6 Ways to Use Email Partnerships to Increase Sales

Email marketing campaigns are typically limited to the people who subscribed to the company’s messages. Partnering with non-competitive organizations increases exposure to offers and helps grow your email address database faster. Finding potential partners is easier than one might think. The need to provide fresh content on a regular basis opens the door for partnership development. The key to doing it well is to find organizations that cater to people who match your customer demographics. Conduct extensive research before reaching out to potential partners.

Email marketing campaigns are typically limited to the people who subscribed to the company’s messages. Partnering with non-competitive organizations increases exposure to offers and helps grow your email address database faster. Finding potential partners is easier than one might think. The need to provide fresh content on a regular basis opens the door for partnership development. The key to doing it well is to find organizations that cater to people who match your customer demographics. Conduct extensive research before reaching out to potential partners.

When considering opportunities, clearly define your objectives, know what you have to offer, start small, and build from successful experiences. Choosing partners that have similar corporate values contributes to the trust level. Recipients who trust your partner tend to automatically trust your company and vice versa.

Google Offers
Google’s promotions are designed to work with Google Plus Local. It uses email and an android app to deliver messages to the people who have joined the program. The app delivers messages to subscribers when they are close to the location of participating companies and when chosen offers are nearing expiration.

Partnering with Offers is free at this time. There are minimal requirements for participation: Your business must have a physical location in the United States that serves customers, it must be verified using Google Places for Business, and the product line must be eligible. This partnership is easy to set up and cost effective.

Pinterest
The rich pins option for Pinterest has a new feature that sends emails to users when items they have pinned go on sale. The emails include good imagery and a simple marketing message that reads “Good news! Today your [item] pin from [company] is [discount]% less.” The message is followed with a “See Pin” call to action button and “Happy Pinning!”

Using rich pins is limited to movies, recipes, products and articles at this time. The products category is the only one that includes pricing making it eligible for the sale email notifications. Participation is free, but it requires oEmbed or semantic markup on your website for information collection purposes.

Non-Profits
Helping others is good for business. Non-profits have supporters that may not be familiar with your company. You have customers that may not be familiar with specific non-profits. Partnering with these organizations increases awareness of their cause and your company.

When partnering with non-profits, create multichannel messages that benefit all participants. One approach is offering a discount coupon when someone donates a minimum amount to the non-profit. Make it appealing to supporters by offering savings greater than the amount donated. Your objective is to gain new customers that will stay with your company. Monitoring the activity of newly acquired customers after the initial purchase validates the partnership. If you are acquiring hit & run shoppers, a different non-profit may be a better choice.

Publications
Keeping up in a high demand for original content arena is challenging. Partnering with publications, online and off, works well for companies that offer informational products. Create mini-guides from your larger offerings that can be given to readers.

Choose partners with content that matches your products well. Offering to host the distribution of the mini-guides gives you the opportunity to capture email addresses. (Test with and without gating to see which works best.)

Educational Organizations
Companies offering products that appeal to students or parents can partner with campuses to increase exposure and capture new customers. Credit card companies have this process down to a science. Learn from their processes so you can appeal to the people participating.

Choose to partner with campuses that offer degrees in the fields that match your product line. For example, if your company sells teacher supplies, choose a campus that teaches education. Giveaways, sweepstakes, and contests work well for students. Design them to appeal to the students and open the door for a long-term relationship.

Non-Competitive Businesses
No company offers everything people need to live their life. Test partnering with companies that offer complementary products. This introduces your company to people who are highly targeted. In return, your participation provides reciprocal information.

Monitor all messaging to insure that your partner’s communications are consistent with yours. Create an agreement that includes limits and the ability to verify accuracy in the information exchange. Choose partners carefully because you don’t want to provide your customer information to a potential competitor.

How ‘Frienemy Marketing’ Can Save Your Online (and Offline) Business

With the economic climate as crazy as it’s been, now more than ever businesses large and small are looking for creative ways to increase visibility, sales and leads. One effective way is to leverage the relationships with your ‘friendly’ competition. By friendly, I mean synergistic and respected formidable adversaries with a like-minded community of followers to your own.

