Sensory Appeal, in Video Form

In a world where it’s easy to experience sensory overload multiple times a day just from our smartphones, it’s almost ironic to suggest that you add to it with your marketing programs. But you should.

VideoIn a world where it’s easy to experience sensory overload multiple times a day just from our smartphones, it’s almost ironic to suggest that you add to it with your marketing programs. But you should.

With all of the media consumers consume daily — about 11 hours a day, for all channels combined — we’ve become dependent on interactive digital experiences that take little more effort than listening and watching. And we don’t even like doing that for more than two minutes. Our media usage has changed our interest levels, or maybe its our willingness to read or watch long documentaries — as we are now used to getting news, and now possibly the State of the Union, in Twitter posts.

Rising to fill the gap from our changing media consumption is video — short, entertaining snippets of two to three minutes that entertain, inform and, hopefully for those who produce them, inspire us to engage, inquire and buy something. It’s working.

HubSpot shares some powerful statistics showing how video is impacting consumer behavior and why you need to jump on this bandwagon, too. Here are just a few:

  • Videos in email lead to a jump in clickthrough rates of between 200 and 300 percent
  • Videos on a landing page can help your conversions increase by 80 percent
  • Videos combined with a full-page ad can boost engagement by 22 percent
  • Videos can increase likelihood of purchase by 64 percent among online shoppers
  • Videos included in a real estate listing can up inquiries by 403 percent
  • Video inspires 50 percent of executives to seek more information about a product
  • Video inspires 65 percent of executives to visit a marketer’s website, and 39 percent to call a vendor

I could go on … but I think the point is clear: You need to create videos if you want to engage customers and sell more products. And because YouTube is the second-largest search engine, next to Google. Enough said.

I’ll Say More

Another reason you must include video in addition to all of the above is most of your competitors are doing it and that can leave you out in the cold if you are not. Okay, so more stats from HubSpot:

  • 87 percent of online marketers use video content
  • 22 percent of small businesses in the U.S. plan to use it
  • 96 percent of B-to-B organizations use it

Most importantly, 90 percent of video watchers say they help them make purchase decisions and 92 percent of those viewing them on mobile devices share videos with others.

The one challenge is that there are a lot of videos competing with each other, as evidenced by yet another statistic: On average, users are exposed to 32.3 videos a month, or roughly one a day.

So how do you create videos that build your business and use them effectively in your marketing mix?

Like all things you do in any medium — print, digital, mobile — your content needs to have value, and that value can be improving someone’s circumstances, inspiring them to live a better life, or guiding them to do their jobs better, so they achieve their goals and advance their careers. Your videos need to create an emotional reaction that drives them to contact you for further information.

Here Are Some Tips

Regardless of your business genre, keep videos short and to the point. This is not your attempt to produce a Hollywood blockbuster. It is simply a way to tell your story with a medium that appeals to our senses and makes your brand come to life. Your videos should not be more than two to three minutes long. Go more only if your content justifies it.

Before you debut your videos publicly, test them. Ask non-employees and even non-customers to sit through your videos and give you feedback. Good questions to ask include:

  • Did it keep your interest?
  • What was the main message you took away from this video?
  • Did it inspire you to inquire more about our product or service? If yes, why? If not, why?
  • Was the length appropriate?
  • Did you think the production quality of this video was in line with other brand videos you have watched?

Like any marketing communications, always include a call to action and a response mechanism. Stay away from promotions, as they’ll expire before you’re ready to stop using the video. Make it clear how to contact you for more information through your email, website, phone numbers and social channels.

Keep your videos short. No one wants to spend more than two to three minutes watching a video that they know is intended to sell them something. Use their time and yours wisely, and keep your content on-task.

Use professional footage and images. Your video can be a slide show, with text fading in and out, or it can be a true video with all of the moving parts. Regardless of the format you use, use the highest resolution and quality possible. Your reputation is on the line, per the quality you project. If you are a high-tech company and you use low-tech video, that transfers to the perceived quality of the products you sell.

Create a YouTube channel to house all of your videos. You can archive videos on YouTube and on your website. For either option, include a transcript of your video to help you achieve higher SEO.

