Dollars for Democracy in 2016 Election

Well, the two major parties have just finished their national conventions, but this very strange election year is far from over. For better or for worse. In 2016, direct mail is still an effective way to raise money for a political campaign and get people to the polls. Here are some thoughts about two recent direct mail efforts from the Clinton and Trump campaigns.

Well, the two major parties have just finished their national conventions, but this very strange election year is far from over. For better or for worse.

ElectionDayEagleOver the past four election cycles, I have written about what I’ve seen going on in direct mail and email collected by Who’s Mailing What!

For example, in 2012, I looked at two fundraising direct mail tactics that were used for the first time. And, earlier this year, I offered some tips on how to get political direct mail noticed.

From formats and premiums, and call-to-action (CTA) buttons to subject lines, there’s a lot to review and think about. So far, I’m not seeing anything that’s all that new or different. So, I’ve decided to look at what really drives response in this sector: the copy.

Way back in 1984, the second-ever issue of the print newsletter Who’s Mailing What! featured a critique of Republican efforts by liberal fundraiser Roger Craver.

The first part of his “Dollars For Democracy” article still resonates very strongly in its section “Why People Give to Politics.” (If you’d like, just email me at pbobnak@napco.com and I can send you a PDF of it in its entirety.)

To summarize his analysis: political direct mail contributors are not the “fat cats” who expect favors or budget earmarks in exchange for money. Rather, they’re what he calls “donors of principle.” These are people who don’t need to be persuaded about the rightness of a candidate, party or issue, but can be motivated to donate by a mailer’s copy and design.

According to Craver, the best direct mail packages are those that include one or more of these factors in how the copy is written:

  •  a sense of mission or challenge;
  •  a sense of selectivity, or exclusivity that flatters the recipient;
  •  a sense of urgent need that gets the contributor to give ASAP; and
  •  a sense of continuity and effectiveness that acknowledges the power of the opponent, but also reassures victory if a donation is made soon.

In 2016, direct mail is still an effective way to raise money for a political campaign and get people to the polls. But email can take advantage of Craver’s factors 24/7, based on the day’s events in a campaign.

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I’ll be examining email in a future column, but for now, some thoughts about two recent direct mail efforts from the Clinton and Trump campaigns.

Mission

Since her campaign began, the direct mail for Hillary Victory Fund has asked a question on its outer: “[FNAME], this is our moment … are you with me?” Inside, she talks about her upbringing and offers: “I still believe that if you do your part, you ought to be able to get ahead and stay ahead.”

The Trump Make America Great Again Committee envelope puts its slogan in all caps on the front of its outer: “MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN.” “This election is going to be about big ideas,” the letter claims.

Selectivity

After explaining her vision, Clinton goes after the GOP’s: “You and I know their plan fails us.” “Right now, we have to fight harder than ever for the Democratic vision,” she says.

Trump urges the donor to complete the enclosed issues survey and make a donation. “I cannot succeed, nor can our Party prevail … without the support of dedicated Americans like you,” he declares.

Urgency

“Republicans are coming at us with everything they’ve got,” Clinton warns. “Primary season is here — right now — and we need you in this critical moment.”

For Trump, the warning: “America’s future is on the line.” And later, “America is truly at a crossroads in this presidential election.”

Continuity

“But Republicans are spending millions to mislead voters, so we must be able to expose the lies and rhetoric,” Clinton says. “We can keep the White House, help Democrats win up and down the ticket in November, and deliver real victories.”

“Hillary Clinton, the Democrats, and their liberal cronies will continue to raise and spend every dollar they can get their hands on,” Trump says. “[Y]our gift is critical … to helping get our message out.”

Keep in mind that these “ingredients”, as Craver called them, may vary from one effort to the next. But, he said, “successful packages contain most or all of them.” I’m going to keep my eyes open as more mail comes to my desk. And as always, I’d love to hear your comments below.

How to Win With Political Direct Mail

Direct mail can be a powerful tool for your political campaign. It influences not only the opinions of voters, but their actions as well. For many years now, the majority of political mail has been on the attack of opponents. Some have gotten downright nasty, not just in direct mail channels either.

Screen Shot 2016-04-25 at 12.31.10 PMDirect mail can be a powerful tool for your political campaign. It influences not only the opinions of voters, but their actions as well. For many years now, the majority of political mail has been on the attack of opponents. Some have gotten downright nasty, not just in direct mail channels either. Sure attack ads work, but mixing in a combination of informative direct mail with the attack pieces can enhance the candidate’s or proposition’s overall appeal. There are other channel options out there, but they are not anywhere near as effective as direct mail. Unlike a business that is selling products or services and has the ability to sell them over a long period of time, political mail needs to convince people quickly to either support or not to support a candidate or a proposition.

How can direct mail help a political campaign?

1. Targeting

Choose your audience specifically. You can select types of voters you need to send to based on party affiliation, frequency of voting, gender, location and so much more. Reach out to only the people you need to in order to get the most bang for your buck.

2. Integrated

Including QR codes and PURLS (personalized web pages) that take people to landing pages with more information is a good idea. An even better idea is to create an experience for them. Get creative so that you build engagement as well as a desire to share that experience with others. Make sure everything you do is mobile friendly. Consider using videos online for voters to get to know the candidate or the proposition.

3. Influential

Mail is viewed as the most trustworthy marketing channel. Take advantage of that, as well as the tangibleness of direct mail. Add texture and coatings to enhance your message and get people to enjoy the feel of your mail piece. The more you get people to interact with your direct mail, the more influence you have on them.

4. Variable

Direct mail using variable data printing allows you to send different messages to different people in the same mailing. This can be used to not only change out text, but also images to make a greater impact on each individual. When you are able to appeal to each individual you have a greater impact on them.

5. Analysis

Direct mail is very measurable. Knowing what is working and what is not allows you to make changes quickly to your next mail piece. Do not be afraid to try new things, but make sure you are analyzing the results.

Direct mail is powerful when done correctly. There are some pitfalls you need to avoid. The first major one is to stay within postal regulations. After you design a piece, send a PDF to your mail service provider to review before you print. They can tell you of any problems and save you the extra postage. The next pitfall is your list. Make sure that you are targeting the right voters — otherwise you are just wasting money. Finally, your message needs to be clear, concise and tell people exactly what you want them to do.

Now, more than ever before direct mail can create experiences that no other channel can. You can enhance direct mail with Augmented Reality, Near Field Communication, QR codes, textures and more. Use these to really make your mail piece grab attention and get results!