With the economic climate as crazy as it’s been, now more than ever businesses large and small are looking for creative ways to increase visibility, sales and leads.

One effective way is to leverage the relationships with your ‘friendly’ competition. By friendly, I mean synergistic and respected formidable adversaries with a like-minded community of followers to your own.

You can look to this niche for opportunities to help grow your list and add extra revenues to your bottom line. Even better, this can be done for virtually no out-of-pocket cost.

This is a great way to leverage your content and increase market share, enhance brand awareness, grow sales and leads, and establish credibility with a new, yet synergistic list.

As a consultant, and even back in the days when I was leading the marketing efforts at top publishers, it’s important for me to be “strategically creative” and deploy as many no-cost online marketing tactics as possible for greater return on investment (ROI).

I like to concentrate on the marketing and editorial relationships I have forged with fellow publishers and aggressively pursue ad swaps, guest editorials and joint ventures (JV). I’ll explain a little more about these three opportunities in a moment.

With “frienemy marketing,” the idea is to develop synergistic relationships that are mutually beneficial—to look for areas of deficiency in your competitors and think of ways your company can fill the void.

One potential partner may have a great front-end product (e.g., a low cost e-book) but no up-sell (e.g., a higher-priced related kit containing DVDs, CDs and workbooks). Another potential partner may have an innovative back-end product but no cost-effective front-end product to bring new customers in the door. Still others may have large, qualified lists but need editorial to bond with their lists.

Some tips to keep in mind when looking for partnerships with friendly competitors:

Do your homework. Find out, in advance, who will be at industry events that you’ll be attending. (Check the program for speakers, vendors and participants.) Sign up for their e-newsletters. Read their promotional emails. Maybe even purchase some of their products.

Look at EVERY opportunity as a way to maximize your company’s brand during presentation breaks, lunch time and cocktail parties. When you go to industry events, don’t eat dinner alone in your hotel room. Go to functions. Mingle. Network. Have a genuine conversation with a potential partner … then, if there’s a synergy between your two companies, exchange business cards.

Before you contact a potential partner, get familiar with his products and target audience and figure out how your company may be able to dovetail with his product line or marketing efforts.

So, once you’ve made the connection, now what? You need to look at potential marketing and editorial opportunities …

Ad swaps are a form of revenue sharing. Typically, this can be a text or graphic ad two publishers place in each other’s e-newsletters and each keep 100 percent of the sales they get from their respective ads, no strings attached. Other things to know: Both list sizes should be close in circulation size, hence the reciprocity. You both keep any sales or email addresses collected, and call it a day. Know your “opportunity cost”—the “cost” you will incur for running an outside ad to your list instead of your own ad. If you normally sell ad space in your e-newsletter, this cost could simply be the flat rate fee you typically charge. Or, if you know the average revenues an issue brings in, you could calculate the potential “missed opportunity” of letting another ad run to your list on a given day. You should also agree to share important information with your partner. Before his ad runs in your e-newsletter, point out any creative issues. Provide your partner with your e-newsletter’s sent and deliverability sizes, open rate and ad click rate. Exchanging performance data is critical to a long and mutually beneficial relationship. It has to be a win/win situation for the partnership to work.

Guest editorials are offering content (editorial) that is relevant and targeted for an external publication and reciprocate. This is a great way to get introduced to a new list with the “implied” endorsement of the publisher. His endorsement gives you credibility. And if you provide his readers with good, solid, useful information, they will bond with you quickly.

This is a soft-sell approach that may or may not yield results on its own. At the end or beginning of the article is an Editorial Note or Byline, which can have author attribution, back-link to your website and short sentence for cross-selling, which help with sales, traffic generation and link-building efforts.

