Chicago With a Purpose: Wrapping up the DMA2013 Session Picks

With apology, I want to say that this blog is a little about me—what topics I’m interested in, and sharing a little bit of this knowledge (or lack of knowledge) with blog readers. In the process, I’m hopeful you’re doing the same bit of pre-conference research—because it is this forethought and planning, beyond the engagements and booth visits on the Exhibit Hall floor, which make for a truly informative DMA13 conference

With apology, I want to say that this blog is a little about me—what topics I’m interested in, and sharing a little bit of this knowledge (or lack of knowledge) with blog readers. In the process, I’m hopeful you’re doing the same bit of pre-conference research—because it is this forethought and planning, beyond the engagements and booth visits on the Exhibit Hall floor, which make for a truly informative DMA13 conference

With the Direct Marketing Association Annual Conference starting literally at the end of this week, I’m still at it here lining up MyDMA2013 schedule with sessions I’d like to attend—admittedly doing some double-booking because of the great, comprehensive content on offer.

Yes clients and professional colleagues are on hand, and I’ll be sitting in on some of their sessions—but my guideposts for session picks are simply the subjects to which I welcome new learning, new updates and state-of-the-art in data-driven marketing such as it is. That’s why “The DMA” is always a conference attendance “must.”

A few weeks back, I cataloged some of first-impression session and events picks here: http://targetmarketing.adweek.com/blog/creeping-up-fast-dma13-making-plans-chicago

I’m hopeful our paths will cross in Chicago as I add 10+1 to the session wish list here…

  1. Who drives client relationships and customer engagement today? Advertising. “Mad Men + Data Specialists: When Two Worlds Collide,” Tuesday, Oct. 15, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
  2. Follow the money (and media) trail… “Outlook 2014: Data Driven Marketing in an Omnichannel World,” with The Winterberry Group’s Bruce Biegel, darnnit, also Tuesday, Oct. 15, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
  3. And trending too, “B2B Trends in 2014” with SAP’s Jerry Nichols, B-to-B magazine’s Chris Hosford and leading biz marketing consultant Pam Ansley Evans: Monday, Oct. 14, 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  4. “The Big Data Ecosystem: Informing Effective Marketing Campaigns,” with Time Warner Cable—curses, also yet again, Tuesday, Oct.15, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. This is really a parochial pick, since my apartment building is now allowing RCN to enter my building—and I’m curious to see (finally) if TWC will give me a better deal on pricing its services.
  5. Multichannel (yet digital) ROI—too bad we don’t have offline here, too, but it has some client-side folks, “No BS, Strictly ROI: Definitive Case Study Panel on Successful Multichannel Digital Marketing” with Intercontinental Hotels Group, Travel Impressions, Equifax and FedEx, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
  6. Pinterest + Email = Customer Engagement, with Sony and (disclosure, former client) The Agency Inside Harte-Hanks—now here’s a social media case study that taps Pinterest users, first I’ve seen in a venue that I’ve attended, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  7. “Creative Masterclass” with “THE” Herschell Gordon Lewis, and it won’t be a horror film classic (one of Herschell’s other talents), but I know it will be entertaining, focusing as it will on word choices and testing with minimal waste. Afterall, we all should test and choose our words carefully, on Monday, Oct. 14, 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  8. “USPS Goes Mobile: Direct Mail Integration with Mobile Technology”—hey this is a postal-focused blog, and USPS is offering postage discounts here, so there is money to be made/saved: Monday, Oct. 14, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
  9. Evaluating marketing service providers—”Why You Must Look at Least Three: Solutions Showdown.” Yes Bernice Grossman—database marketing extraordinaire—has lined up Neolane, SDL and IBM to help us evaluate and compare leading trigger-marketing vendors, on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2 p.m. to3 p.m
  10. The elusive attribution question gets answered, at least by Petco: “Power-Up: How Petco Uses IBM Marketing to Drive Attribution.” OK, this is an IBM-sponsored track on real-time and automated marketing, but I know many brands struggle with attribution assignment in multichannel and omnichannel environments, so I’d like to hear this case study, Monday, Oct. 14, oh well also 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
  11. AND a BONUS: Speaking of real-time marketing, my editor Thorin McGee at Target Marketing, is moderating his own panel on “Real-Time Marketing: Tools and Techniques to Own the Moment,” on Wednesday, 10 am – 10:45 am. Do I get extra credit for mentioning this one? Afterall, this blog post was a bit behind his deadline—though I’m hopeful it will be posted on time!

