Addressing Unspoken Fear in Healthcare Marketing

There’s a lot of fear in healthcare marketing — the unspoken fears that lurk in the minds of consumers, blocking their ability to absorb your content. Marketers who don’t address these nagging worries in the conversion funnel risk turning off prospects who are otherwise excellent candidates for that service line.

Healthcare Marketing Strategy
Credit: Pixabay by Gerd Altmann

There’s a lot of fear in healthcare marketing. I’m referring to unspoken fears that lurk in the minds of consumers, blocking their ability to absorb your content. Marketers who don’t address these nagging worries in the conversion funnel risk turning off prospects who are otherwise excellent candidates for that service line.

Fear is a funny thing. A little of it keeps you alert and causes you to be more careful. Too much fear and you cognitively shut down. The difference — in the first scenario you believe you can do something to minimize the danger, while in the other scenario you don’t know of a solution and you feel paralyzed.

Imagine marketing a service line for a serious health condition. Your reader may have insurance, but there’s a negative inner dialogue unfolding in his mind: “I will miss work. If I miss too much work, I might lose my job. If I lose my job, I won’t have life or health insurance. If I don’t have insurance or a job, I could bankrupt my family. They would end up with nothing.”

The prospect has catastrophized a possible outcome and now wants to avoid your messaging entirely out of both fear and guilt. And because these internal monologues are unspoken, it’s very difficult to get the kind of feedback that enables you to make improvements. If you have service line campaigns that are not performing, ask yourself if fear might be getting in the way and how you can break down those barriers to conversion.

You can address unspoken fears at several places along the funnel, starting right at the top and adding more detail along the consumer journey:

  • At the top of the funnel, consider adding a truthful, positive indicator into your outbound messaging that contrasts today’s treatment with what was available years ago. Advances in knowledge, techniques, and technology can help a fearful consumer move beyond legacy emotional assumptions and create a narrow window of reconsideration.
  • On your campaign page, proactively address common concerns while also streamlining navigational flow to your call-to-action. A generic FAQ link may be too subtle for consumers with nagging worries. Consider clearly labeled links such as “Time away from work,” “Insurance accepted,” “How outcomes have changed,” “Managing out-of-pocket costs” or similar topic-specific labels. Each item or grouping should conclude with your CTA.
  • System-generated emails triggered by user submissions as well as nurture campaigns should include links to content that normalizes typical concerns and provides reassurance that these can be discussed comfortably at the appointment. Some patient no-shows are caused by nagging worries that cause people to disengage even before an in-person consultation.
  • Consider adding a simple form at check-in that asks about the patient’s concerns and provides pre-populated topics to select. Patients can become surprisingly quiet when the doctor enters the room. If the provider knows what topics are weighing on the patient’s mind, the dialogue can be more meaningful and a foundation of trust developed.

And throughout this process, work with your organization’s best-performing providers as well as financial counselors, patient navigators, social workers and philanthropic foundation for insights that help improve responses to common patient concerns.