For B-to-C, you can add a little more fun and focus on life messages, not just brand messages. Coca-Cola does a great job of this. Its channel has more than 1.2 million subscribers and its views have topped more than 22 million for a single video. Coke’s “Happiness Truck” video, which shows a Coke truck dispensing gifts to people on the streets in Rio, has more than 1.6 million views — another inspirational message that worked to build the emotional equity of the Coke brand. Interestingly enough, its video with 22.3 million views as of this writing is about spending more time offline and enjoying the journey of life in the real world.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiu9PcEyQ5Y

B-to-B Video Tip

For the B-to-B world, here are some tips:

  • Create product demo videos to showcase the features that set your products apart.
  • Show how your products compare to competitors, when applicable, and how your products fulfill the needs of your viewers.
  • Include statements from your company leaders to show their vision and help tell your brand story.
  • Include customers talking about their experiences with your product and your team. Video testimonials are powerful, because viewers can see the body language, the smiles, the looks of relief and hear the excitement in voices that written testimonials do not provide.

Again, consumers like to see brand stories in which they can see themselves. They want to be the proud father, or the mom being thanked by her Olympian child as shown in Proctor and Gamble’s “Thank You, Mom” ad series that makes many moms cry, no matter how many times they watch the videos. Consumers want to be the vacationers on the beach, the newly engaged couple, the happy family.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQ3k6BFX2uw

Find ways to associate your brand with what matters most to your consumers and then get creative and start writing video scripts that tell your story in conjunction with the goals they have for their lives.

Direct Mail Benchmarks From DMA

In my years following the direct marketing field, one of the resources I’ve most appreciated is the Direct Marketing Association’s annual roundup of direct and interactive marketing statistics, the DMA Statistical Fact Book. Each year, this compilation of research studies—this year, 40 prominent sources—offers benchmarks and other metrics related to nearly a dozen categories. Examining direct mail-related data, here are a few stats from this year’s edition that jump out at me. Did you know

In my years following the direct marketing field, one of the resources I’ve most appreciated is the Direct Marketing Association’s annual roundup of direct and interactive marketing statistics, the DMA Statistical Fact Book. Each year, this compilation of research studies—this year, 40 prominent sources—offers benchmarks and other metrics related to nearly a dozen categories: Internet, mobile marketing, social media, catalog, consumer demographics, direct mail, direct marketing overview, email, nonprofit and USPS information.

Examining direct mail-related data, here are a few stats from this year’s edition that jump out at me. Did you know:

  1. The mean cost per order or lead for a letter-sized direct mail piece sent to a house file is $19.35, and the same sent to a prospect or total file is $51.30. —”DMA Response Rate Report,” 2012.
  2. More than 12.5 million consumers purchased prescription drugs via a mail or phone order. —Experian Simmons “National Consumer Study,” 2012.
  3. In the food category, 16.8 percent of coupons redeemed originated from the Internet, home-printed; another 6.6 percent originated from direct mail. —Valassis/NCH Marketing Services, “Coupon Facts Reports,” 2013.
  4. The salary range of marketing analytics directors with 7+ years’ experience was $119,300 to $131,500. —Crandall Associates, 2012.
  5. 54.5 percent of U.S. Households read, looked at, or set aside for later reading, their letter-sized enveloped direct mail pieces in 2011. For larger than letter-size envelope mail, 67.2 percent did the same. —USPS “Household Diary Study,” 2012.
  6. Mail order companies have the highest percentage of pieces addressed to specific household members—97.1 percent of their direct mail, while Restaurants have the least—16.2 percent. —USPS “Household Diary Study,” 2012.
  7. The response rate for credit card mailings in 2012 was 0.6 percent—down from 2.2 percent in 1993, but up from 0.3 percent in 2005. —Ipsos/Synovate Mail Monitor, 2012.
  8. In 2012, 54.2 percent of total value of U.S. Mail is attributable to direct mail advertising across all classes. —DMA/USPS “Revenue, Pieces and Weight by Class of Mail and Special Services,” 1990-2012.
  9. In the U.S., direct mail marketing spend held steady at $45.2 billion between 2011 and 2012. It stood at $43.8 billion in 2009. —Winterberry Group, 2013.
  10. After peaking at 19.6 billion catalogs mailed (in the U.S.) in 2007, only 11.8 billion catalogs were mailed in 2012. —DMA/USPS “Revenue, Pieces and Weight by Class of Mail and Special Services,” 2012.
  11. Of 11,743 catalogs in the U.S., 94.1 percent of catalogs have an online version—MediaFinder.com, “National Directory of Catalogs,” 2012.

No wonder the 200-page DMA Statistical Fact Book is—year to year—among DMA’s best sellers in its bookstore. It’s available for purchase via DMA’s online bookstore. The cost is $249 for DMA members and $499 for non-members: https://imis.the-dma.org/bookstore/ProductSingle.cfm?p=0D45047B|4DA56D9737FF45DF90CA1DA713E16B80

Happy reading!

