Short Video vs. Long Video: The Results

The short video vs. long video results are in for our event promotion. After a few twists and turns in the road, we learned that six seconds may not be long enough to deliver what you need in your messaging. We also learned that there are advantages of using Vimeo over YouTube, and that engagement is different based on the style of video you choose to create. But when it comes down to if we’d conduct a short video clip test for this group again, the answer

The short video vs. long video results are in for our event promotion. After a few twists and turns in the road, we learned that six seconds may not be long enough to deliver what you need in your messaging. We also learned that there are advantages of using Vimeo over YouTube, and that engagement is different based on the style of video you choose to create. But when it comes down to if we’d conduct a short video clip test for this group again, the answer is that it’s not likely. But “not likely” may be more of a function of continuing to do something different to capture the interest of fans. It’s the “been there, done that” attitude, and what are we, the direct marketers, going to do next time to top this.

Our results suggest it was the meaty, long-form content videos that got the attention of patrons.

But that said, the short video clips attracted attention and engagement. The repetition of the short video clips likely conditioned the audience to become intrigued with the upcoming shows, resulting in higher conversion toward the show date as they paid more attention to the long-form videos released at the end of the campaign.

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

In the words of blogger Seth Godin, “delivering your message in different ways, over time, not only increases retention and impact, but it gives you the chance to describe what you’re doing from several angles.”

In our video format mix to promote a performing arts organization’s shows, we produced a long-form behind-the-curtain video and a long-form music video. The behind-the-curtain video, like those we have used for past shows, resulted in double the views of individual short video clips. But in defense of the short video format, when views of the five video clips are combined, they are more than double that of the long-form video.

Other results we’ll share in today’s video include how our emailed patrons responded to a series of weekly messages. It became clear that fans like longer videos with more meaty content. That’s what generated the highest email open and clickthrough rate, and generated the best engagement on social media.

Because we know that video works, as evidenced by the 20 percent increase in ticket sales last Christmas, we will continue to use video as the central delivery vehicle for direct marketing of show tickets in the future for this organization.

All-in-all, it was a good test. As a direct marketer, you know that you must dig into the numbers and analyze results every step along the way to see if your tests work. You won’t always hit a home run. But sometimes you have to venture out of your comfort zone to discover what could be the next big marketing opportunity for you. Learn more in today’s video.

Turnaround Tired Direct Marketing Campaigns With Video

Online video marketing has the ability to transform and turnaround a tired direct marketing campaign. We wouldn’t make this claim if we hadn’t witnessed a 20 percent lift in sales from an integrated campaign using video. If you’re a regular reader of our blog, you may recall how we took you inside a successful video marketing program for a performing arts organization in October. At that time, we were testing a “proof of concept” of video marketing

Online video marketing has the ability to transform and turnaround a tired direct marketing campaign. We wouldn’t make this claim if we hadn’t witnessed a 20 percent lift in sales from an integrated campaign using video. If you’re a regular reader of our blog, you may recall how we took you inside a successful video marketing program for a performing arts organization in October. At that time, we were testing a “proof of concept” of video marketing to sell tickets to a Fall performance.

Because the proof of concept using video worked, we applied this approach during November and December to promote the organization’s Christmas shows.

We’re delighted to report that this latest online video campaign worked, lifting sales by nearly 20 percent over last year. And it wasn’t just ticket sales that were impacted. Product sales at the event broke new records, too.

Because the proof of concept in the Fall worked, it gave confidence to the organization to commit to significant changes in marketing direction for the Christmas season.

A series of five “behind the curtain” videos were created to create curiosity in the upcoming performances, interspersed with three “music” videos where the product was, in effect, given away.

A primary advertising channel (and expense) for the organization in prior years—radio—was dropped entirely.

Email marketing was leveraged in a big way because the videos gave purpose to frequent messaging. The previously established Facebook “group” approach wasn’t robust enough for marketing purposes, so we started all over with a Facebook “page.” Twitter and Pinterest played a role. Direct mail remains an important vehicle because the demographics of the group. This was a true multi-media, offline and online direct marketing campaign.

There was some concern that we would “oversaturate” to the installed base of thousands of patrons on the email list and they would unsubscribe in droves. Or that we would “over post” on Facebook and turn off fans who would “unlike” us.

Yet, because we applied sound content marketing practices, not only were patrons not alienated-they asked for more.

It was the viral effect of the video at the core of the campaign that drove engagement, and brought in new patrons to the performances that had never before heard of the group. On Facebook, using promoted posts and ads, friends of friends were introduced to the organization, and many of them came to the show.

Why did this happen? Because weaving everything around online video transformed the entire direct marketing campaign.

The turnaround of a tired effort from the past resulted in three transformations that turned the campaign around: with video, the direct marketing campaign 1. had purpose, 2. enabled frequency and 3. we could use the content marketing component of “free.”

We’ll elaborate on these three transformational components, and how we made them work, in our next blog in early January.

In the meantime, we invite you to watch this video for background about the “proof of concept” campaign from last Fall.