6 Google Ads Trends You Should Be Using in Your Marketing

Google Ads, formerly AdWords, has been a mainstay of PPC marketing since its introduction in 2000. Businesses now have access to new tools that allow them to refine their PPC marketing and generate more leads. Make sure your campaigns are taking advantage of the most popular Google Ads trends.

Google Ads, formerly AdWords, has been a mainstay of PPC marketing since its introduction in 2000. A lot has changed over the last 19 years, and businesses now have access to new tools that allow them to refine their PPC marketing and generate more leads. Make sure your campaigns are taking advantage of 2019’s most popular Google Ads trends.

2019 Google Ads Trends

1. Personalization

Personalizing your Google Ads means relying on the insights gleaned from your visitors to refine your ads toward specific audiences. Learn to match ads back to specific landing pages, which lets your visitors understand the relevancy of the page relating to the ad they just clicked. That helps reinforce the impact of your branding strategy, along with your message.

Use tools like geo customizers that pinpoint a visitor’s location or a place they are looking to visit. You can also upload your lists of emails into Google’s Customer Match product to help direct ads from your campaign at specific audiences.

2. Optimize for Voice Search

With 55% of households expected to own some speech-enabled device, voice search must be accounted for when designing your ads for campaigns. When users issue commands into apps powered by Alexa or Siri, they speak in more natural patterns that do not conform to standard keyword patterns.

Instead of keywords, center ad content around accurately responding to user questions. If they ask, “Where is the nearest Mexican restaurant,” ads that highlight Mexican cuisine near their location should be what appear. Clarity takes precedent over conciseness when it comes to voice search.

That does not mean that marketers should abandon keywords entirely. They should, however, focus on longer-tailed keywords that allow for more natural phrasing. Keywords no longer have to fall into a specific pattern, thanks to the advancement in algorithms used by Google.

3. Write for Your Audience, Not Keywords

The Google Ads interface now allows you to drill down and target audiences based on demographics, the reason why they may be making a purchase, and many other patterns. That means leaning less on keywords and more on gearing your ads toward items of interest to your audience.

With the array of tools now at a marketer’s disposal, keywords will decrease in importance, making it vital that marketers put in the work to truly understand what their visitors desire. That will help them design better quality ads that can elevate their conversion rates.

4. Make Use of Smart Campaigns

Google Ads users now have the option of creating “Smart Campaigns.” They simplify ad creation by making it easier for marketers and small businesses to target specific audiences. You include the address of your business, images, and other information into Google Ads templates that automatically accounts for your CTR and CVR.

Google algorithms take over and locate audiences fitting your information. You keep your volumes growing without having to do a lot of hands-on configuration.

5. Gear Ads Toward Remarketing

You can keep visitors interested in your site offerings by designing ads full of products or services in which they expressed interest. It is a matter of adding a small piece of code to your website that captures information about your visitor’s attention. You can use that information to create ads aimed at bringing them back to your site.

6. Tie Ads Back to In-Store Offerings

Localizing your Google Ads can help drive customers into your physical stores. Many people do research online when looking for goods or services. Design ads that feature inventory in your store and whether you currently have it in stock. That can motivate customers to go ahead and visit your store to make a purchase.

Summing It All Up

  • Personalize your ads to appeal to specific audiences
  • Account for voice search when designing ads
  • Think beyond keywords when creating ads for your audience
  • Maximize the benefits of Google Ads Smart Campaigns
  • Build ads targeted at previous visitors to your website
  • Use Google Ads to promote your in-store offerings.

Keep an eye out for more changes to Google Ads that will likely impact your campaigns for 2020.

What Google’s New AdWords Phone Number and Address Targeting Mean for You

Just in time for the holidays, Google delivered a huge gift to business owners who haven’t been gathering email addresses from customers.

google adwordsJust in time for the holidays, Google delivered a huge gift to business owners who haven’t been gathering email addresses from customers.

Google AdWords now allows businesses to use their customers’ addresses and phone numbers to target them with ad campaigns. Previously, this perk of the AdWords Customer Match system only worked with email addresses. Now, businesses with years’ worth of customer information not including emails can get far more mileage from the AdWords platform.

You might be wondering, “Who doesn’t collect email addresses from customers?” While collecting email addresses seems like common sense nowadays, it wasn’t a big deal for businesses that focused on newspaper, radio and local TV advertising.

Additionally, brick-and-mortar businesses generally don’t collect email addresses as thoroughly as online retailers. It has become second nature for online shoppers to offer up their email addresses to get email coupons or complete online checkouts. People who routinely give their email addresses online might react differently when asked for their emails in person.

