Chicago With a Purpose: Wrapping up the DMA2013 Session Picks

With apology, I want to say that this blog is a little about me—what topics I’m interested in, and sharing a little bit of this knowledge (or lack of knowledge) with blog readers. In the process, I’m hopeful you’re doing the same bit of pre-conference research—because it is this forethought and planning, beyond the engagements and booth visits on the Exhibit Hall floor, which make for a truly informative DMA13 conference

With apology, I want to say that this blog is a little about me—what topics I’m interested in, and sharing a little bit of this knowledge (or lack of knowledge) with blog readers. In the process, I’m hopeful you’re doing the same bit of pre-conference research—because it is this forethought and planning, beyond the engagements and booth visits on the Exhibit Hall floor, which make for a truly informative DMA13 conference

With the Direct Marketing Association Annual Conference starting literally at the end of this week, I’m still at it here lining up MyDMA2013 schedule with sessions I’d like to attend—admittedly doing some double-booking because of the great, comprehensive content on offer.

Yes clients and professional colleagues are on hand, and I’ll be sitting in on some of their sessions—but my guideposts for session picks are simply the subjects to which I welcome new learning, new updates and state-of-the-art in data-driven marketing such as it is. That’s why “The DMA” is always a conference attendance “must.”

A few weeks back, I cataloged some of first-impression session and events picks here: http://targetmarketing.adweek.com/blog/creeping-up-fast-dma13-making-plans-chicago

I’m hopeful our paths will cross in Chicago as I add 10+1 to the session wish list here…

  1. Who drives client relationships and customer engagement today? Advertising. “Mad Men + Data Specialists: When Two Worlds Collide,” Tuesday, Oct. 15, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
  2. Follow the money (and media) trail… “Outlook 2014: Data Driven Marketing in an Omnichannel World,” with The Winterberry Group’s Bruce Biegel, darnnit, also Tuesday, Oct. 15, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
  3. And trending too, “B2B Trends in 2014” with SAP’s Jerry Nichols, B-to-B magazine’s Chris Hosford and leading biz marketing consultant Pam Ansley Evans: Monday, Oct. 14, 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  4. “The Big Data Ecosystem: Informing Effective Marketing Campaigns,” with Time Warner Cable—curses, also yet again, Tuesday, Oct.15, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. This is really a parochial pick, since my apartment building is now allowing RCN to enter my building—and I’m curious to see (finally) if TWC will give me a better deal on pricing its services.
  5. Multichannel (yet digital) ROI—too bad we don’t have offline here, too, but it has some client-side folks, “No BS, Strictly ROI: Definitive Case Study Panel on Successful Multichannel Digital Marketing” with Intercontinental Hotels Group, Travel Impressions, Equifax and FedEx, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
  6. Pinterest + Email = Customer Engagement, with Sony and (disclosure, former client) The Agency Inside Harte-Hanks—now here’s a social media case study that taps Pinterest users, first I’ve seen in a venue that I’ve attended, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  7. “Creative Masterclass” with “THE” Herschell Gordon Lewis, and it won’t be a horror film classic (one of Herschell’s other talents), but I know it will be entertaining, focusing as it will on word choices and testing with minimal waste. Afterall, we all should test and choose our words carefully, on Monday, Oct. 14, 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  8. “USPS Goes Mobile: Direct Mail Integration with Mobile Technology”—hey this is a postal-focused blog, and USPS is offering postage discounts here, so there is money to be made/saved: Monday, Oct. 14, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
  9. Evaluating marketing service providers—”Why You Must Look at Least Three: Solutions Showdown.” Yes Bernice Grossman—database marketing extraordinaire—has lined up Neolane, SDL and IBM to help us evaluate and compare leading trigger-marketing vendors, on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2 p.m. to3 p.m
  10. The elusive attribution question gets answered, at least by Petco: “Power-Up: How Petco Uses IBM Marketing to Drive Attribution.” OK, this is an IBM-sponsored track on real-time and automated marketing, but I know many brands struggle with attribution assignment in multichannel and omnichannel environments, so I’d like to hear this case study, Monday, Oct. 14, oh well also 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
  11. AND a BONUS: Speaking of real-time marketing, my editor Thorin McGee at Target Marketing, is moderating his own panel on “Real-Time Marketing: Tools and Techniques to Own the Moment,” on Wednesday, 10 am – 10:45 am. Do I get extra credit for mentioning this one? Afterall, this blog post was a bit behind his deadline—though I’m hopeful it will be posted on time!

See you in Chicago!

