Healthcare Marketers, Start Your Push for Annual Wellness Visits Now

As we enter the fall, healthcare marketers should be starting their push for Medicare enrollees to schedule an Annual Wellness Visit. Unlike an appointment for a specific ailment, the Annual Wellness Visit is a longer-than-usual appointment, centered on a conversation between patient and provider.

As we enter the fall, healthcare marketers should be starting their push for Medicare enrollees to schedule an Annual Wellness Visit.

Unlike an appointment for a specific ailment, the Annual Wellness Visit is a longer-than-usual appointment, centered on a conversation between patient and provider. Self-reported issues, such as feelings of depression or cognition difficulty, coupled with direct observations by the provider, allow for better monitoring of concerns, as well as a more complete clinical record.

This matters to health plans with Medicare Advantage enrollees, as well as provider groups who care for them, because better documentation means a more accurate risk-score assigned to the individual enrollee. Patients with multiple conditions often require more extensive monitoring than healthier patients. In recognition of that additional effort, the federal government applies a risk-score adjustment to the fixed monthly payment (capitation) paid to the Medicare Advantage plan. This is intended to encourage care management interventions that can improve the patient’s health.

Medicare Advantage plans, in turn, often offer bonuses to medical groups and providers that have a high percentage of completed Annual Wellness Visits among eligible patients. If your organization has a large number of Medicare patients, you’ll generally find that at least one-third of them are enrolled through a Medicare Advantage plan. The incentive revenue to your organization from the health plan for completed Annual Wellness Visits can be significant.

Although the risk-adjustment model of payment applies only to Medicare Advantage plans, the Annual Wellness Visit itself is a covered benefit for all Medicare patients.

There are three challenges when promoting Annual Wellness Visits:

  • Encouraging a person to see their provider when they are feeling fine. In general, people go to the doctor when they have a specific medical complaint. In contrast, the Annual Wellness Visit is not a visit for diagnosis and treatment, but for a conversation that leads to improved care on subsequent visits. Annual Wellness Visits can be performed by a physician, nurse practitioner, registered dietician, or other medical professionals under a doctor’s supervision.
  • Ensuring the patient knows to ask for an Annual Wellness Visit rather a different type of visit when making the appointment. This matters, because Annual Wellness Visits are longer than other types of appointments, so the number of available scheduling slots may be fewer. Annual Wellness Visits also have no co-pays from the patient, but the patient will be asked for a co-pay if the appointment is incorrectly classified.
  • Communicating urgency to make the appointment before end-of-year. Although a patient can take advantage of this annual benefit on a rolling 12-month calendar, the provider has to log the appointment by close-of-business on December 31 for it to impact upcoming risk-adjusted payments. (Thus, any incentives offered by the plan to your organization also will have a 12/31 cut-off.)

Despite these challenges, promotion of Annual Wellness Visits can benefit patients, plans, and providers, alike.

The Post One-to-One Era of Marketing?

Over the past few years, several people have said to me, “Wow, with all this technology, you can finally put the right marketing message in front of the right person at the right time. That’s truly one-to-one. That’s living the dream!” … But is that still the dream in 2017?

Over the past few years, several people have said to me, “Wow, with all this technology, you can finally put the right marketing message in front of the right person at the right time. That’s truly one-to-one. That’s living the dream!” … But is that still the dream in 2017?

Last week I was at the Engagement Marketing Executive Symposium hosted by Ricoh, and I got to hear Carla Johnson talking about the book she’s  written with Robert Rose: “Experiences: The 7th Era of Marketing.” In the presentation, she laid out the whole history of marketing in the six “eras” we’ve been through so far:

  1. The Trade Era: 1850s to 1900s focused on where you can buy the product, because distribution was very limited.
  2. The Production Era: 1900s to 1920s focused on quality of the product and dangers of other products.
  3. The Sales Era: 1920s-1940s focused on making a sales argument and price, highly influenced by “How to Win Friends and Influence People.”
  4. The Marketing Department Era: 1940s to 1950s, focused on promotion of product benefits.
  5. The Marketing Company Era: 1960s to 1990s was the high “Mad Men” era, focused on brand. Think the Pepsi Challenge and Apple’s iconic ads.
  6. The Relationship Era: 1990s to 2015, one-to-one marketing highly influenced by the books “The One to One Future” and “The Cluetrain Manifesto.”