A New Way to Net B-to-B Services Sales With Social Trust

Oh no … not another article on how important building trust is with social marketing. Please I can’t take it anymore! I admit we hear too much hype about the importance of trust but behind all the blather there’s a powerful new approach emerging in B-to-B services sales forces. This is the exact system you should be using to exploit social marketing programs that tap LinkedIn, blogging, Twitter, video, etc.

Oh no … not another article on how important building trust is with social marketing. Please, I can’t take it anymore! I admit we hear too much hype about the importance of trust, but behind all the blather there’s a powerful new approach emerging in B-to-B services sales forces.

This is the exact system you should be using to exploit social marketing programs that tap LinkedIn, blogging, Twitter, video, etc.

This foundational method has traditional roots. It’s based on what works—amplifying concepts that have always worked. It’s just re-tweaking them for our hyper-networked, always-on world.

A Buyer’s Decision Model
Selling B-to-B services in the past looked like this. It’s a selling process:

  1. Lead qualification
  2. Presentation
  3. Objection management
  4. Close
  5. Buyer’s remorse (sometimes!)

The new buyer-focused decision model (forced upon us by the Internet) looks like this:

  1. Cognitive thinking
  2. Information gathering
  3. Divergent thinking
  4. Convergent thinking
  5. Evaluation

For years now we’ve been hearing “it’s not about how we are selling, it’s about how customers go about buying.”

Well duh! Realizing this means nothing. Acting is everything. Building practical B-to-B social marketing strategies that create leads and sales is a must. That’s what this post is all about.

From Messenger to Trusted Advisor
A buying decision model is different than a selling process. Herein lies the emergence of an entirely new industry that hot new companies ranging from point-of-sale messaging firms like Corporate Visions to software-based lead generation companies like HubSpot are set to exploit.

So what’s in it for you and your brand?

In his book, “Putting the Win Back in Your Sales,” Samurai Business Group’s, Dan Kreutzer reveals this decision-making model and quickly elaborates on putting it to use.

“This model provides a framework for how buyers make decisions and, ultimately, how sales people can build trust by helping buyers make effective buying decisions,” says Kreutzer, a 25-year veteran of building winning sales organizations on an international scale.

Think about that for a minute. As social marketers, what if our job is actually less about messages and email “blasts” and more about guidance and education? In this context the buyer decision-making model comes into clear focus.

Social marketing suddenly makes more sense.

What If?
What if you could bring marketing and sales together by helping customers:

  • Engage in critical thinking and situational analysis—placing less strategic emphasis on qualifying leads and coming up with killer content marketing messaging?
  • Move toward or away from your services—gaining confidence in decisions they’re making thanks the trusted, needed advice we provide.
  • Determine ‘best fit’ by publishing powerful (“transparent”) and overtly honest truths—helping customers evaluate all options available to them through useful decision-making tools and education.

What if “the doing of” all these things resulted in creative, effective brand messaging, better quality leads and shorter sales cycles? Well they already are for some organizations.

In weeks ahead I’ll be profiling companies and diving deeper into the subject of using this B-to-B buyer-side model to make social media sell for you.

What do you think?

How to Get Engaged Prospects to Buy

“How do we get customers engaged on our blog and other social media to buy or transact with us? How do we make that leap?” It’s a common question and you’re not alone in asking it. Here’s my answer: Getting engaged sales prospects to consider a purchase or actually transact is easy if you return to trusty, time-tested, proven basic direct response practices.

“How do we get customers engaged on our blog and other social media to buy or transact with us? How do we make that leap?”

It’s a common question and you’re not alone in asking it. Here’s my answer: Getting engaged sales prospects to consider a purchase or actually transact is easy if you return to trusty, time-tested, proven basic direct response practices.

  1. Solving customers’ problems
  2. Designing to sell (planning social experiences to provoke customer responses that connect to the sales funnel)
  3. Translating (discovering customer need as it evolves and using this knowledge to improve response and conversion rate)

How to Sell by Solving Problems
Making things like blogs, YouTube videos, Facebook, Twitter and the like actually sell challenges us to trust traditional instincts—to evolve, not reinvent. The social aspects of attracting, nurturing and earning a purchase are already known. Successful social sellers are designing interactions (“conversations”) in ways that solve customers’ problems. This approach makes it easy to help customers guide themselves toward products and services.

Solving customers problems has always worked! It’s a simple, effective way to produce awareness, interest, desire and purchase behavior. Providing answers to customers’ questions remains the best way to effectively coax or nurture customers toward making a purchase. Social media is inherently interactive, making this process even easier to accomplish.