This change to Google’s Customer Match system helps level the playing field. Business owners who have loads of customer data, but not email addresses, can now launch remarketing campaigns that are often cheaper and more effective than standard pay-per-click ads.

What Is Remarketing?

Remarketing is one of the most powerful tools in the AdWords toolbox. Simply put, remarketing is when you target an advertisement at people who’ve already shown interest in your business. A remarketing audience could include people who’ve visited certain pages of your website (you’d compile these lists using HTML code snippets or with Google Analytics). Remarketing audiences could also include people who’ve placed items in virtual shopping cards or completed online purchases.

Why does remarketing matter? For starters, it allows you to personalize your campaigns toward certain groups of customers. You can pitch sales to shoppers who showed interest in specific goods and services, or you can rekindle interest in people who browsed your website. You can also use remarketing to reconnect with customers who’ve gone several months without contact. There are too many possibilities to list here.

More importantly, remarketing campaigns typically convert at a much higher rate than standard AdWords campaigns. Customers who see remarketing ads become less likely to click with each viewing; however, those who do click are twice as likely to convert! That’s according to Wordstream, a marketing software company that published its finding in spring 2017.

Thanks to the changes to the Customer Match system, small business owners don’t need to collect digital data from customers to reap the benefits of remarketing.

Are These Customer Match Changes Too Personal?

You don’t need to worry about Google using your customers’ information for its own money-making purposes. How Google uses this data is strictly laid out on its website.

For starters, only customers who’ve entered their names, phone numbers and addresses into Google accounts (such as Gmail) can be targeted with the Customer Match system. They won’t see your remarketing campaigns if they haven’t already willingly given their personal data to Google.

Your Prospects Are Multichannel. Are You?

in order to engage, we must go to the watering holes where our customers and prospects hang out. We have to be in the channels they frequent, in addition to having relevant content for them to consume and share.

Last month on our Revenue Marketing journey, we discussed content marketing strategy and the steps to developing the best content editorial calendar. This month, let’s talk about channels for multichannel distribution of your content.

If you have a “field of dreams” wherein, if you create great content and put it on your website, somehow, “they will come …” well, good luck with that. The reality is that, in order to engage, we must go to the watering holes where our customers and prospects hang out. We have to be in the channels they frequent in addition to having relevant content for them to consume and share.

Ask Your Customers What Channels They Use

We have many clients who simply don’t believe their customers are on Facebook. So, we upload 5000 of their business email addresses to Facebook and show them the result: Usually a 65 percent match rate for business email addresses. Business people are on Facebook and they “hang out there” every day:

  • 63 percent of Facebook users are age 30 and older
  • Facebook has more than 1 billion visitors per day
  • Facebook has many more video views than YouTube

I only bring this up to highlight that our assumptions about which channels are best for reaching our customers may be wrong. The best thing you can do is ask your customers. The next best thing to do is to experiment with multiple channels and see which ones currently work best for your firm.

No doubt you noticed I didn’t even mention email yet. Yes, it is a channel, perhaps the one you are most accustomed to using. And it is easy and inexpensive. But it should not be the only channel you use. Increasingly there are issues with:

  • Information overload in inboxes so your communication gets lost
  • Automatic “junk” designation and filtering
  • Spam traps (so you decide to do an ABM campaign to 250 contacts at your biggest customer and you email all of them at once…guess what is going to happen.)

My point is that your attempts to engage your audience will be better if you use multiple channels to nurture them. Upload the email addresses in Facebook, LinkedIn and other channels, establish a connection to your contacts through these channels, and start sharing content over them.

Syndicate Your Content

Syndicate and promote are becoming synonymous today because organic social is pretty much defunct. You have to boost or promote your content to your audiences or targeted marketing groups.

For video, it’s simple; YouTube is owned by Google. They have 77 percent of the search market. Since videos are quickly becoming the hottest form of content, it makes sense to place it where it will be found. If you have a podcast, use a podcasting hosting site such as Libsyn to set up your audio RSS feed. This feed can then be used on podcast distribution platforms such as iTunes, Google Play and Stitcher to ensure your audience can access your show regardless of which mobile device they use. Set up a podcast promotion plan for your social media sites as well to drive new listeners to your episodes.

Look for Multichannel and Cross-Device Remarketing Opportunities

Multi-channel and cross-device remarketing are really hot right now. I would suggest adding in some reference or weaving in some of that in this section. The following is an example of a multi-channel campaign.