Out of these eras, Johnson said the first four represent the classic four Ps of marketing: Place, Price, Product and Promotion. Then we see the development of the commercial mass-media era, followed by the rise of modern direct marketing.

Looked at this way, I can certainly see a progression. The question is, are we now past the one-to-one era? It feels like we just recently found the technologies to actualize the ideas Peppers and Rogers wrote about, but have those techs already missed the boat?

Well, if all this personalized digital marketing was loved by the masses, would we be seeing both Apple and Google add built-in ad blockers to their web browsers? Or laws like CASL and GDPR threatening access to data and channels we use to reach one-to-one?

Clearly, consumers are having a bad experience with these kinds of marketing. In theory, very good one-to-one marketing should always be relevant and a pleasure for the audience to receive. In practice,  lot of marketing that’s meant to one-to-one is actually one-to-none, and nobody wants to engage with it.

The only way to fix a bad experience is to start offering a good one, and that’s where the seventh era comes in:

7. The Experience Era: 2015 to the future, experiences “transform” business through customer-centricity.

Where the one-to-one era was built around direct, personalized communication, the experience era is built on providing an experience around your brand that your target audiences will choose to engage with. It’s the art of marketing without interrupting; the art of opt-in engagement.

Is that the era you feel like we’re in?

One thing’s for sure: We can’t keep frustrating the audience and expecting them to be happy to see us.

 

Measuring Customer Engagement: It’s Not Easy and It Takes Time

Here’s what’s easy: Measuring the effect of individual engagements like Web page views, email opens, paid and organic search clicks, call center interactions, Facebook likes, Twitter follows, tweets, retweets, referrals, etc. Here’s what’s hard: Understanding the combined effect of your promotions across all those channels. Many marketers turn to online attribution methods to assign credit for all or part of an individual order across multiple online channels. es as the independent variables.

Here’s what’s easy: Measuring the effect of individual engagements like Web page views, email opens, paid and organic search clicks, call center interactions, Facebook likes, Twitter follows, tweets, retweets, referrals, etc.

Here’s what’s hard: Understanding the combined effect of your promotions across all those channels.

Many marketers turn to online attribution methods to assign credit for all or part of an individual order across multiple online channels. Digital marketing guru Avinash Kaushik points out the strengths of weaknesses of various methods in his blog, Occam’s Razor in “Multichannel Attribution: Definitions, Models and a Reality Check” and concludes that none are perfect and many are far from it.

But online attribution models look to give credit to an individual tactic rather than measuring the combined effects of your entire promotion mix. Here’s a different approach to getting a holistic view of your entire promotion mix. It’s similar to the methodology I discussed in the post “Use Market Research to Tie Brand Awareness and Purchase Intent to Sales,” and like that methodology, it’s not something you’re going to be able to do overnight. It’s an iterative process that will take some time.

Start by assigning a point value to every consumer touch and every consumer action to create an engagement score for each customer. This process will be different for every marketer and will vary according to your customer base and your promotion mix. For illustration’s sake, consider the arbitrary assignments in the table in the media player, at right.

Next, perform this preliminary analysis:

  1. Rank your customers on sales volume for different time periods
    —previous month, quarter, year, etc.
  2. Rank your customers on their engagement score for the same periods
  3. Examine the correlation between sales and engagement
    —How much is each point of engagement worth in sales $$$?