The key is using this familiar process, not figuring out what time of the week earns more Twitter retweets (or other nonsensical yet popular recommendations we often hear).

Get Customers to Ask Questions That Connect to Products
Making social media sell for you is a matter of facilitating, and then connecting, question-and-answer oriented, digital conversations to helpful products and services whenever they’re relevant. It’s an old idea that you can leverage to drive sales with “new,” social media.

Think about it in your own life. Have you ever found yourself suddenly more equipped to make a purchase based on knowledge you suddenly became aware of? Think about it in your business, outside the Internet. Do you publish whitepapers, magazine articles, or other self-diagnosis tools to help customers become more clear on problems, avoid risk, or exploit unseen opportunities? Are you doing it in ways that occasionally connect with your products or services?

Beware: Just like cranking out whitepapers or information-dense brochures, earning sales takes more. Success requires relevancy and earning response from customers. That means making a habit of inducing customer behavior with every tweet, post, or update you make on social platforms. And that takes a plan, a designed system of question-and-answer driven interactions.

Beware of the Digital Charlatans
As I discuss in the June edition of Target Marketing, beware. Paradigm shifts and “total game-changers” are a goldmine for gurus and self-appointed experts pushing flash-in-the-pan software, books (Full disclosure: I wrote a social media book) and consulting services. There’s nothing wrong with making a living, but beware of misguided advice designed to scare otherwise rational business people into making irrational, hasty investments and spending money on ideas that don’t work.

Successful social sellers understand that the difference between fooling around on social media and selling with it relies on a return to the basics.

5 Pillars of the Mobile Marketing Industry

All emerging industries reach a point where their ecosystem’s members find common and fundamental concepts that help them organize their thoughts and actions in order to ensure the long-term growth and success of their businesses. For mobile marketing, those fundamentals have emerged and can be boiled down to five verbs: promote, measure, educate, guide and protect.

All emerging industries reach a point where their ecosystem’s members find common and fundamental concepts that help them organize their thoughts and actions in order to ensure the long-term growth and success of their businesses. For mobile marketing, those fundamentals have emerged and can be boiled down to five verbs: promote, measure, educate, guide and protect.

In September, the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) refined its messaging along these five pillars to improve its ability to efficiently communicate with the market and to forge forward with its mission to help foster a growing and sustainable mobile marketing industry. The following list highlights the measurable objectives of each of these pillars:

  • Promote. Promote mobile marketing best practices, standards, thought-leadership and industry leaders (e.g., brands, agencies, media companies, application providers, etc.) to foster innovation and industry development.
  • Educate. Provide structured, evidence-based curriculum to educate brands, agencies and consumers about the full scale and scope of mobile marketing practices to highlight their advantages and benefits and to ensure that all players can develop a common understanding of each other’s goals and motivations so that they may efficiently and effectively co-create value between them for their mutual benefit.
  • Measure. As we enter into the “digital age,” where all engagements, moods, preferences, interests and intentions can be digitally imprinted, the key to successful mutual value creation between marketers and consumers will be achieved through the teasing out of insights and knowledge from the vast amounts of data that’s being managed by consumers and marketers alike. In today’s digital world, consumers have as much information as marketers; both need to measure their activities (e.g., total spend in industry, effectiveness of one medium versus another to accomplish one’s goals) to ensure they’re optimizing their time, energy and money.
  • Guide. We all need guidance. By continuing to amass thought-leadership, best practices and self-regulatory codes of conduct, mobile marketers can continue to foster and grow the industry.
  • Protect. Protect consumers and your businesses. All mobile marketers need to pay special attention to the needs of each constituent in the marketplace, and ensure an even playing field for all to help maximize public and industry confidence in mobile marketing, lower barriers to entry and minimize noneconomic costs of doing business.

More than words
These five pillars aren’t just shibboleths. They’re designed to provide the mobile marketing industry with actionable concepts that are key for maintaining growth.

Here’s a real-world example: A recent MMA survey of U.S. advertisers and ad agencies shows strong confidence in mobile marketing’s reach and effectiveness — so much so that they plan to increase their spending 124 percent to more than $5.4 billion by the end of 2011. This projected increase reflects advertiser and agency plans to shift their budgets out of media such as print and outdoor and into the mobile channel.

The “measure” pillar plays a key role by providing the confidence that in turn enables this kind of growth. It’s easier for brands and agencies to justify those dramatic increases and strategy shifts when they have access to independent, primary analytics showing consumer interest in and adoption of mobile services.

But measurement is possible only when everyone is using the same baselines and definitions. The MMA recently worked with the Interactive Advertising Bureau to define what constitutes a mobile ad impression.