Let’s say you are going to run a webinar next month. What should that campaign design include in terms of channels:

  • One to three emailed invitations and a few variations of follow up emails
  • Up to three impressions per person promotion in Facebook image ads
  • Blog post promoting the webinar on your blog
  • Promoted blog post on LinkedIn, Facebook and a promoted tweet
  • Facebook media ad — video promoting webinar
  • Retargeting campaign to known contacts in Facebook and Twitter
  • Lookalike campaign in Facebook
What a campaign design document could look like.
What a campaign design document could look like.

Hopefully this example makes it clear that your campaign design document has to be very clear on all the channels for a promotion. The graphic and copy (assets) needs vary by channel, and the logistics for lining up all these assets at the same time are much more complex than when you are simply using a single channel such as email. But the results for going multi-channel will be much better of course.

Track Everything

If you have content on your website and you point to it from other online digital content you control, your blog for instance, you can and should be tracking all those clicks by content type and channel. But when creating links to your content from digital properties you cannot fully control, or with embedded links in documents you share, ensure you use UTM codes with the links.

UTM codes were formulated to track channel and content performance. Make sure you use them religiously on all links on ads and promotions and in embedded links in documents. Set up a shared Google doc or spreadsheet to automatically generate UTM codes for your team with an approved picklist of values for Medium and Source. Minify the links to ensure their integrity before using them. Here is an example, a link to a white paper on strategic planning and budgeting for marketing. It goes without saying that you use your Marketing Automation Platform (MAP) form capabilities to grab the UTMs and save them in the contact record.

Use a tag manager, and make sure you “pixel” visitors to your content no matter where they found the link. That way to can add them to your “pixeled” database of unknown but interested parties and do promotions to them through Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

By tracking everything you will gradually start to learn which channels and content work best for you to attract visitors to your website and drive revenue.

Next month, we will continue the Revenue Marketing journey conversation, and focus on the marketing technology stack.

Please feel free to share your experiences with content marketing strategy and other insights on the above topics in the comments section below or email me at kevin@pedowitzgroup.com.

6 Tips for a Successful Remarketing Campaign

Who has a better chance of becoming a paying customer — a random user who is searching for relevant goods and services, or someone who was one click away from actually making a purchase on your website? The answer to this question is why remarketing is such a powerful tool in Google AdWords.

Who has a better chance of becoming a paying customer — a random user who is searching for relevant goods and services, or someone who was one click away from actually making a purchase on your website? The answer to this question is why remarketing is such a powerful tool in Google AdWords.

Your chances of scoring conversions (and improving your ROI) rises significantly among shoppers who’ve already confirmed their interests in your business.

Setting up remarketing campaigns is easy and fairly straightforward. But like any other aspect of online advertising, you won’t get the most from remarketing unless you pay close attention to the details. Read on for six tips for boosting the success of your remarketing campaigns.

1. Start with Top-Performing Campaigns

A full-scale plunge into remarketing could significantly increase your AdWords costs. For the best ROI while minimizing cost increases, consider focusing your remarketing efforts on your top-performing campaigns.

This is the lowest hanging fruit because you know your offer works and it’s just a matter of squeezing more conversions out of the campaign. Then, once you gain more experience, expand to other campaigns in your account.

2. Don’t Be Afraid to Bid Aggressively

A Wordstream study found that, although remarketing click-through rates declined over time, conversion rates nearly doubled among shoppers who viewed ads twice! That’s a huge bump, and it’s worth bidding more than what you’d pay for typical ad placements.

Remember, with remarketing you’re showing your ads to prospects who already expressed interest in your product or service.  This tends to lead to higher conversion rates and lower cost per sale.

Of course, not all website visitors should be treated equally. Prioritize and bid more aggressively for the visitors who made it further down the sales funnel.  For example, a visitor who made it to the order form and then left is more likely to convert via remarketing than a visitor who left the site after reading just one page.

3. Make Remarketing Campaigns for Known Customers

Remarketing is great for connecting with interested shoppers, but don’t forget about actual customers. You can specifically target people who’ve made purchases or requested more information. Do this with tailor-made campaigns that advertise new goods and services.

Remarketing is also a great way to inform your known customers about sales, discounts and other special offers. These campaigns are more likely to resonate with people who’ve already built up trust in your business.

4. Take Advantage of Broad Keywords

Broad-match terms are often viewed as the kryptonite of keyword lists. They’re vague and nonspecific. They’ll get you a ton of traffic for cheap, but a good chunk of that traffic won’t be from interested shoppers.

