Eagles Beating Patriots in Super Bowl Social Media

Talkwalker has released its final social media trend numbers before the Super Bowl, and they say, “If hashtags were touchdowns, the Philadelphia Eagles look to win in a relative blowout.”

Talkwalker has released its final social media trend numbers before the Super Bowl, and they say, “If hashtags were touchdowns, the Philadelphia Eagles look to win in a relative blowout.”

#FlyEaglesFly has over 96,000 mentions, while #Eagles itself is over 80,691.

Meanwhile, #GoPats has over 60,000 mentions, #Patriots just over 43,000, and Patriots rallying cry #NotDone has over 32,000.

All tolled, Eagles win: 176,767 to 135,846. (So, if you’re betting, take the WAY over.)

But the teams themselves aren’t the only hashtags getting love in the run up to the Super Bowl. In fact, Talkwalker counted more than 8 million social posts related to the Super Bowl over the past month, and 113,000 of them were talking about the ads, 51,000 in the last week alone.

If you ever wonder why so many advertisers now release their Super Bowl commercials ahead of the big game, that’s why. The pre-game hype can be a bigger social boost than the game itself.

Leading the league in trending social posts so far is this Instagram from Vanessa Hudgens about Stella Artois’s partnership with Matt Damon and water.org.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BeYNyRUjCrx/

The early ad wars are shaping up, too, with Amazon and Budweiser leading the way in social mentions:

  1. Amazon 10,692
  2. Budweiser 5,958
  3. Lexus 5,226
  4. M&Ms 4,275
  5. Bud Light 3,870

These aren’t idle numbers. While a social mention, share or like doesn’t lead directly to sales, it is a good indicator of brand mind share heading into and coming out of the Super Bowl. The real question is, who’ll be able to capitalize on the buzz Monday morning.

You Are What You Share: Why Videos Go Viral

What makes a video go viral? Is it because it includes kids, kittens or puppies? Or is it because there’s something much deeper? If you want your articles or videos to be shared, you must understand why and how your content will reflect on the individual sharing it.

What Makes Your Video Go Viral?For more on how to go viral, don’t miss Gary’s session on the All About Direct Marketing Virtual Conference, on May 4! Click here to register.

What makes a video go viral? Is it because it includes kids, kittens or puppies? Or is it because there’s something much deeper? If you want your articles or videos to be shared, you must understand why and how your content will reflect on the individual sharing it.

Why Shares Go Viral

Neuroscience and other research studies suggest that for a video to go viral, there are several deep-seated ingredients that must come together.

A study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania neuroscience research lab team recorded brain activity from participants about how they reacted to New York Times health articles. Brain activity suggests that people have a two-part process to decide what to share on social media, and it all points to how shared articles or videos shape their identity:

  • Social relationships: How sharing an article or video will reflect on you
  • Developing self-image: Will friends be interested in the article or video?

In other words, people share things that they believe will improve their relationships, make them appear smart or, in one way or another, look favorable.

You Are What You Share

The deep dive, on a simple sharing impulse, is that your brain looks for information to share with others. It’s how we’re wired. Additional reasons for shares:

  1. To express who we really are
  2. To convey a sense of our ideal self and aspirations
  3. To nurture relationships

In a New York Times study titled “The Psychology of Sharing: Why Do People Share Online?” six sharing personality types where described:

  1. Altruists: Motivated to bring valuable content to those they care about
  2. Careerists: Focused on developing a strong network of personal and professional contacts.
  3. Hipsters: They like to start a conversation, debate or controversy. They are always looking to connect with like-minded people.
  4. Boomerangs: Motivated primarily by reactions; they like to start a debate and generate comments.
  5. Connectors: For them, they share mutual experiences and including others.
  6. Selectives: Shares information they feel will be of value to a specific person.

This same study found that 68 percent share to define themselves. Eighty-four percent share to support causes or brands that they care about.

In other words, you are what you share. You share to express who you are, deep inside.