WWTT? Shutterstock Pokes Fun at Moon Landing Conspiracy

In Shutterstock’s latest iteration of its “It’s Not Stock, It’s Shutterstock” campaign — its first campaign in six years — the company both celebrates the Moon landing and makes the case for how, if it wasn’t real, Shutterstock has all the tools needed to recreate such a momentous event.

On July 20, 1969, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to step foot on the Moon, while Michael Collins orbited from above in the Apollo 11 command module, Columbia. It was a historic and scientifically important moment, and sadly, there are conspiracy theorists who think it was faked. In Shutterstock’s latest iteration of its “It’s Not Stock, It’s Shutterstock” campaign — its first campaign in six years — the company both celebrates the Moon landing and makes the case for how, if it real wasn’t, Shutterstock has all the tools needed to recreate such a momentous event.

Aside from the video, Shutterstock created a specific page with all of its royalty-free images and video related to space and the Moon landing, and included an offer of 11% off image and video pricing, good through July 31. The stock image and video company’s Twitter account also shared a few tweets which point back to the page, and include relevant media that’s sure to catch someone’s attention.

Ad Age complied a list of 11 marketing campaigns that are riding the celebratory wave of the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing, ranging from Elysian Brewing to Dairy Queen and more. While a lot of the campaigns are just celebratory in nature and try to benefit from associating with the historically significant event, it’s interesting to see Shutterstock’s take on it.

While, yes, the campaign does celebrate the Moon landing, it also references the darker side of the story: Moon landing conspiracies. And honestly, Shutterstock’s products — royalty free stock images and video — line up well with the idea of staging/recreating an event. As the website copy reads:

We believe the Moon landing happened …
We’re just saying that if it didn’t, Shutterstock has everything you need to make it look like it did.

The campaign is clever, timely, relevant … but is it enough to get a boost in sales for the second half of the month?

Definitely check the Ad Age article I referenced above, and otherwise, leave a comment below about what you think of Shutterstock’s timely campaign!

Dissolve’s Direct Mail and the Power of Print

For as long as I’ve been with Who’s Mailing What!, I’ve been impressed by the power of direct mail to sell, well … just about anything. One of my favorite things has always been any mail selling stock art, typography, and images.

For as long as I’ve been with Who’s Mailing What!, I’ve loved the power of direct mail to sell, well … just about anything. One of my favorite things has always been any mail selling stock art, typography, and images.

Shutterstock_01For a long time, graphic designers I knew would forward to me eye-catching creative mail like this postcard from Shutterstock. Hilarious, right? OK, full disclosure: I own a cat.

VeerHi_21And I’ve mentioned before this secret society campaign from Veer. This “Members Handbook” booklet is filled with rules of conduct, special handshakes, code phrases, some riddles, and typography humor.

Although most marketing for images is now conducted via digital channels, some companies still use direct mail in their mix.

The company that’s really captured my attention recently is Dissolve, a stock footage and photo provider based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Like some companies, they mail catalogs that are pretty traditional in how they show images from their video and photo collections.

But they also take chances by trying different approaches. A few weeks ago, I wrote about their blank story books and postcards that are great involvement devices.

Last month, Dissolve sent out a brilliant photonovel mail piece titled “Fantastic Footage.” My colleague Ashley Roberts of Printing Impressions got the scoop on this effort. The company’s Lori Burwash told her, “it’s an interesting challenge to convey video in print.”

Please check out Ashley’s fun, insightful take in her “Who’s Mailing What! Confidential” video below.

[brightcove videoplayer=”5115842574001″ playerid=”4057790005001″ playerkey=”AQ~~,AAAB3F0Fgjk~,iLMUk1o09xryy1Ypo80LdwzRrrPX3phQ” width=”480″ height=”270″ autostart=”false”]

These guys get what good, compelling direct mail is all about. With this campaign, the UV soft touch coating and high quality photography grabs me from the start. And, they get their marketing messages in like they should. As Burwash put it, “we like to create pieces that feel like gifts.”

We like them too.