Copywriting for the Left Brain/Right Brain

Writing copy for how the left brain and right brain processes information can make all the difference in your sales outcome. The left brain is customarily considered the area where people process information logically. The right brain is considered to be more creative. But when writing direct marketing copy, you must appeal to both hemispheres. After all the effort to get attention and deliver your message, ultimately it’s in the closing where you

Writing copy for how the left brain and right brain processes information can make all the difference in your sales outcome. The left brain is customarily considered the area where people process information logically. The right brain is considered to be more creative. But when writing direct marketing copy, you must appeal to both hemispheres. After all the effort to get attention and deliver your message, ultimately it’s in the closing where you make your logic-based sales pitch and move your prospective customer to an emotional place where they give themselves permission to buy.

The left hemisphere of your brain does, in fact, have more of a logic and mathematical focus. But to be creative, research finds both the left and right brain hemispheres are used. As marketers, we strengthen our message when we appeal to both the left brain and right brain with a formula to move our message along to our end goal of generating a lead, sale or contribution.

In any successful direct mail letter, landing page or other selling channel there are certain attributes that work well for the logic side of how we process information. Importantly, you need to bring your prospect back to emotion for the final close.

You should always interpret information for your readers, listeners and viewers. It’s the nuance of interpretation-not just throwing out information and letting it sit idly by-that is transformational in generating response. Here are some ways to appeal to logic:

  • Features versus Benefits. It’s easy to talk features of a product or service, but they need to be translated into benefits. Taken a step further, you need to spell out why those benefits are important.
  • Guarantee. Make it specific-not some fluff language that gives you wiggle room that doesn’t assure the prospective buyer. Give your customer 30 days, maybe 60 or 90 days to get a refund. Or how about a lifetime guarantee?
  • Pricing Presentation. Break down the price. Cost per day or month. Another approach: relate price to the cost of not buying the product.

Then when you’ve made your logical left brain appeal, you must move your reader to the emotional right brain. It’s ultimately emotion that will convert to a sale. Bring your prospect to becoming a customer with these conclusions:

  • This is Good. You must lead your reader, listener or viewer to conclude “this is good.”
  • This is Smart. If it’s good, then show them how “this is smart for me.”
  • Open the door to Permission to Act. When in the closing of your message, your copy leads your prospect logically and emotionally, take them to a place where in their mind they give themselves permission to buy.

Using a journey from the logical right brain to the emotional left brain, you give your prospect permission to respond. Do this and you will have done your job as a marketer.

Turning Email and Social Synergy Into Opportunity

In marketing — as in candy bowls — chasing too much opportunity can produce nothing more than paralysis or, at best, a dilution of the effort when it’s spread too thinly.

Too much candy isn’t good for you. As appealing as that big bowl of M&Ms looks right now, you know that if you get even get close to it, you’re going to regret it.

The same can be true in marketing. Working with a marketer who is merging three email programs into one campaign management application, I realized very early that there was huge opportunity for synergy of content as well as cross-selling and promotion between the three brands. The marketer was very excited about the possibility of managing the programs in a true CRM-driven fashion. That was only possible once the programs were generated off the same database and integrated at the subscriber level. Until now, the best this marketer could do was run separate promotions with similar offers, then try to compare the impact on revenue and unsubscribes after the fact. There were never very promising results.

With everything managed in one solution, the field is open for new approaches. A quick diagram of the combined customer base by brand showed a very slim overlap between them. At first glance, that feels like all upside — what a great opportunity to expose each brand to new, known audiences. It’s a big bowl of untouched delicious chocolate!

Synergy situations like this do create opportunity. That can be very exciting. But before you get too swept up in dreaming big, consider how important it is to prioritize those opportunities. In marketing — as in candy bowls — chasing too much opportunity can produce nothing more than paralysis or, at best, a dilution of the effort when it’s spread too thinly.

Consider these factors to help prioritize the opportunities before you:

1. Permission. Never assume permission. Period. First, it may be illegal depending on the countries where you market. Second, it’s bad marketing. There’s plenty of cross-sellling opportunities along the existing permission grants that you own today. At the same time, encourage subscribers to sign up for more types of messages from other brands in your preference center.

Lest you falter in your steadfastness, take this tale to heart: We had one marketer recently suffer a big drop in sender reputation and inbox placement. We traced the high complaints to a few campaigns promoting retail partners. Even though it was the marketer’s brand, template and “from” line, subscribers thought the messages were actually from the partners. Complaints were very high, even though the partners were trusted brands themselves. Subscribers knew they didn’t sign up for email from those brands and didn’t stop to check to see if it was a cross-promotion. They just clicked the spam button. Even if you own the partner brands, don’t assume your subscribers know that. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to gain permission and earn it with every message you send.

2. Audience profile. You don’t have the time or resources to tackle every possible cross-promotion opportunity, so focus on the two to three that have the right criteria — reach, revenue and strategic importance. The latter is sometimes hard to gauge, but it usually involves business drivers, high-value customers or high-visibility projects. Balance those factors out in a spreadsheet so that you have real science behind your discussions. Make sure that every test has an actionable learning so that you can continue to improve and optimize.