Another example of measurement is via independent research. An April 2010 survey conducted by the MMA and one of its official research partners, Luth Research, found that nearly one in four U.S. adult consumers uses mobile location services. Nearly half of those who noticed any ads while using location-based services took at least some action, indicating that consumers respond well to ads through location-based services. That’s the kind of actionable intelligence that brands and agencies need to make the most of the mobile opportunity.

The “promote” pillar plays an equally important role in helping drive industry growth. Case studies, for example, explain how and why certain campaigns are highly successful. This information gives brands and agencies the actionable insights necessary to develop and execute their own strategies, and it complements “measure” by providing additional confidence that the mobile channel will put their marketing budget to highly effective use.

Effectiveness depends partly on the actions of the industry as a whole. That’s where the “educate” pillar comes in. The MMA’s certification program is designed to educate marketing professionals about how to use the mobile channel effectively and appropriately.

That process starts with protecting the consumer experience and the efficiency of the market’s systems so that all players can grow their businesses in a sustainable fashion. Industry-standard guidelines such as the MMA’s “U.S. Consumer Best Practices” and “Code of Conduct for Mobile Marketing” are part of the “guide” pillar, which enables the self-regulation that helps grow the mobile opportunity.

The MMA’s role as guide includes providing a framework so that the mobile industry can create these kinds of documents, which ensure that brands, agencies, developers, carriers and other ecosystem members are all on the same page — and moving forward.

Promote, measure, educate, guide and protect. Five verbs that provide focus and momentum to the ongoing development of a burgeoning industry. Everyone can contribute, you just have to find the area that excites you the most, jump in and get engaged.

A New Approach to Integrated Marketing

I had a great chat the other day with Elana Anderson, the former Forrester Research superstar analyst who has gone out on her own with her (relatively new) company, NxtERA Marketing. The company offers advisory and consulting services to marketing organizations and providers of marketing services and technology.

We were discussing a new study that her company worked on with marketing solutions provider Responsys.

I had a great chat the other day with Elana Anderson, the former Forrester Research superstar analyst who has gone out on her own with her (relatively new) company, NxtERA Marketing. The company offers advisory and consulting services to marketing organizations and providers of marketing services and technology.

We were discussing a new study that her company worked on with marketing solutions provider Responsys.

The main gist of the study–called Marketing Beyond the Status Quo–is that as customer response to broadcast messaging steadily declines and as the percentage of prospects and customers giving permission to market to them decreases, marketers must increase the relevance of their multichannel communications or risk falling short of revenue expectations from the C-suite.

“The data shows – and marketers generally agree – that brands have reached a point where they must invest more time and money in improving the relevance of their communications,” said Anderson.

The report also unveiled the MSQ Model to help marketers determine their relevance maturity and develop a realistic action plan to become a more customer-focused marketer.

The four-point MSQ Model assesses the four fundamental competencies required for marketing relevance: strategic (how customer-focused are your marketing efforts?), analytical (how strategic and actionable is your customer insight?), technical (how well-suited is your infrastructure to support customer-focused marketing?) and process (how collaborative, efficient and error-free is your marketing organization?).

Each competency is weighted and combined to yield an overall Relevance Maturity Score which defines a MSQ Level ranging from 1 (broadcast) to 5 (integrated). Marketers can use the model in conjunction with the MSQ Self-Test to pinpoint their MSQ Level as well as identify the steps they must take in order to successfully move to the next level.

Other key findings and strategies from the study include:
1. Response to one-size-fits-all messaging is declining steadily. The report found that one retailer increased revenues by 500 percent by dividing its e-mail list into four segments and customizing the message to each group. In addition, a comparison of aggregate response data from companies leveraging broadcast tactics versus those using a highly targeted approach showed that the latter delivered significant improvement in open rates, clickthrough rates and clicks per open.

2.Marketers who want to increase marketing relevance must think outside in – from the perspective of the customer. The first step to relevancy requires marketers to clearly define relevancy to include timely response to customer actions, cross channel integration and a programmatic approach, the study found. Marketers must then develop a realistic action plan based on their current relevancy competency as assessed by the MSQ Model and measure and test every step of their program improvements.

3. Without the right technologies, relevant marketing is impossible. Technologies that increase marketing relevance should be made for marketers, and include functionality for automation, collaboration and integration – with little or no IT expertise needed. The report identifies emerging software-as-service options are a boon for marketers looking for lower up-front investment costs, to reduce IT involvement and to decrease time to market.

To receive a full copy of the Marketing Beyond the Status Quo report, visit www.responsys.com/beyond.

Check it out!