Use Google Trends to Improve Google Ads Performance

Google Trends can help brands find additional keywords to target popular promotional ideas. Plus, marketers can use seasonal trends to maximize their ad budgets throughout the year.

Have you ever wanted to know in which months your prospects are more likely to be searching for something you sell? Or did you ever wish you could capitalize on recent trends to promote your brand?

Then you need to get familiar with the Google Trends tool.

Imagine you’re a sports medicine practice. You want to set up a campaign that coincides with sports injuries throughout the year. Sure, you could look at your own patient data, but that may not align accurately with when prospective patients are searching online.

How to Find When and Where People Are Searching

By using Google Trends, you can take a peek at the search terms being used throughout the year for your specialty. This way, you can create ads and target specific keywords when there’s a high likelihood people will be searching for them.

By entering “sports injuries” into Google Trends, we receive these results:

As we can see, people search for sports injuries much more from about February to April. Then there’s a huge dip until people start searching more in September until the holidays. To capitalize on this trend, you’ll want to allocate more of your ad budget from February to April and from September to November vs. May to August and December to January, when there will be fewer searches.

Google Trends will also show you a longer timeframe, like the last five years, so you can see if the trend consistently repeats every year and if more or fewer people are searching each year.

The graph above shows us that the same dip in search popularity for “sports injuries” occurs consistently every year in the summer.

Capitalizing on Trending Topics

Discovering what is popular now will help you see if you have a chance to capitalize on it before it fizzles out.

For instance, at the time of writing this article, the fifth-most trending search was related to sports and one of the popular articles was “What really works when it comes to sports recovery?”

That tells us there’s currently a lot of interest in the topic of sports recovery, which could be a good angle for an ad campaign.

Anticipate Trends

By studying Google Trends, you can spot early trends. While this takes much more effort, experience and knowledge to get it right, it can be quite effective, if done correctly.

Because you’ll be way ahead of those who haven’t anticipated the trend, you’ll have a nice competitive advantage.

Using Related Search Queries

You can use the related search queries in Google Trends to get additional ideas for ad campaigns. For instance, if you search for trending information on “hats,” you’ll see the following related trending searches.

If your business sells hats, then you’ll immediately see an opportunity to promote Kentucky derby hats, because that is the No. 1 related keyword that is trending right now.

Getting to Know Google Trends

Google Trends holds a lot of important information you can use for your Google Ads campaigns. Take some time to research the trends, learn how trends happen (usually when breaking news hits), and how you can jump on short-living trends, as well as the seasonal ones. And don’t forget about looking into those related queries to find additional ideas for ad campaigns.

Want more Google Ads tips to improve your performance? Click here to grab a copy of our “Ultimate Google Ads Checklist.”

Are You Marketing or Succumbing to Google?

If your organization hosts a website, you probably already know the importance of seeding key search terms on your site. Search engine optimization, or SEO, is the method used to improve a website’s position on the results page of a search engine. The more relevant your site to the search term, the better positioning you’ll get in organic search results. The challenge is to stay true to your brand while leveraging those keyword terms.

search-engine-76519_640 googleIf your organization hosts a website, you probably already know the importance of seeding key search terms on your site. Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, is the method used to improve a website’s position on the results page of a search engine. The more relevant your site to the search term, the better positioning you’ll get in organic search results. The challenge is to stay true to your brand while leveraging those keyword terms.

Recently, a client rejected some copy I’d written for a new piece of fulfillment content because it did not reflect their brand voice. When I pointed out that it closely mimicked something I had found deep in their website, the reply was something like “Oh that was just for SEO. We would never actually talk about our brand that way.”

With the bulk of leads being driven by digital channels, keywords have become the backbone of every digital marketing initiative.

  • H1 tags (the header words you use to title your content) and meta descriptions (the copy that appears underneath the search result headline) should absolutely reflect key words. But if you’ve ever conducted search and read the meta descriptions they often appear to simply have the search word “inserted” into the middle of the sentence, and as a result, the sentence makes very little sense.
  • Permalinks (the name of each URL page in your website) need to leverage keywords. For example, if your business is Joe’s Plumbing and consumers regularly search for the term “rusty pipes,” it would be optimal for you to have a page with a permalink such as http://www.joesplumbing.com/rusty-pipes.
  • Keyword density is the number of times a keyword appears on your website, but many websites go overboard trying to “please” Google search engines. FYI, Google will also consider the use of synonymous keywords, so you don’t need to bog every page down with the word “rusty pipes” in order to boost your rankings.