3. Brand affinity. Just like in social marketing, customers who already trust you are the ones most likely to take your advice on cross-promotional purchases. Therefore, segment not just by permission status but also by the likelihood of brand affinity that will encourage cross-pollinization of the brands. For example, free online members may have a very low brand affinity and thus are least likely to welcome cross-promotions. Paid members who have purchased recently or have more than one product will be more likely to welcome upsell offers (and not complain).

4. Sales channel preference. A factor that became more important than we initially considered is sales channel — e.g., those who purchase in-store versus online. Not only are there demographic differences between the two, but there are also differences in the way email is used. For example, in this case email wasn’t very successful at encouraging in-store customers to purchase online, but it was effective in generating store traffic. Seems obvious now that we see the results, but of course the magic is in the discovery.

5. Customer life cycle. This is perhaps the most important factor. I’ve found time and again that marketers are way too confident in their assumptions about how interested consumers are in their offers. In fact, you have to start way back in the life cycle for cross-promotions, just as you would with new prospects (which, of course, many of these people are). Nurturing has to start with discovery and exploration. Too many times marketers hit prospects with offers well before they’ve established credibility with them or before they even acknowledge their own needs.

What have you learned from your efforts to create new revenue and customer satisfaction opportunities through data integration? Please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments section below.

Four Email Marketers, My Gmail Account, and Why They Matter to You

Let me tell you the story of four marketers’ emails and their placement in my Gmail account. Trust me. Their story matters to you. I gave none of the four marketers permission to send me email. Yet, two are making it into my inbox. Two are being shunted off into my spam folder.

Let me tell you the story of four marketers’ emails and their placement in my Gmail account. Trust me. Their story matters to you.

I gave none of the four marketers permission to send me email. Yet, two are making it into my inbox. Two are being shunted off into my spam folder.

The four merchants are Walmart’s PictureMe Portrait Studios, Kmart, Cigar Auctioneer and Weber-Stephens Products.

The two marketers getting shunted off to my spam folder are PictureMe Portrait Studios and Kmart.

PictureMe Portrait Studios began sending me email after I had a mug shot taken for my website at MagillReport.com.

Somehow, Gmail recognized PictureMe Portrait Studios’ messages immediately as spam. I can only guess, but PictureMe Portrait Studios’ emails were probably being delivered to people’s spam folders long before they started spamming me.

Regular offers on having portraits taken sent without permission is probably prompting people to hit the spam button. How often does the average person want their portrait taken, after all?

Kmart started sending me email after I gave my address during a big-dollar purchase to Sears, its sister company under the Sears Holdings Corp. umbrella

Astoundingly, while Kmart’s email is being delivered into my spam folder, Sears’s email is being delivered to my inbox.

Why is that astounding? Because I gave permission to one of Sears Holdings’ brands and not the other to send email. Gmail has apparently somehow discerned this and is treating their email accordingly and they are the same company.

Meanwhile, Cigar Auctioneer and Weber-Stephens are getting delivered into my inbox. Weber-Stephens began sending me email after I bought a grill refurbishing kit from its online store. Cigar Auctioneer began sending me email after I did business with its parent, Famous Smoke Shop.

Neither had permission to send me email. Yet both their messages are marked as priority emails in my inbox.

Why? Because I open every single message I get from them. Weber-Stephens sends a recipe-of-the-week email every Friday. I look forward to them. I open them and I cook about half the recipes in them.

And because of Cigar Auctioneer, I haven’t paid retail prices for my hand-rolled smokes in months. I don’t always get my favorite brands, but boy do I save money.

And here is why my inbox experience matters to you: Email inbox providers are reportedly increasingly eying how individuals interact with their email to determine whether or not it’s spam. As a result, email is increasingly becoming more about engagement.

Translation: You can get a little fast and loose with your permission practices with customers as long as you send email they want and interact with.

Conversely, you can exercise the gold standard in permission practices-fully confirmed opt in where people must respond to a confirmation message in order to be added to your file-but if you send a bunch of unwanted crap, your messages will be treated as such.

Email inbox providers’ spam filters are designed to deliver email people want and filter out email people don’t want.

Send messages people want and you’ll be fine. It’s really that simple. Or not, depending upon what it is you’re selling.

Cigar Auctioneer and Weber-Stephens have fairly obvious advantages over other marketers. Their messages invoke thoughts of highly self-indulgent experiences. As a result, they stand a better chance of being welcomed than email from marketers whose products and services don’t invoke similar pleasurable thoughts.

So Cigar Auctioneer and Weber-Stephens can afford to be a little loosey goosey with their permission practices while Kmart and PictureMe Portrait Studios apparently cannot.

The lesson: Make an honest assessment of your product or service and what it represents to customers and prospects. Then make an honest assessment of the email program you’ve set up around it.

Can you honestly say people are likely to want your messages? If not, go back at it. Something needs to be changed.