7 Feelings That Add Warmth to Copywriting

Sometimes we get too close to the bells and whistles of our products and services. When that happens, it can be helpful to step back and remember what is near and dear to the heart of your prospective customer. Push away bright, shiny features and techno-speak, and ask yourself if any of these seven feelings can open a new pathway for you to be invited inside your prospect’s mind

Sometimes we get too close to the bells and whistles of our products and services. When that happens, it can be helpful to step back and remember what is near and dear to the heart of your prospective customer. Push away bright, shiny features and techno-speak, and ask yourself if any of these seven feelings can open a new pathway for you to be invited inside your prospect’s mind.

As marketers, we know there are many ways to persuade someone to read or listen to your sales message, such as money, success, respect, and influence.

But perhaps you need an emotional hook. With simplicity and emotion in mind, here are seven feelings where you can bring warmth and emotion to your copy and message.

  1. Family: What more important value than the love a person has for family? Family-centered safety and warmth is a winner about every time it’s used. When most people think about what’s most important in their lives, it’s family.
  2. Friends: Including friends into a sales message can free up the mind from the drudgery of day-to-day work. And most people associate friends with entertainment, time together, and sharing of personal relationships.
  3. Fun: With our senses so often bombarded with negative news, a fun or playful spirit in your sales message can lighten the mental load. Most people would rather play than work. Fun invites involvement. Involvement invites response.
  4. Food: This tasty four-letter F-word gets your attention, doesn’t it? Now that you’ve read it, you might be salivating. Just the word “food” can trigger basic human desire to eat (that snack or dessert sure you’re imagining tastes yummy, doesn’t it?).
  5. Fashion: Deep down, we want to look good. And clothes and fashion help create a personal branding statement. Most people want to be attractive, and most people are attracted to others who look good.
  6. Fitness: People have good intentions about being fit and healthy, even if they don’t want to hit the gym and know they could do better. So, get attention by conveying how you can contribute to someone’s improved health.
  7. Fido/Felines: When was the last time you watched a video on social media featuring a cat or dog? You can admit it. We all do. So you can hardly go wrong when you introduce a lovable or quirky pet into your marketing message.

Simple emotions? Yes. But sometimes we all a little nudge to remind us it’s the small things that stir our feelings.

5 Positioning Ideas When Leading With Price

What works best? Selling product benefits, then revealing the price? Or revealing the price, followed by selling benefits? There are rarely absolute answers, and statistically valid A/B testing in a direct marketing environment will give you the answer that works for your situation. Still, findings of a new study suggest five ways for direct marketers to reveal price

What works best? Selling product benefits, then revealing the price? Or revealing the price, followed by selling benefits? There are rarely absolute answers, and statistically valid A/B testing in a direct marketing environment will give you the answer that works for your situation. Still, findings of a new study suggest five ways for direct marketers to reveal price.

Neuroscientists and professors from Harvard Business School and Stanford University conducted a study to see if considering price first changed the way the brain coded the value of the product.

The focus on the research was on brain activity when the participant saw the price and product presented together. They were most interested in the area in the brain that deals with estimating decision value (the medial prefrontal cortex), and the area of the brain that’s been called the pleasure center and whose activity is correlated with whether a product is viscerally desirable. This pleasure center is called the nucleus accumbens.

Fundamentally, the research indicates there are differences in how a person codes information, based on whether the product has a greater emotional attachment, or whether the product was more practical.

They found that brain activity did vary in the sequence of product versus price first. A conclusion of the report is that when the product came first, the decision question seemed to be one of “Do I like it?” and when the price came first, the question seemed to be “Is it worth it?” Three other points made in the research suggest that showing price first can make a difference:

  • The order of price or product presentation doesn’t matter when the product is desirable and easily understood and consumed (e.g., movies, clothes, electronics), and fulfill an emotional need. If the product is affordable in this instance, then it’s an easy decision no matter how price was presented.
  • When a product is on sale or bargain-priced, showing price first can positively influence the sale.
  • When the product is practical or useful (more than emotional) showing price first prompted participants to be significantly more likely to purchase a product.

“The question isn’t whether the price makes a product seem better, it’s whether a product is worth its price.” said Uma R. Karmarkar, one of the research author. “Putting the price first just tightens the link between the benefit you get from the price and the benefit you get from the product itself.”

