I’m a Black Widow … What Spider Are You?

Over the last couple of months, I’ve noticed a growing Facebook trend—an increase in those annoyingly stupid quizzes. What flower are you? What actress would play you in the movie version of your life? What Rolling Stones song describes you? What else is surprising is that there is a marketing method behind this madness

Over the last couple of months, I’ve noticed a growing Facebook trend—an increase in those annoyingly stupid quizzes.

What flower are you? What actress would play you in the movie version of your life? What Rolling Stones song describes you? Are we so bored with our lives that we have to take a quiz to help us with self-actualization?

It always surprises me how many of my seemingly intelligent friends participate in these time-wasters. And I’m not sure I care that if my neighbor were a flower, she’d be a Lily … or if my sister were a dog, she’d be a lab.

What else is surprising is that there is a marketing method behind this madness.

As Americans, we love games, trivia, puzzles, quizzes—anything where we can demonstrate our superiority or prowess. I’ll admit that The New York Times Crossword puzzle is sometimes the sole reason I purchase a newsstand copy of the Times (and if you’re a regular reader of my blog, you already know that I’m obsessed with Words With Friends).

It should come as no surprise that smart brands have figured out how to turn this obsession into a marketing opportunity. Long before Facebook came into our lives, magazines used quizzes to entice readers to purchase—right from the front cover that screamed to us in the grocery check-out lane: “Are you a good kisser? Take this quiz and find out!” Cosmo turned the quizzes into an art form starting in the early 1960’s.

Online quizzes are simply a means to a financial end for popular quiz-maker Buzzfeed. They’ve figured out how to use the data to help brands market things to you.

When you take a quiz about “American Idol,” for example, you’re not just telling the network that you’re a viewer. By connecting the dots to your profile data, now the network knows your age range, gender, marital status and other habits like favorite alcohol, or food—and that can be a goldmine.

But Facebook isn’t the only one to cash in on quizzes to drive advertising sales, LinkedIn is also guilty. Recently we created a digital banner campaign for a B-to-C client that ran on LinkedIn for a few weeks. We tested different messages and offers, and our clicks (and subsequent registration) data was good, but not great. Then we leveraged their quiz option.

On LinkedIn, you create a single question with multiple response options, and the collective response results are posted in real time. After the targets answers the quiz, they are then exposed to the results—and to your banner ads—and the results were impressive. Much higher number of clicks, and a much higher percent of clicks, and a much higher number of registrants—all at a much lower CPC. Now that’s an ROI that makes much more sense to this marketer.

If a reader has figured out how to really leverage the Facebook quizzes for marketing gain, I’d love to hear about it.

And, for the record, if I were a city, I’d be …

7 Customer Survey Tips, or How to Know Your Customer For Increased Leads & Profits

Ask any business owner and they’ll tell you, one of the most important rules of thumb is “know thy customer” (KTC). For many years, I’ve found the best way to KTC is implementing periodic customer surveys, then creating a “customer profile” sheet. 

Ask any business owner and they’ll tell you, one of the most important rules of thumb is “know thy customer” (KTC).

Knowing who your customers are—not just on a superficial level, but also on a deeper level—is fundamental for business longevity. It can help your business with most any targeted marketing efforts such as social media marketing (communities with like-minded interests), direct mail and email list selection, copywriting, media buying, affiliate marketing and more. It can also help with bottom-line goals such as bonding, lead generation and sales.

For many years, I’ve found the best way to KTC is implementing periodic customer surveys, then creating a “customer profile” sheet. Ideally, you want to survey at least two times per year, especially after large attrition or list growth.

The profile sheet is important, as it’s a quick reference of your “Joe and Jane” customers, as well as your ideal ‘target’ lead. After all, your prospecting efforts should be a reflection of your current customer base.

But surprisingly enough, not every business knows how to effectively implement and data-mine its online surveys and the respective results.

Here are some quick tips to get the best performance from your customer surveys for business growth and retention:

1. Keep surveys easy and short. The ideal length should be no longer than 10 to 20 questions and questions should be easy to answer. That means thinking of typical questions and having pre-populated multiple choice answers that only need a mouse click.

2. Go 360. Questions should cover demographics, geographics and psychographics. Also, for potential joint venture or advertising opportunities, it’s smart to also ask some competitor and purchase-behavioral type questions.

3. Segmentation is key. Send at least two separate emails to your list. One survey to paying customers and one survey to non-paying customers (leads). It will help later to have these two segments separated when you review response results. If one segment is less responsive than another, you can isolate future “bonding” strategies.

4. Offer incentives. I like to offer free, immediate and easily accessible gifts for survey participation after completion of a survey. Once users submit their last response they are redirected to a download page to free reports or similar. People are taking time out of their schedule and should be “rewarded” accordingly.

5. Be creative with the email subject line. I’ve found that response is greater if the focus of the subject line is more on the reward, rather than the goal. Readers respond better to the mention of freebies and gifts (the “what’s in it for me”), than asking for survey completion. Survey subject lines are viewed as clinical and boring, thus glared over in the inbox.

6. Embrace online tools. Use an easy, cost-effective online survey, such as SurveyMonkey.com. There’s different options and price points, varying on need and robustness. But ideally, you’d want to be able to collect emails and tie responses down to the user (email) level.

7. Allow feedback. Always have an “other” field for open comments. People like to either vent or add praise, so don’t limit them with only having all multiple choice. I tend to make this option the last question.

If you’ve set up your survey correctly where you can drill down responses to the user (email) level, you can then created “buckets” (categories) of common themes. For example, buckets could be based on RFM (recency, frequency or monetary) or on other categories such as interests.

You can then use this information for database marketing efforts and send more personalized messages to your list by group (or “bucket”). This targeted marketing approach has been proven to increase open, click, response and conversion rates by more than double!

Not surveying your list is really doing a disservice. You are not really getting to know your customers; thereby, aren’t offering your best editorial or promotional messages, or creating the best products.

If you’re truly looking for better retention, more customer engagement, and increased sales or leads, then make the time to survey your list.

If you’ve never done this before, then you’re truly leaving money on the table, my friend.