Unless it’s a remarketing campaign!

Broad-match keywords are fantastic with remarketing, because you’re only targeting interested shoppers. For example, if you owned a house painting business, normally you wouldn’t want to use “paint” as a keyword because you’d get too much irrelevant traffic from other searches. (The top related searches for “paint” on Google include “paint games,” “paint Microsoft” and “paint app.”)

However, if you’re targeting people who’ve already shown interest in your business, then you don’t need to worry so much about them finding you again with a paint-related search — even if it’s not entirely relevant.

Taking advantage of cheaper broad-match keywords can re-engage shoppers more quickly and at reduced costs.

5. Offer Special Discounts to Shopping Cart Bouncers

There are all kinds of reasons why people leave websites without buying what’s in their shopping carts. Sometimes, people just get busy or distracted. Other times, they may have second thoughts. Whatever the reason, these folks were, at one point, just a quick checkout away from becoming paying customers.

Thanks to remarketing, you can target ads specifically toward shoppers who bailed from your shopping cart page. Why not incentivize them to finish what they started by offering them an attractive coupon?

6. Don’t Pester Shoppers

Remarketing is a great tool for engaging with interested shoppers, but put yourself in the consumer’s perspective. What do you feel when you’re bombarded with the same ads either online or on TV? Chances are, you don’t like it. Neither does your advertising audience.

Fortunately, you can avoid this by adjusting the duration and frequency capping settings within your remarketing campaigns. The duration is how long your ads follow each shopper. With frequency capping, you can set how many times a person sees your remarketing ads per day or per week or per month.

Conclusion

Remarketing is a powerful tool for putting your ads in front of shoppers who you already know are interested in what you’re selling. To be able to communicate directly with these potential customers is a huge advantage, and that’s reflected by generally higher CTRs and conversion rates among remarketing campaigns.

That said, remarketing is not guaranteed to work without the right optimization techniques, which we’ve reviewed in this post. Follow these tips, and you’ll be well on your way toward reconnecting with shoppers who are already close to becoming your customers.

Want more tips to improve your Google AdWords performance?  Click here to get a copy of our Ultimate Google AdWords Checklist.

Marketing in the In-Between of an AI Revolution

“To be good at the digital and physical is what the future’s about. … Get used to living in the in-between.” That was something Beth Comstock, vice chair of GE, said during her keynote at &THEN16. And it really got me thinking: Marketers are living in a whole lot of in-betweens. It’s not just the in-between of physical and digital. We’re also on the cusp of an AI revolution.

“To be good at the digital and physical is what the future’s about. … Get used to living in the in-between.”

That was something Beth Comstock, vice chair of GE, said during her keynote at &THEN16. And it really got me thinking: Marketers are living in a whole lot of in-betweens.

It’s not just the in-between of physical and digital. We’re also on the cusp of an AI revolution. A few weeks ago I was at Dreamforce where I saw this slide from Wired’s Kevin Kelly:

At that same show, Salesforce announced its Einstein cloud-based AI, which can do some pretty cool things. For example, Einstein can analyze a sales person’s email string and determine if it’s likely to convert. It may notice there’s no one with purchasing power at the appropriate level on it, and recommend the email for you to send and who to send it to to fix that.

Yes, Einstein will write the email for you too.

Meanwhile, at &THEN, Adobe just announced that they’re bringing aspects of their own AI-facilitated product, Adobe Analytics, more directly into its marketing tools. That includes adding the analysis workspace directly into Adobe Campaign, which will allow users to analyze customer segments and campaigns with real-time visualizations and AI insights.

Adobe is also adding predictive remarketing to its suite. Predictive remarketing will look at your website visitors, for instance, individually and identify ones who are less likely to return. It then automatically creates and deploys a remarketing trigger to try to re-engage that customer through email, SMS or other channels.

We’re essentially automating the automation. And as we begin to add a flood of passive data from the Internet of Things to that analysis, the automation is going to get very, very smart.

It’s all part of a revolution in what humans can accomplish with data and machines.

Kelly made an analogy: You could think of the Industrial Revolution as the introduction and mastery of artificial power — steam and electricity replacing human, animal or other forms of natural muscle. That power became controllable; it enabled many, many times the output of the old natural power; and it became cheap enough that we soon put electricity in every household.

He said that’s exactly what we’re about to see in the revolution of artificial intelligence. Hence the next 10,000 startups.

The AI Revolution Will Not be TelevisedWe’re collectively and spontaneously reorganizing our culture around digital information structures, according to Comstock. I think the acceleration of machine learning tools is a testament to that.

