5 Copy Approaches to Influence Gut Reaction

Call it a gut reaction, but oftentimes our prospects and customers make decisions and respond based on intuition, a hunch, or professional judgment. In direct response, we want quick action. We know if the prospect drifts away from our message we’ll lose them, usually forever. So while the logic and quantification of your sales story may be overwhelmingly in your favor, it can be intuition that turns the prospect away because

 

Call it a gut reaction, but oftentimes our prospects and customers make decisions and respond based on intuition, a hunch or professional judgment. In direct response, we want quick action. We know if the prospect drifts away from our message, we’ll lose them, usually forever. So while the logic and quantification of your sales story may be overwhelmingly in your favor, it can be intuition that turns the prospect away because of something that felt too good to be true, leaves room for skepticism, or an unintended nuance in copy that you overlooked and loses the sale for you.

Even if all the arguments you’ve made in your content are authentically and credibly in your favor, a person’s gut decision often prevails.

And here’s what is frustrating: Studies suggest that often a person’s gut reaction is wrong because it’s subject to bias. Your prospect might overestimate his or her ability to assemble a product, for example. Or may think it takes too much time to read your information, learning materials or book. Perhaps when your prospect has made a mistake related to what you’re selling, he or she doesn’t understand why, or is hesitant to ask for help or feedback. And she or he forgets. That is, customers forget the last time they made a poor decision based on their gut instead of listening to logic.

How do you overcome gut emotion and reaction? You have to help your prospective customers or donors through the decision making process. Do it with these ideas:

  1. Lead your prospect to a sense of revelation. That happens when the obvious in your conscious mind finally learns something that your subconscious mind already knew. Ask yourself: When are you most creative (what you might consider right brain thinking)? For most people, it’s when we are exercising, walking, jogging, listening to music, in the shower, or in an unfamiliar environment. Some of my best ideas have struck me while on vacation, when my mind is suspended from the consciousness of day-to-day responsibilities. Lead your prospect to an awakening.
  2. Give ’em chills. A reaction inside the mind often is accompanied by a physical sensation. It could be chills or goosebumps. For some people, it may be an unusual feeling in the stomach or throat. You can create these physical sensations when copy is accompanied by strong visuals that paint a picture. Music is another way to stimulate a physical reaction. While you can’t pipe in music to printed material, you can use music in video or on your website.
  3. Past experience recall. Your brain’s hippocampus stores long-term memory. Long-term memories are with you for your entire life, unless something comes along to pave new grooves and create a new memory. You aren’t likely to replace past long-term memories, but you do have the opportunity to create another memory that neutralizes a bad memory, or enhance a good memory. Creating new memory is harder to do than drawing on a past memory. When you can, allow your content to take your prospect to a positive place, or hit a negative memory head-on with something so strong you can overcome the negativity.
  4. Challenge the perceptual rules made up in the mind. For some people, changing an ingrained rule is impossible, even if it’s wrong. If when a person can’t articulate why the rule exists, you may be able to use an overwhelming amount of empirical data or statistics from credible third party sources to turn around a rules-based individual. But don’t count on it.
  5. Recognize Patterns and Cross-Index. Help your prospect see something familiar to engage intuitive skills. The more material about your product or service that you can provide to cross-index in the mind, the higher likelihood your prospect’s intuition will kick in on a positive note for you.

You won’t always be able to prevail over intuition or gut reaction, but when you anticipate that probability in your copy, you can turnaround a potential lost sale.

7 Tasty Copywriting Languages

How tasty is your copywriting? Taste-related words and figurative language can be more deliciously persuasive and sumptuously effective than literal words with the same meaning. Words that stimulate taste-activated areas in the brain are known to be associated with emotional processing. Language that frequently uses physical sensations or objects that refer to abstract domains, such as time, understanding or emotion, actually

How tasty is your copywriting? Taste-related words and figurative language can be more deliciously persuasive and sumptuously effective than literal words with the same meaning. Words that stimulate taste-activated areas in the brain are known to be associated with emotional processing. Language that frequently uses physical sensations or objects that refer to abstract domains, such as time, understanding or emotion, actually requires more brainpower, resulting in more engagement and comprehension.

To illustrate the point, the sentence, “She looked at him sweetly,” sparks more brain activity in emotion-based regions, like the amygdala, than, “She looked at him kindly.” Why? Because “sweet” amplifies a more physical experience, according to new research from Princeton University and the Free University of Berlin.