After you’ve done this preliminary scoring, do your best to isolate customers who were not exposed to specific elements of the promotion mix into control groups, i.e., they didn’t engage on Facebook or they didn’t receive email. Compare their revenue against the rest of the file to see how well you’ve weighted that particular element. With several iterations of this process over time, you will be able to place a dollar value on each point of engagement and plan your promotion mix accordingly.

How you assign your point values may seem arbitrary at first, but you will need to work through this iteratively, looking at control cells wherever you can isolate them. For a more scientific approach, run a regression analysis on the customer file with revenue as the dependent variable and the number and types of touches as the independent variables. The more complete your customer contact data is, the lower your p value and the more descriptive the regression will be in identifying the contribution of each element.

As with any methodology, this one is only as good as the data you’re able to put into it, but don’t be discouraged if your data is not perfect or complete. Even in an imperfect world, this exercise will get you closer to a holistic view of customer engagement.

How Big Is Your Halo? 3 Ways to Measure the Branding Effect of Your Direct Promotions

Direct marketers take pride in accountability. But as I’ve said before, they can be their own worst enemies when it comes to measurement. They’re good at measuring things that are easy to count—clicks, page views, response rates, cost per lead, etc. But they struggle with measuring the long-term or cumulative effects that the branding in their promotions has on current and future sales—people who buy, but not as a result of a specific promotion, the so-called halo effect.

Direct marketers take pride in accountability. But as I’ve said before, they can be their own worst enemies when it comes to measurement. They’re good at measuring things that are easy to count—clicks, page views, response rates, cost per lead, etc.

But they struggle with measuring the long-term or cumulative effects that the branding in their promotions has on current and future sales—people who buy, but not as a result of a specific promotion, the so-called halo effect.

Consider big direct marketing brands like 1-800-Flowers.com or Omaha Steaks. These brand names have been built through direct marketing promotions over time and, as a result, people self-direct to their Web and phone sales channels.

But most direct marketers don’t know how to account for this halo effect, and when they work with response rates only, at best, they shortchange their results; and at worst, they get fooled by failing to account for those who buy without responding.

Case in point: A few years ago, I analyzed a data set from a multivariate direct mail matrix test that had 12 cells: four list segments, four offers and four creative executions.

Working off of response rates alone, we identified the winning list segment, offer and creative. But digging deeper by matching the solicitation file to the sales file, we discovered that from a revenue-per-prospect standpoint, these response rate winners were not the best revenue producers. Further analysis showed that from an ROI standpoint, they were actually the worst. In fact, the offer with the highest response rate (a free trial) produced a negative ROI when compared with a control cell: People in the control group who did not receive this offer actually spent more than the ones who responded to the offer for a free trial.

Here are three ways you can account for the halo effect:

1. Compare customer sales data to your promotion history. This is a good starting point. See who was exposed to your promotions and purchased without responding

2. Index brand awareness to sales over time. Take a look at this post for a methodology to measure this metric.

3. Create an engagement score that counts brand exposures and index it to sales over time. More on a methodology to measure this metric next time.

Augmented Reality, Wearable Electronics and the Postal Service’s Future

In my previous blog post, I commented on the United States Postal Service and its announced plans for five-day delivery, discussing the importance of hard-copy communication and a commitment to deliver such communication on a daily basis. In extending this commentary, I claim no nostalgia for daily mail delivery, rather simply recognition that such communication has its unique position as a vehicle for superb brand engagement. The Postal Service is not standing still in the digital age.

In my previous blog post, I commented on the United States Postal Service and its announced plans for five-day delivery, discussing the importance of hard-copy communication and a commitment to deliver such communication on a daily basis. In extending this commentary, I claim no nostalgia for daily mail delivery, rather simply recognition that such communication has its unique position as a vehicle for superb brand engagement.

The Postal Service is not standing still in the digital age.

Last October, when the Postal Service announced its intention to raise rates this past January, it also announced its schedule for postage promotions through 2013. And in the mix is a bevy of technology-driven, multichannel “positioning” of direct mail that leverages mobile and interactive channels.

