Amazon Aims to Shut Down ‘Showrooming’

First off, I’m a fan of Amazon. I can order everything from cat litter to sequined gowns, from dried blueberries to external hard drives. And I love that. So when I found out Amazon was granted a patent that prevents in-store price checking, well, let’s say there was a bit of a record scratch.

Amazon shopping memeFirst off, I’m a fan of Amazon. I can order everything from cat litter to sequined gowns, from dried blueberries to external hard drives. And I love that.

I’m a loyal Prime member, as well, and appreciate that when I’m too busy to make it to the store, I can order cat food for Apollo and have it delivered two days later.

So when I found out Amazon was granted a patent that prevents in-store price checking, well, let’s say there was a bit of a record scratch.

From The Washington Post:

Amazon was awarded a patent May 30 that could help it choke off a common issue faced by many physical stores: Customers’ use of smartphones to compare prices even as they walk around a shop. The phenomenon, often known as mobile “window shopping,” has contributed to a worrisome decline for traditional retailers.

But Amazon now has the technology to prevent that type of behavior when customers enter any of its physical stores and log onto the WiFi networks there. Titled “Physical Store Online Shopping Control,” Amazon’s patent describes a system that can identify a customer’s Internet traffic and sense when the smartphone user is trying to access a competitor’s website.

Trust me, there has been MANY a time in which I pulled out my iPhone while standing in the middle of a Target aisle, unable to find the item I’m looking for so I give up and look on Amazon. While still in Target. Why? Because I don’t want to forget that I need to pick up whatever the item is (and can’t get at Target). And yes, I’ve also done some comparison shopping, because that’s the norm nowadays.

This patent is a little scary. Sure … it’s for use in Amazon’s own brick and mortar stores, on the store Wi-Fi, so it’s not widespread — yet —  but it seems a bit hypocritical. I mean, Amazon is the company that’s benefited wildly from showrooming!

But here’s the deal: This patent is the foot in the door for more of this to occur. Who’s to say Target wouldn’t be next, keeping me from searching online for houseware items I can’t manage to find in their store?

I understand that showrooming has been a real punch in the gut for some brick and mortar retailers, but it’s the new reality. You can either adapt and evolve, or you can do shady things like block someone’s online search … causing consumers to get ticked off and go elsewhere.