The fact it’s happening here in marketing pretty early in the lifecycle of true AI is testament to another thing she said: “Marketers are behaviorists, we recognize and anticipate change.”

And the role of shaping, communicating, and promoting (or discouraging) that change also lies in the hands of marketers. “Communications is where change happens,” Comstock said. “Communications is how you structure a culture.”

Turns out it’s also how you structure a machine culture. And perhaps how a machine culture will continue to restructure us.

So we are all very much navigating the in-between: Of physical and digital customer interactions, of human and machine intelligence, of a revolution that will not be televised because it’s already streaming live on a dozen social networks to audiences carefully chosen by algorithms to be most likely to engage.

Get used to it.

Migrate Facebook Followers Now to Opt-in Email Lists

If you use Facebook in your marketing mix, there are new concerns about user engagement, suggesting you need to be more proactive than before about migrating your “followers” to your opt-in email list. During the past couple of years, my observation, now backed up with research, reveals that fewer people …

facebook email logoIf you use Facebook in your marketing mix, there are new concerns about user engagement, suggesting you need to be more proactive than before about migrating your Facebook “followers” to your opt-in email list. During the past couple of years, my observation, now backed up with research, reveals that fewer people are posting updates about their lives and instead have moved on to sharing news (often “faux news” with spammy clickbait headlines), videos and stuff having little to do with themselves.

The drop is significant: 21 percent fewer posts with users’ own words and images from 2014 to 2015, and a 5.5 percent drop in sharing, according to a report in Inc. and The Information.

Why Facebook Followers Are Risky

Why is this bad news? Because sharing life events is the magnetic allure of Facebook that keeps users coming back. But if users aren’t sharing updates about themselves as much, and instead are posting faux news and cute animal videos, it stands to reason that Facebook users will engage less frequently or move on to other platforms where sharing is still predominant.

As to why people aren’t sharing as much, I posed that question on my own Facebook page, and a friend wrote this:

“I love connecting with friends and family who live far from me. But, as you have observed, fewer of these folks are posting personal photos/content. I have heard comments about:

• Fear of predators who see photos of children and then stalk them;

• Fear of current or future employers using your posts of party activities (toasting with an adult beverage) or concerts against you;

• General lack of privacy even when you think you’ve tightened your settings;

• Dislike for the targeted advertising — I post something about back pain and then I get ads and junk emails for related products;

• The systematic way Facebook decided what/who you prefer to see, even when you have marked the pages and people you want to follow first.”

5 Ways to Encourage Facebook-to-Email Opt-Ins

As a marketer, if you have followers on Facebook or any other social media, remember that you are merely “renting” the privilege of communicating with them. You don’t “own” the name as you would with your postal or email list. Here are some actions you can take to migrate Facebook followers to opt-in to email:

  1. Aggressively encourage your followers to opt-in to your email list. In the apps section on your Facebook business or organization page, you can embed a link within Facebook to opt-in to your email list, integrating with an email marketing system, such as Mailchimp or others.
  2. Encourage followers to click on posts that lead to your website, and when they do, encourage them to opt-in to your email list. While most of us as consumers may not like pop-ups on websites, they work for building an opt-in list.
  3. You need strong headlines to earn clicks. With so many spammy clickbait headlines and faux news stories, be mindful about how you entice followers to click on your posts. Build trust with credible content.
  4. Your posts are going to sink down the news feed quickly. You have a couple of options: Post multiple times daily (some have found that four times per day is optimal, but change out the content each time), or pay to play with sponsored posts where you set the audience, amount you’ll spend and length of time the post will be boosted.
  5. Consider creating a custom audience using Facebook remarketing ads. After adding a pixel to your website, you can serve ads to people who visited within the past 180 days. This is one more tool to bring people back to your website to opt-in (or better, make a purchase).

The gold standard for generating conversions and higher ROI is email and postal mail. If you think you can completely replace these channels by posting to your followers on Facebook, your marketing performance will surely disappoint as Facebook risks becoming less about people sharing their lives.

My advice for a back-up plan: Don’t abandon Facebook. I’m certainly not jumping off the Facebook wagon for any of my clients, but work harder to grow your “earned” email list now, so you own the name.

(Want more tips and advice about how to align your messaging with how the primitive mind thinks so you can attract more customers? I’ve put together a seven-step guide to help you titled “When You Need More Customers, This Is What You Do.” Or get all the details in my new book, “Crack the Customer Mind Code” available at the DirectMarketingIQ bookstore.)