Creeping Up Fast: DMA13 and Making Plans for Chicago

August 6 marked the mid-point of summer—so now we’re closer to summer’s end than summer’s beginning. It’s as if all the back-to-school advertising wasn’t enough to have us looking forward (except perhaps for schoolchildren). In the world of data-driven marketing, my mailbox reminded me this past week, too, that fall is just around the corner: I received a DMA2013 conference brochure mailer

The other day (August 6) marked the mid-point of summer—so now we’re closer to summer’s end than summer’s beginning.

It’s as if all the back-to-school advertising wasn’t enough to have us looking forward (except perhaps for schoolchildren). In the world of data-driven marketing, my mailbox reminded me this past week, too, that fall is just around the corner: I received a DMA2013 conference brochure mailer (October 12-17, McCormick Place West, Chicago). We’re eight weeks out from DMA2013, which means it’s time to start getting very serious, rather than spontaneous, in making our must-attend conference experience the best it can be. (Yes, I’m already registered—and you should be, too.)

For me, this is when I review the print brochure to dog-ear my go-to sessions based on the session titles, speakers and descriptions, and start the online process at MyDMA2013 (by Vivastream) to pinpoint an attempt at an “aspirational” schedule. I call this aspirational—let’s face it, when we get on site, business conversations inevitably happen, and diversions of all kinds are bound to take place.

However, there are some absolutes in my DMA13 calendar—and I’m hopeful you’ll agree.

1. Give Back
The first item isn’t even about DMA. It’s Marketing EDGE (formerly Direct Marketing Educational Foundation) and its Annual Awards Dinner (separate ticket required). This event has always been a go-to, but it’s also evolved to become the first, best networking opportunity for all of us as we gather at the DMA conference each year. These are the VIPs, roughly 400 leaders and future leaders in our business, and here is an organization where our proceeds bring the best and brightest into our field. What a powerful combination, and an affirmation of the future of data-driven, integrated marketing. Even if you don’t attend the conference, you can sponsor a professor’s attendance and make a donation at the aforementioned link.

2. What’s Next?
On Wednesday, Oct. 16, the day after the exhibit hall closes—I tell my clients that’s when the real learning begins. What do I mean by that somewhat on-its-face silly statement? That’s when the conference attendees—folks who are real serious about learning—are in the session rooms early, taking notes, and becoming better marketing professionals during the last half-day of sessions, and the post-conference workshops and day-and-a-half certifications. On that final day of the main conference, DMA13’s Main Conference Keynote panel at 11 am (all times Central), will feature “What’s NeXt: A Look through the Lens” with Direct Marketing Hall of Famer Rance Crain of Advertising Age interviewing BlueKai and foursquare execs Omar Tawakol and Steven Rosenblatt.

3. Stand Up
I’m a member of DMA for many reasons—but certainly advocacy is one of them. A lot of my clients literally are focused day-to-day on campaign development and implementation in an omnichannel world, and often don’t dwell on the policy implications that affect it. DMA13 offers marketing execs a chance to listen in, catch up and make sure that policy—legal, ethical, best practice—is aligned with our strategy and execution, and that innovation is fostered across all media channels that customers use. Hence, I will be attending DMA President & CEO Linda Woolley’s address “Listen to the Data” (Monday, Oct. 14, 8:45 a.m.) and Spotlight Session on Privacy: “Top 5 Privacy Issues … Revealed” moderated by Ginger Conlon, editor-in-chief of DMNews, with panelists from DMA (Jerry Cerasale), Eloqua (Dennis Dayman) and LoyaltyOne (Bryan Pearson). Responsible data collection and use is clearly under threat from Washington and elsewhere—we need to stand up for ourselves.

4. Inspired and a Party, Too
What’s the best proof point about data-driven marketing’s success—worldwide? If I had the chance to grab a policymaker and make them sit down and see what data-driven marketing can do—I would make him or her attend what I’m hopeful all DMA2013 delegates will attend: the 2013 DMA International ECHO Awards Gala, “Data-Driven Marketing’s Most Important Night” (separate registration required—and well worth it, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 6:30 pm to whenever). I’ve seen a sneak peak of what’s in store for this year’s gala, and this will be not only a Chicago-size party, with a DJ and Comedian Jake Johansen as host, but also truly a celebration of courageous brands, innovative agencies and the marketing strategies, creative executions and outstanding results that leave me—and many others—inspired. Left-brain, data-driven marketing combined with right-brain creative genius—what a combination for brands in both consumer and business-to-business marketing.

That’s enough for now—with more to come. Feel free to post your DMA13 “would be” favorites for blog readers below … and by all means, get yourself and your colleagues registered if you haven’t already. Get a game plan together, the conference is coming fast!

Interact Virtually at InterACT!