Joint ventures are similar to affiliate relationships, with the difference that instead of an affiliate program that is openly marketed, this relationship is more personal—it’s usually a company that you’ve built and cultivated a relationship with and are looking forward to a variety of ongoing business ventures down the road. There’s more of a vested interest. This is a quick and cost-effective way to make money with your list even if you have not yet developed any products.

To determine the viability of a potential JV product, there are several strategic marketing variables to consider. I like to think of them as “PPPGS”:

P = Product quality
P = Price point
P = Performance (when promoted to your potential partner’s house list, as well as to outside lists)
G = General market demand
S = Subscriber interest (when promoted to your list, as determined by feedback, surveys, etc.)

Remember, with “frienemy marketing” you’re looking for long-term partners, not one-hit-wonders. So carefully select the people you approach, making sure their products, brand and message make sense to your business … and, together, you can reap the unlimited profit potential of this underutilized business builder.

Can You Capitalize on DIY?

If high-end Swarovski Crystal and YouTube marketer Dynomighty can hit home runs with the same marketing strategy, it’s something every online marketer should think about. The strategy in question is do-it-yourself (DIY) community marketing. DIY projects get popular with consumers when times are tight, and are they ever tight now. These very different marketers are both benefitting from the buzz, brand interaction and organic customer rewards that DIY communities create.

If high-end Swarovski Crystal and YouTube marketer Dynomighty can hit home runs with the same marketing strategy, it’s something every online marketer should think about. The strategy in question is do-it-yourself (DIY) community marketing. DIY projects get popular with consumers when times are tight, and are they ever tight now. These very different marketers are both benefitting from the buzz, brand interaction and organic customer rewards that DIY communities create.

Last week I mentioned Dynomighty, which has had great success with earnest, compelling YouTube marketing. The other thing Dynomighty’s hit on is DIY marketing for its Mighty Wallet. The Mighty Wallet is made from Tyvek (often used in express mail envelopes), which, along with being nigh indestructible, is easily written on and decorated. In fact, Dynomighty sells the wallets in various blank colors (in addition to a ton of designs) for buyers to decorate themselves DIY-style, and encourages them through The DIY Mighty Wallet competition on its Facebook page. The first contest has already been won, another one’s launching June 15.

Dynomighty’s DIY contest reinforces a product benefit — the ability to customize its wallets — to get users to follow its Facebook page, and encourages them to make something they’ll want to show to friends. All for the cost of the creative and a $500 shopping spree. That’s great for a small, gorilla e-marketer like Dynomighty, but luxury crystal brand Swarovski Crystal is doing the same thing in a more formal, international way befitting its own reputation.

Create Your Style with Crystalized – Swarovski Elements is Swarovski’s international DIY blitz that combines in-store demonstrations, contests, conventions, tie-in products (namely crystal jewelry design books), social media marketing and other initiatives to promote the Crystalized line of DIY jewelry supplies. From its Facebook page:

“CREATE YOUR STYLE is the global creative community of CRYSTALLIZED™ — Swarovski Elements, the ultimate crystal brand. It connects like-minded people with a passion for expressing themselves through personal design. CREATE YOUR STYLE has devoted itself to the creation of an inspiring and interactive platform where crystal aficionados from all over the world can exchange creative ideas and obtain advice from experts while getting design and style tips as well as information on international competitions and whatever else their creative heart desires!”

The Swarovski product line is specifically made for DIYers, but the strategy is very similar to what Dynomighty is doing: Promote social networks based on the exploration of your product’s benefits, create product evangelists and reward consumers for interacting with your brand. Swarovski puts a lot more money into its program, but both are attracting followers.

It’s a tactic that can be applied to many products at varying levels of resource commitment. If you sell shoes or clothing, challenge customers to customize fashions. If you sell electronics, build a community around installation and optimization. If you sell collectibles, share techniques for users to make their own, and offer supplies to do so. When your product becomes a hobby, enthusiasts become more committed to your brand and they’ll try to spread that fever to like-minded individuals. DIY is really a breed of highly contagious viral marketing.

How can you create a DIY movement among your customers?