Your Top 5 Direct Marketing Problems

What do you consider your greatest marketing problem? Or perhaps of even more interest: What do your peers report as their top marketing problems? And if you could, wouldn’t you want to know what channels your competitors report as working for them?

Angry manWhat do you consider your greatest marketing problem? Or perhaps of even more interest: What do your peers report as their top marketing problems? And if you could, wouldn’t you want to know what channels your competitors report as working for them? I recently surveyed a few marketers with those questions, so today I share what’s on their minds, along with an analysis of those marketing problems and successful channels as we go into 2016.

First, the top five problems:

  1. “Finding new customers and reengaging the ones we have to buy again.”
  2. “Competitive pressure is relentless and we’re struggling to break out.”
  3. “Overwhelmed with channel choices and uncertain what channels to use.”
  4. “Marketing in general isn’t delivering like it used to.”
  5. “Profitability is too low.”

Next, the channels with the highest satisfaction:

  1. Email
  2. Websites/landing pages
  3. Facebook
  4. Video
  5. Direct mail

Combining these two topics, I offer this analysis in the form of three takeaways:

Takeaway No. 1
Problem No. 1, finding new customers, and No. 3, channel choices, are linked. If these two elements are your problems too, you may be limiting your profitability with the channels you’re using. The number of channel choices and the pace at which they evolve is dizzying. You need to be knowledgeable about them (or find someone who can untangle them for you). You may need to venture out into the unknown. As they saying goes, you need to “meet your customers where they are.” If they’re on a channel you’re not using, then you likely suffer from difficulties in finding new customers and reengaging past customers.

Now, let’s overlay these problems with the channels where your peers report satisfaction.

  • The marketers who I heard from are satisfied with email marketing. If you’re not happy with your email marketing results, maybe it’s time to more aggressively A/B test new approaches to identify winners. Don’t forget the importance of your landing page to close deals.
  • Consider A/B testing of video on your landing page and evaluate its impact on conversions. Or test a long-form video sales letter. A well-done video can create greater comprehension.
  • Have you tried Facebook remarketing? Promoted posts? Are you engaging your followers frequently, with meaningful content, to create raving fans? Once you build Facebook followers, you have to continue to deliver meaningful content before you see results.

Takeaway No. 2
Problem No. 2, competitive pressure, and No. 4, marketing not delivering like it used to, can also be linked. How do you break away from your competition? You may need to re-examine your unique selling proposition, and then reposition your product or organization.

Have you conducted a competitive analysis? Research what your competitors are doing online and the channels they are using. Document your findings, then make a list of the top five things they’re doing that you’re not and test new approaches.

Takeaway No. 3
Problem No. 5, low profitability, reveals that you need to find lower-cost channels, or make a higher-cost channel like direct mail work better. Another possibility: reevaluate your offer and price. The top three channels where marketers are satisfied (email, websites and Facebook) are typically less expensive than direct mail, but require ongoing content development. Video doesn’t have to be expensive, especially if you’re able to use customer-generated video for testimonials.

If profitability is lower than you want, now is the time for two tests: One is to invest in lower cost channels. The second is to test new creative and/or production values in direct mail to either increase response, or lower your cost per response.

Video Advertising and Remarketing for Direct Marketers

If you’re a direct marketer who uses video to promote your product or service, you can generate additional exposure to prospective customers using YouTube’s TrueView advertising program. With TrueView, you also have an interesting bonus when you use their video remarketing tools. Remarketing tracking, also known as remessaging or retargeting, enables you to build a prospect list and bring viewers back to your

If you’re a direct marketer who uses video to promote your product or service, you can generate additional exposure to prospective customers using YouTube’s TrueView advertising program. With TrueView, you also have an interesting bonus when you use their video remarketing tools. Remarketing tracking, also known as remessaging or retargeting, enables you to build a prospect list and bring viewers back to your video marketing message.

With remarketing, you have the opportunity to show text or display ads to promote your video, based on their past interactions with your videos.

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it)

YouTube’s advertising program features three video ad formats:

1. In-Stream Video ads.

2. In-Search Video ads.

3. In-display video ads.

We explain each of these in today’s video.

When you run a video ad campaign on YouTube, you also have the opportunity to create a video remarketing campaign. They were a warm prospect once, so now you may be able to re-engage them with your ad. Remarketing is a powerful way to stay engaged with your target audience.

Learn more about this opportunity for direct marketers to promote videos to more prospective customers in today’s video presentation.