Figurative language can be more persuasive and effective in copywriting because your message is more imaginable in the reader’s mind.

For direct response copy, when practical (and without going overboard), a few tasty, figurative language uses can create more emotional reaction from your prospective customers. Figurative language works because the copy goes beyond the actual meanings of words. This way, the reader gains new insights into the objects or subjects in the work. Here are seven types of figurative language to consider using in copy and messaging.

1. Simile
A simile compares two things using the words “like” and “as.” Examples include:

  • Clean as a whistle
  • Brave as a lion
  • Stand out like a sore thumb

2. Metaphor
When you use a metaphor, you make a statement that doesn’t make literal sense, like “time is a thief.” It only makes sense when the similarities between the two things become apparent or someone understands the connection. Examples include:

  • Time is money
  • He has a heart of stone
  • America is a melting pot

3. Personification
Personification gives human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals or ideas. This can affect the way your customer imagines things. Examples include:

  • Opportunity knocked on the door
  • The sun can greet you tomorrow morning
  • The sky was full of dancing stars

4. Hyperbole
Hyperbole is an outrageous exaggeration that emphasizes a point, and can be ridiculous or funny. Hyperbole is useful in fiction to add color, but should be used sparingly and with caution in marketing copy. Examples are:

  • You snore louder than a freight train.
  • It’s a slow burg. I spent a couple of weeks there one day.
  • You could have knocked me over with a feather.

5. Symbolism
Symbolism occurs when a word which has meaning in itself, but it’s used to represent something entirely different. In this case, work with your graphics team, as images can express symbolism powerfully. Examples are:

  • Using an image of a flag to represent patriotism and a love for one’s country.
  • Using an apple pie to represent an American lifestyle.
  • Using an apple to represent education.

6. Alliteration. Alliteration is a repetition of the first consonant sounds in several words. An example:

  • Wide-eyed and wondering while we wait for the other ones to waken

7. Onomatopoeia. Onomatopoeia is the use of words that sound like their meaning, or mimic sounds. They add a level of fun and reality to writing. Here are some examples:

  • The burning wood hissed and crackled
  • The words: beep, boom, bong, click, clang, click, crunch, gobble, hum, meow, munch, oink, pow, quack, smash, swish, tweet, wham, whoosh, zap and zing.

Regardless of the type of words used, figurative language can help people visualize your product or service more instinctively. With tasty copy, you heighten senses that immerse prospects and customers to more powerfully see themselves possessing what you have to offer.

Beware of Dubious Data Providers: A 9-Point Checklist

Are you hounded by email pitches offering access to all kinds of prospective business targets? I am, and I hate it. As a B-to-B marketer, I am always interested in new customer data sources, so I feel compelled to at least give them a listen. So, over time, I have come up with a nine-point assessment strategy to help marketers determine the likely legitimacy of a potential vendor, using approaches that can be replicated by anyone, at arm’s length.

Are you hounded by email pitches offering access to all kinds of prospective business targets? I am, and I hate it. As a B-to-B marketer, I am always interested in new customer data sources, so I feel compelled to at least give them a listen. But when I ask a few questions—like where their data comes from—answers come back like “A variety of sources” or “Sorry, that’s our intellectual property.” So, over time, I have come up with a nine-point assessment strategy to help marketers determine the likely legitimacy of a potential vendor, using approaches that can be replicated by anyone, at arm’s length.

Of course a lot of these emails are simply fraudulent. Early on, I stumbled upon an anonymous blog that reports on the most egregious of these emailers and connects them to unscrupulous spammers tracked by Spamhaus. It’s pretty hilarious to learn that many of these data sellers are complete fakes, sending identical emails from fake companies and fake addresses.

If you want to just delete them all as a matter of course, that’s a reasonable strategy. Myself, I’ve been throwing them in a folder called “suspicious data providers,” and every so often, I dig in to see if there’s any wheat among the chaff. And that is where this checklist was born.

I got some ideas from two colleagues who have written helpfully on this problem. Tim Slevin provides a nice 3-point assessment approach in the SLMA blog, where he recommends checking out the vendors’ physical address, researching them on LinkedIn, and asking them for a data sample so specific that you can tell whether their product is any good. All terrific ideas, which I have gladly incorporated in my approach.