See you in Chicago!

Interact Virtually at InterACT!

I’m excited to tell you about a new virtual event that’s taking place on Aug. 23 produced by Target Marketing, DirectMarketingIQ and Printing Impressions, eM+C’s sister brands.

I’m excited to tell you about a new virtual event that’s taking place on Aug. 23 produced by Target Marketing, DirectMarketingIQ and Printing Impressions, eM+C’s sister brands.

It’s called InterACT! Virtual Conference & Expo, and it’s a free virtual event (attendees can access all sessions from their computer) that will explore multiple marketing channels, tools and techniques and how they work together for maximum success. Topics of discussion include:

  • multichannel lead nurturing — turning prospects into customers;
  • QR codes — scanning your way to success;
  • integrated marketing ideas (that work!);
  • augmented reality marketing;
  • social media case studies; and
  • so much more!

I’m particularly excited about a session I’m moderating titled Customer-Preferred Marketing: Data Predicts What Channels to Use Next. Stephanie Miller, eM+C blogger and vice president of email and digital services at Aprimo, will discuss how marketers gather, analyze and, most importantly, utilize demographic, behavioral and social data to improve the subscriber experience and earn higher response and revenue.

There will also be plenty of opportunities for attendees to interact with their peers via live chats and social networking opportunities, as well as downloadable resources and giveaways to be had. Register for this free event here.

I hope to “see” you there!

Marketing Best Practices, Grateful Dead Style

OK, I admit it. For a short time in my youth, I could have been considered a “dead head.” Granted, I only attended about 10 “shows,” but I did have a Grateful Dead bumper sticker on my car and wore quite a bit of tie-dye.

OK, I admit it. For a short time in my youth, I could have been considered a “dead head.” Granted, I only attended about 10 “shows,” but I did have a Grateful Dead bumper sticker on my car and wore quite a bit of tie-dye.

That’s why the press release promoting the new book, “Marketing Lessons from the Grateful Dead,” by David Meerman Scott, a marketing strategist, keynote speaker, seminar leader and author; and Brian Halligan, co-founder and CEO of HubSpot, caught my attention this week.

The release read: “Long before the terms ‘inbound marketing’ and ‘social media’ were coined, the Grateful Dead were using these strategies to become one of the most successful bands of all time.”

So true. The Grateful Dead never did much marketing or advertising, but everyone knew them and their music.

It continued: “They made a series of difficult and often unpopular decisions in order to differentiate themselves from their competition by providing the highest quality service to their fans, not just a product.”

I’m sure they pissed off quite a few music publishers by allowing fans to tape their own shows, but they knew that the music was what the fans wanted — and they delivered.

“The Grateful Dead can be considered one giant case study in doing social media marketing right,” said Halligan in the release. “Not only did they pioneer the freemium business model by allowing concert attendees to tape the show, but also encouraged their fans to build a community, and kept them informed via their newsletters.”

“Each chapter presents and analyzes a marketing concept practiced by the Dead and a real-world example of that concept in action today,” according to the release. Specific topics include:

  • Rethink traditional industry assumptions. Rather than focus on record albums as a primary revenue source (with touring to support album sales), the Dead created a business model focused on touring.
  • Turn your customers into evangelists. Unlike nearly every other band, the Grateful Dead not only encouraged concertgoers to record their live shows, they actually established “taper sections” where fans’ equipment could be set up for the best sound quality. The broad exposure led to millions of new fans and sold tickets to the live shows.
  • Bypass accepted channels and go direct. The Grateful Dead created a mailing list in the early 1970s where they announced tours to fans first. Later, they established their own ticketing office, providing the most loyal fans with the best seats in the house.
  • Build a huge, loyal following. The Grateful Dead let their audience define the Grateful Dead experience. Concerts were a happening, a destination where all 20,000 or more audience members were actually part of the experience.

I never thought about the Grateful Dead as a social media case study before, but it makes sense. Can’t wait to read the book! Now if I can only find my old T-shirt …