Clearly it’s not possible to have every keyword embedded multiple times on your website. And, it’s a lot of work to have duplicate Web pages tweaked to ensure the permalink replicates the keyword term and they are keyword-dense.

In our fight to get our brand to the top of the organic results, are we compromising our brand values and brand voice? Are we simply crafting content so we can ensure Google knows we’re constantly updating our pages to optimize search engine results? Are we busy building relationships with bloggers and news outlets in order to ensure we optimize the number of backlinks?

Somehow it all feels like we’ve lost control of our brand and our marketing integrity as we bow to the Google algorithm gods.

6 Key AdWords Reports to Use for Your Small Business

Advertising your small business in Google AdWords is easy to get started. But spending your budget efficiently to connect with the most likely potential customers? That’s an entirely different matter, and it means understanding the available AdWords reports.

Advertising your small business in Google AdWords is easy to get started. But spending your budget efficiently to connect with the most likely potential customers? That’s an entirely different matter, and it means understanding the available AdWords reports.

What are reports, and why are they so helpful? As you advertise with AdWords, data generated by your campaigns, ad groups and ads is collected and saved — and we’re talking huge amounts of data, ranging from which keyword phrases trigger your ads to which devices your visitors are using. This continually growing mountain of data is way too immense to be useful as a whole. You need a way to use this data and identify important trends or cautionary red flags.

That’s where AdWords reports come in. Determining which reports are most worthwhile can seem overwhelming. Read on for six key AdWords reports that you should start using for your small business.

Report 1: Campaign Performance Report

Before you start digging into specific sets of data, it’s good to step back and take a broad-level view of your campaigns. Do this by running a Campaign Performance report, which includes all the default stats you’ll normally find at the campaign level in AdWords. These stats include clicks, click-through rate (CTR), average ad positions, conversions, conversion rates, cost per conversion and conversion value. Pay especially close attention to campaigns with low costs per conversion — find out what makes them successful and apply that knowledge to new and existing campaigns.

Also, you can customize the date ranges of Campaign Performance reports going back weeks, months or years. You’ll cover the most ground with Campaign Performance reports that cover more recent timeframes, but occasional reports across larger timeframes could open your eyes to important trends you otherwise might have missed.

Report 2: Search Terms Report

Want to know how people are finding your ads? You should, and that’s why the Search terms report is helpful. This report reveals the actual search queries people type (or speak) into Google that cause your ads to appear.

Adding relevant, high-performing search terms to your keyword lists usually results in more traffic at lower CPCs. Conversely, adding irrelevant search terms to your negative keyword lists will boost CTRs, reduce CPCs and likely lower your costs per conversion.

Report 3: Placement Report

The Placement Report reveals how your ads perform across Google’s massive Display Network, which is generally a good source of less-expensive, high-volume traffic. However, people who click ads on the Display Network often aren’t as buyer-oriented as those who shop on the Search Network. As a result, Display Network traffic often doesn’t convert as well as Search Network traffic. Also, performance can vary greatly between Display Network websites. The Placement Report provides data from specific Display Network websites so you don’t have to guess which ones are worthwhile. Use managed placements to target your ads toward top-performing Display Network websites, then reduce your bids for low-performing websites or block them from showing your ads.

When reviewing this report, just remember that Display Network trends usually don’t mirror Search Network trends. With that in mind, you’re better off focusing on conversion data rather than superficial metrics such as costs per click and CTR.

Report 4: Audience Demographics Report

Who is clicking your online ads, and which of those visitors are most likely to become paying customers? To start answering this question, check your audience demographics report data. Do this under the Display Network tab for Display ads or the Audiences tab for Search Network ads. This report breaks down your Search Network traffic by gender and age range. You can also see the parental status of Display traffic and household income for Video traffic.

If certain demographics outperform others, then you can target your campaigns specifically toward those audiences. You can also lower your bids for under-performing audiences.