked about SMS, mobile websites and mobile email. But, as you may know, those are just tools to get your job of marketing your business done. Yes, building these into your strategy are the core foundations of mobile success, but mobile is more than technology … Mobile is about your customer. Now, I’m not here to shout out stats, because I’ve provided those before. And, frankly, you’re here … so you know adding mobile to your business is critical. Your customers are mobile … therefore, your business needs to be.

We’ve talked about SMS, mobile websites and mobile email. But, as you may know, those are just tools to get your job of marketing your business done.

Yes, building these into your strategy are the core foundations of mobile success, but mobile is more than technology …

Mobile is about your customer.

Now, I’m not here to shout out stats, because I’ve provided those before. And, frankly, you’re here … so you know adding mobile to your business is critical.

Your customers are mobile … therefore, your business needs to be.

Now, before you go and plan your strategy and determine the appropriate tactics to reach your goals, you need to put yourself in the mobile mindset.

I recently attended Mobile Marketer‘s Mobile FirstLook event in New York in which many brands, such as Coca-Cola, Sephora, MillerCoors, Nissan and JetBlue discussed their strategies.

I noticed that all of these individuals work within their entire organization to help them think differently about the mobile opportunity.

Making sure you have the mobile mindset and your organization is on board and you’re more likely to succeed.

Here are four tips I learned from the top brands on getting in the mobile mindset:

1. Think about your mobile opportunity across your organization.

Mobile isn’t just about marketing. Can mobile enable your sales team to sell more effectively? Can mobile optimize tasks to save time? Can mobile save you money by cutting down on transaction fees?

Before you think SMS, QR Codes or apps, think “How can mobile add value to all of the other parts of my organization?”

2. Stop making it complicated.

Believe me, I know it’s super complex and overwhelming to keep up with the latest and greatest technologies.

Coca-Cola focuses on six aspects of its mobile programs. Those are the six that work for THEIR business. They may not be the same for your business, but you can’t worry about ALL the possibilities of mobile. Focus on the handful of things that will most impact your business.

3. Work with the right partners. Ones you can trust.

Luckily, we don’t have to do all of this alone. In fact, if you try you’re more likely to get frustrated and give up. Aligning yourself with the right strategic partners and technology partners is important.

Again, every business is different, so you need to make sure that the workflow and process of your partners matches the style of your business. You most likely want to enjoy working with them, too. Make sure personalities mesh well.

Finally, I don’t care how big your company is. Mobile is no longer a “nice to have.” No matter the size of your business, you can find someone who knows more than you do and who is able to offer services.

4. Stop waiting.

This was probably the most powerful statement of all. So simple, but it needed to be said.

With technology advancing so fast, some businesses find themselves waiting for the next great thing in order to start. Guess what? When you do that … you never start.

Listen, nobody is going to do it for you … it’s on you to dive in and get the process started.

If you’re dilly-dallying and finding excuses to wait just a little bit longer … quit complaining and start taking action.

Yes, you’re going to make mistakes, and that’s fine. But what you learn from those mistakes will be an important part of your growth.

Starting now is the only way you’re going to learn what works for YOUR business.