Emails That Target Customer Behavior Without Using Big Data

The ever increasing volumes of data used by companies like Target, Walmart and Amazon to carefully target their customers is cumbersome and difficult to manage. Analyzing patterns to find the right trigger that will motivate an individual to buy requires gifted statisticians that combine art and science into marketing magic. But what if you are not quite ready to use big data in your business? Can you still reap some of the benefits?

The ever increasing volumes of data used by companies like Target, Walmart and Amazon to carefully target their customers is cumbersome and difficult to manage. Analyzing patterns to find the right trigger that will motivate an individual to buy requires gifted statisticians that combine art and science into marketing magic. But what if you are not quite ready to use big data in your business? Can you still reap some of the benefits?

Fortunately for companies that don’t have a team of statisticians standing by, customer behavior and activity can be used to increase sales without the challenges that come with big data. It’s as simple as watching for specific activity or changes in customer behavior and being prepared with a customized response to encourage people to buy.

If this is your first venture into customer behavior marketing, start with the people who are the easiest to identify. Seasonal and discount shoppers are relatively easy to recognize because they have very specific buying patterns. Creating customized marketing for them increases their response and reduces costs. The dual benefits make this a logical place to begin.

Seasonal shoppers are the people who purchase items at specific times of the year. Traditional RFM (recency, frequency, monetary value) analytics flag them as top buyers shortly after a purchase and then systematically move them down the value chain. When they place the next order, they move back to the top and flow down again. Creating a marketing plan that sends materials when they are most likely to buy reduces marketing costs without affecting sales.

Discount shoppers only buy when there is a sale. This segment can be further divided into subsets based on how much discount is required to get the sale. If the marketing is properly tailored, this group of people serves as inventory liquidators. Minimizing the non-sale direct mail pieces they receive and heavily promoting sales increases revenue while reducing costs.

Both groups respond well to promotional emails. Capturing email addresses should be standard operating procedure. It is especially critical for seasonal and discount shoppers because they tend to be more impulsive than other segments. The emails that remind seasonal shoppers that it is that time again and tell discount buyers about the current sales are economical and effective.

The next step after targeting shopper segments is adding specific product category information based on the individual’s shopping history. When my daughter was younger, my shopping behavior with American Girl included two orders per year for regular priced items and sale purchases in between. The two full price orders were placed just before Christmas and her birthday. Sale purchases were impulse driven and triggered by emails announcing clearance items.

Bitty Baby was the category of choice in the early years of buying from American Girl. The shift to the character dolls didn’t happen until my daughter was nine. She received her first Bitty Baby at two. During nine years of systematic purchases, no one recognized that I only ordered certain things at specific times. How much would your company save if your marketing was tailored to customer purchasing patterns?

What about targeting people who haven’t purchased from a specific category?

The ability to predict what people want before they know it is one of the advantages of analyzing trends and activity in big data. Before moving to that level, start with the information that shoppers are providing. This trigger email from Amazon was sent two weeks after I searched for soda can tops on their site without purchasing.

The email avoids the creepy factor by saying, “are you looking for something in our Kitchen Utensils & Gadgets department? If so, you might be interested in these items.” Instead of, “because we noticed that you spent 14.34 minutes searching for soda can tops you may be interested in the ones below.”

The best practices included in this email are:

  • It doesn’t share how they know that the shopper is interested in a specific category or item.
  • The timing from the original search to email generation is long enough to allow time to purchase, but not so long the search is forgotten.
  • It makes accessing the items easy by providing multiple links.
  • The branding is obvious with links to my account, deals and departments.

Targeting customer behavior can become very complicated very quickly. Starting simple with specific segments and activity allows you to test and build on the lessons learned. The return on investment is quick and may surprise you.