For direct marketing, copywriting formulas often dictate that the price comes toward the end of a sales message, after the product has been presented—particularly in letters and longer-form copy. This study suggests an A/B test of revealing price first is in order.

If you are going to test revealing price first, here are five positioning ideas:

  1. When a product is on sale, prominently show the price. Use dollars, not percentages. Percentages aren’t easily calculated in the mind (or worse, they are miscalculated in the mind and you risk losing a sale).
  2. Incrementally break down the price. Show it as the cost per day, cost per use, or some other practical way to reveal increments of the price.
  3. Compare the price to an everyday item. One of my most successful direct mail packages included a letter with a headline that said, “For about the cost of a cup of coffee a day, you can have …”
  4. Compare to your competition. If you have a price advantage, show it. If you don’t, then compare at a different level that includes longer product life, more convenience, or other benefits.
  5. Position the price presentation as a cost of not buying now. In other words, show how the price could increase in the future, or the loss that can happen by waiting. This positioning also creates urgency.

It’s important to acknowledge is that the research didn’t study emotion-based long-copy with storytelling and unique selling positioning of the product. Using emotion, story and a strong USP before revealing price in a direct marketing environment may be more effective to sell your product. Every situation is different. The only way to conclusively know if revealing price first will generate a higher response than presenting the sales message first is to A/B test.

Why You Should Beware the ‘Quick SEO Copywriting Fix’

The question comes up during almost every conference at which I present: “I hear what you’re saying about writing quality content. But I need immediate results. What’s a quick SEO copywriting fix I can try?”

The question comes up during almost every conference at which I present.

“I hear what you’re saying about writing quality content. But I need immediate results. What’s a quick SEO copywriting fix I can try?”

I understand this mindset. I really do. Now that the recession is easing its iron grip on marketing budgets, companies are trying to make up for lost time. Now, more than ever, forward-thinking businesses have the opportunity to make a huge impact on their search engine rankings. And they’re doing what they can, where they can—as fast as they can.

But here’s the thing. There is no “quick SEO copywriting fix.” There’s no “easy way to get to the top of the search engines” like the spam e-mails promise. You can’t wave a magic algorithmic wand and transform your copy into search engine goodness.

You just have to roll your sleeves, do the hard work and get it done.

Unfortunately, many companies fall prey to this quick fix mentality and do stupid things that mess up their SEO campaigns, branding or both. For instance:

  • Building out stand-alone “SEO pages” geared to pull rankings

  • Hiring $10/post bloggers to write keyphrase-stuffed posts

  • Tweeting incessantly about their products or services without becoming a part of the Twitter community

Although these folks feel like progress is quickly being made (“Woo-hoo, now we have 50, poorly-written posts about legal services”), what they don’t realize is the unforeseen consequences. Poorly written content doesn’t convert. “Stand-alone” pages typically are over-optimized messes that search engines ignore. Splattering your sales message all over Twitter makes your firm look like a spammer.

So, what can you do to start seeing the search results (and conversions) you crave? I am so glad you asked …

1. Evaluate your existing content. Every marketer can leverage its own low-hanging fruit and focus on what specifically matters for its site. For some sites, penning new page titles can drive amazing results. For others, keyphrase editing (adding keyphrases to existing content) may be appropriate. Consider bringing in a consultant for this part of the process. The reason? The consultant doesn’t “own” the copy and can see it with fresh eyes. Because he’s not close to it, he can notice opportunities your marketing department may not.

2. Check your keyphrase research. It’s easy to let your keyphrase research stagnate when you don’t have the time (or funds) to spend on your site. Now that you’re planning a content overhaul, it’s crucial to examine what other keyphrases opportunities you can leverage – especially keyphrases that represent the research phase of the buy cycle. Research tools like WordStream, Keyword Discovery and Wordtracker can help you see what phrases people type into the search box to find products and services like yours.

3. Develop a (workable) content schedule and budget. Rome wasn’t built in a day, and your site won’t be rewritten overnight. Work on your most important pages first, and set up a schedule where you’ll work on a certain number of pages a month. Or, if you know that writing content in-house isn’t your style, hire an experienced SEO copywriter and have him help. Creating content in baby steps is completely OK – and gives you the satisfaction of seeing continued improvement.

It’s tempting to fall prey to the SEO copywriting quick fix. But when you take strategic baby steps and focus on what’s really important to your site’s success, you’ll finally realize the search ranking (and conversions) you crave.