Ken Magill, who writes an amusing and informative publication on email marketing, tackled this subject on behalf of one of his readers, who had unhappily prepaid for an email list that didn’t arrive. “You’re never going to see that $3000 again,” says Ken to the sucker. Ken offers a dozen or so red flags to look for when considering buying email addresses—and I have picked up some of his ideas, too. Magill wraps up his discussion with: “If you suspect you’d have trouble serving them with court papers, do not do business with them.”

So, to get to the point, here is my list of yes/no questions, which can be examined fairly easily, without any direct contact with the vendor.

  1. Do they have a website you can visit?
  2. Do they provide a physical business address?
  3. Do they have a company page on LinkedIn?
  4. Are the names of the management team provided on the website?
  5. Is there a client list on the website?
  6. Is there a testimonial on the website with a real name attached?
  7. Do they claim some kind of guaranteed level of accuracy for their data?
  8. Do they require 100 percent pre-payment?
  9. Is the sales rep using a Gmail or other email address unrelated to the company name?

For question Nos. 7, 8 and 9, a “no” is the right answer. For the first six, “yes” is what you’re looking for. I’d say that any vendor who gets more than one or two wrong answers should be avoided. Any other ideas out there?

A version of this article appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.

Strategies for Growing Your Mobile Marketing Program

You’ve seen all the numbers. Heck, just look around. People are increasingly reliant on their mobile devices to meet the needs of their daily lives. They’re consuming content via mobile devices and interacting with the physical world in a wide range of ways.

You’ve seen all the numbers. Heck, just look around. People are increasingly reliant on their mobile devices to meet the needs of their daily lives. They’re consuming content via mobile devices and interacting with the physical world in a wide range of ways.

The importance of mobile in our daily lives was recently reflected in a July 2011 report from Metacafe:

  • 31 percent of survey respondents said they can’t live without their mobile phone;
  • 22 percent said they can’t live without their smartphone;
  • 19 percent said they can’t live without their video game console; and
  • 7 percent said they can’t live without their tablet.

If that weren’t enough, the other categories in the survey show that consumers also find radio, newspapers, magazines, TV, laptops and PCs, and e-reader devices to be of value as well, all of which are increasingly taking on a mobile hue. Mobile is fundamentally shaping how the modern-day consumer interacts with the world.

It’s certainly exciting watching the growth of mobile and its use for consumer engagement and marketing. However, when you look at the adoption numbers of mobile, as well as all the ways consumers are using their mobile devices, we’re not seeing an equal growth of media spend within the mobile media and advertising categories. True, there’s a number of forward-looking brands that have embraced mobile as a medium to engage their customers, but for the majority of brand marketers mobile still eludes them.

They don’t have a mobile presence; that is, the majority of marketers have yet to deploy a mobile-optimized website, application or messaging solution that seamlessly interfaces their core brand message, offerings, content and customer relationship management solutions.

It’s clear that brand marketers are beginning to emotionally understand the strategic imperative of mobile, but when it comes to allocating budget the results speak for themselves. Most marketers haven’t moved past the emotion of knowing they need mobile to the next stage of critical decision making in order to allocate larger portions of their budget to mobile.

There are a number of factors that, if addressed, can help brand marketers make informed investment decisions in the mobile space. What brands want or need are:

  • comparable case studies and benchmark metrics from players within their respective market sector;
  • research that provides directional evidence of brand marketing spend allocations across industries and media;
  • efficiencies in mobile presence development and media buying/targeting across all media; and
  • education on why and where spending can be effectively applied to meet specific objectives, how to execute programs that enhance engagement at every stage of the consideration funnel, and when programs should be developed and delivered — and in what sequence.

Research, education and experience sharing (i.e., case studies) are all factors that can be addressed in short order. Market players (e.g., brand marketers, agencies, media and advertising companies, and the myriad of mobile experience enablers) need to join forces with the common understanding that the world is mobile. A collective force — e.g., the global Mobile Marketing Association membership base in partnership with the Association of National Advertisers, the Direct Marketing Association and others — can create the momentum needed to address the above factors, as well as reduce industry friction and serve the consumers of today who clearly have the world in the palm of their hands. They just need guidance on how to embrace it. A great place to join forces is at trade events, within association committees, with our respective customers and communities, and, most importantly, within our own firms. To embrace tomorrow you must embrace mobile today. Life is mobile.