Discounts
Look at this selected line-up from the USPS promotion calendar:

  • March-April 2013: Mobile Coupon/Click-to-Call
    This promotion seeks to increase the value of direct mail by further highlighting the integration of mail with mobile technology in two specific ways. First, the promotion would encourage mailers to integrate hard-copy coupons in the mail with mobile-optimized platforms for redemption. Second, the promotion will drive consumer awareness, and increased usage, of mail containing mobile barcodes with “click-to-call” functionality.

    Provides a 2-percent discount on the qualifying postage for First-Class Mail and Standard Mail presort or automation letters, postcards and flats sent during the established program period that include a two dimensional mobile barcode inside or on the mailpiece. The barcode must either lead the recipient to a coupon that can be stored on a mobile device, or enable the recipient to connect by telephone to another person or call center via a mobile device.

  • August-September 2013: Emerging Technology
    This promotion is designed to build on the successes of past mobile barcode promotions by promoting awareness of how innovative technology—such as near-field communication, augmented reality and authentication—can be integrated with a direct mail strategy to enhance the value of direct mail.

    Provide a 2-percent discount on the qualifying postage for First-Class Mail and Standard Mail presort or automation letters, postcards, and flats that are sent during the established program period and include print that allows the recipient to engage in one of the following:

    • an augmented reality experience facilitated by a smartphone or computer,
    • authentication of the recipient’s identity, or
    • an experience facilitated via Near Field Communication.

To receive the discount, mailers must comply with the eligibility requirements of the program.

  • November-December 2013: Mobile Buy-it-Now
    This promotion will encourage mailers to adopt and invest in technologies that enhance how consumers interact and engage with mail, and demonstrate how direct mail can be a convenient method for consumers to do their holiday shopping.

    Provides a 2-percent discount on the qualifying postage for First-Class Mail and Standard Mail presort or automation letters, postcards, and flats which include a mobile barcode inside or on the mailpiece that facilitates a mobile optimized shopping experience. To receive the discount, the qualifying mail must be sent during the established program period by mailers that comply with the eligibility requirements of the program

Augmented Reality
Next, in January during the media-frenzy of Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, this Venture Beat post appeared, reporting on a USPS mobile app that uses “augmented reality” (subject of the August-September 2013 promotion) to integrate direct mail promotions with interactive programming on a mobile device and give recipients an enhanced digital experience with the mail piece. In augmented reality, a physical ad and an interactive ad comes together by way of an app, developed by Aurasma, rather than a QR Code. Augmented reality can be applied to any visual cues.

The apps keep coming. Associated Press then reported that Val-Pak, the company that sends blue envelopes stuffed with coupons, also wants consumer households to save money while driving. Valpak has partnered with Roximity, a Denver-based app developer, to bring coupons and deals to drivers of newer-model Fords and Lincolns who use the voice-controlled Sync AppLink connected to their mobile phone. The app allows people to hear about personalized deals from stores, restaurants and other businesses as they drive. The “coupon” appears on the driver’s smartphone and can be redeemed once the car is stopped.

Wearable Electronics
And how can you keep it all connected—the mail, the apps, the augmented reality, the mobile coupons? Why through wearable electronics, of course, article courtesy of The Atlantic Wire. The fashion verdict may be out, but the Postal Service is clearly thinking hard on how to keep mail relevant in an increasingly digital—and mobile—age.

I still maintain that the six or seven direct mail pieces I receive a day are precious real estate. They represent a tiny portion of the thousands of advertisements and brand “touches” I’m exposed to each and every day. Yet this is advertising that is largely targeted, and one with which I have a tactile experience—reading, responding, recycling as I deem appropriate. This is a powerful consideration, one that I certainly pay closer attention to. Will I be running to the app store to integrate this experience with my smartphone? Not anytime soon, but a hoodie for my iPod, ThinkPad and Samsung to tote and plug into would be nice.