I’m excited to tell you about a new virtual event that’s taking place on Aug. 23 produced by Target Marketing, DirectMarketingIQ and Printing Impressions, eM+C’s sister brands.

I’m excited to tell you about a new virtual event that’s taking place on Aug. 23 produced by Target Marketing, DirectMarketingIQ and Printing Impressions, eM+C’s sister brands.

It’s called InterACT! Virtual Conference & Expo, and it’s a free virtual event (attendees can access all sessions from their computer) that will explore multiple marketing channels, tools and techniques and how they work together for maximum success. Topics of discussion include:

  • multichannel lead nurturing — turning prospects into customers;
  • QR codes — scanning your way to success;
  • integrated marketing ideas (that work!);
  • augmented reality marketing;
  • social media case studies; and
  • so much more!

I’m particularly excited about a session I’m moderating titled Customer-Preferred Marketing: Data Predicts What Channels to Use Next. Stephanie Miller, eM+C blogger and vice president of email and digital services at Aprimo, will discuss how marketers gather, analyze and, most importantly, utilize demographic, behavioral and social data to improve the subscriber experience and earn higher response and revenue.

There will also be plenty of opportunities for attendees to interact with their peers via live chats and social networking opportunities, as well as downloadable resources and giveaways to be had. Register for this free event here.

I hope to “see” you there!

Blog: Direct Marketing School Still in Session

The virtual show. Anyone been to one yet? I have to admit, my first real attendance to any such show was to our very own, Direct Marketing Day @ Your Desk, which I helped organize. And I was sold, especially after seeing the numbers.

The virtual show. Anyone been to one yet? I have to admit, my first real attendance to any such show was to our very own, Direct Marketing Day @ Your Desk, which I helped organize (check out the agenda and, if interested, attend the on-demand version). And I was sold, especially after seeing the numbers (sponsorship dollars, yes, but mostly noticing how many people registered … nearly 3,000).

The reason is simple: A virtual show is just so convenient. You can pick and choose your sessions, attend only the ones that are truly relevant for you (or view on-demand later on), chat with select others in the networking lounge (or break off into a private chat), browse the exhibit hall … all with great ease, without leaving your office. No travel, no hotel (okay, that part I kind of miss), no great local restaurants (wait, not sure if I like this suddenly), no business cards from people I’ll never see again (that’s the spirit) and, biggest thing of all, no giant wrench getting thrown into your work schedule.

In other words, it can be a highly productive day, or half-day, or even hour if you only go to one session. Meanwhile, you’re still in your own office, so you can still get your own work done.

While the need for in-person events remains (I just spoke at the DMA’s Circulation Day in New York City and made a connection with people that transcends the vitual connect, significantly), the level of learning and networking is only going to increase in future virtual conferences.

How Dell Leverages Social Media Across the Company

While attending the eTail East conference in Baltimore this week,  I was pleasantly surprised at what seems to be a pattern in online retail shows this year. While the show was small, all the sessions were packed. And everyone seemed to be in generally good spirits — despite the economic situation.

While attending the eTail East conference in Baltimore this week, I was pleasantly surprised at what seems to be a pattern in online retail shows this year. While the show was small, all the sessions were packed. And everyone seemed to be in generally good spirits — despite the economic situation.

One session I attended on Aug. 5 featured Liana Frey, the director of communities and conversations at Dell. Her session, “Community 2.0 — Lessons Learned From Engaging in Conversations With Customers,” focused on the success of the Round Rock, Texas-based firm’s use of social media.

Dell’s successful use of social media has been well documented. Dell Outlet, for example, has attributed $3 million in revenue to its presence on Twitter, where the division posts its latest offers.

What’s more, Dell Outlet has almost 1 million Twitter followers and is a “recommended” presence to follow by Twitter. It also occasionally makes “Twitter-only” offers available to followers.

Dell has put a concerted effort into its social media programs, according to Frey. It started them through a small group that was part of its corporate communications department. Today, however, social media is embedded throughout the entire organization.

“We’ve changed our organizational structure so that our tech department can answer specific technical questions through Twitter, and our customer service department can answer customer service questions,” she said.

While Frey admitted there’s some risk to this approach — where someone may say something that’s inappropriate, despite the social training, and damage the brand — she added that using this approach was worth the risk.

“We had enough confidence in our employees’ expertise that we felt it was important to make them transparent,” she said.

At lunch later that day, many folks agreed with Frey’s comments. Almost all of my tablemates said that for social media to work, it has to be part of a corporation’s culture. And, most importantly, there has to be buy-in from the top of the corporate structure — the CEO or president.

Do you agree? Let me know by leaving a comment here.