Converting Your Social Media Triple-Fs: Friends, Followers and Fans

I’ve heard many gurus, marketers and publishers brag about their social media followers. They’ll say things like, “Isn’t it great … I’ve got 10,000 fans on Facebook” or “I have more than 15,000 followers on Twitter.” Then I’ll ask them how many free e-newsletter subscribers they have. And they’ll reply, “I haven’t had time to build a list yet. I don’t have an e-newsletter.”

I’ve heard many gurus, marketers and publishers brag about their social media followers. They’ll say things like, “Isn’t it great … I’ve got 10,000 fans on Facebook” or “I have more than 15,000 followers on Twitter.” Then I’ll ask them how many free e-newsletter subscribers they have. And they’ll reply, “I haven’t had time to build a list yet. I don’t have an e-newsletter.”

Well, in my opinion, they’ve won only half the battle …

It’s fantastic that they have a following on social media—people who seem to be interested in their messages (posts) and their overall philosophy. They can certainly cultivate these relationships to assist in their marketing efforts. However, I remind these gurus that the “fans” are following them. It’s a passive relationship. And there’s an awful lot of background noise in a news feed that can distract their fans.

If you don’t have fans’ email addresses, then you cannot have one-on-one communications with them. Building and cultivating a list is a fundamental business strategy for sales growth.

In the publishing world, a list (email addresses of free or paid subscribers) is sacred. It’s one of the most valuable things you own. You protect it and treat it with care, because your list is your financial bread and butter. It’s made up of people—customers and subscribers—who can make or break your business through their purchasing power or lack thereof.

Your list is also your leverage—what you use when reaching out to other synergistic publishers and friendly competitors to do reciprocal JV (joint venture) swaps and revenue share deals.

So, if you’re an online publisher, guru or business owner who has social media followers but no list, you’re at a disadvantage. Initiate a plan to capture your fans’ email addresses immediately and get permission to open up the personal lines of communication.

I recommend that you make a special conversion effort to encourage social media followers to give you their email addresses, or, as we say, “opt in” to receive your marketing messages.

This typically involves creating strong promotional copy and a lead-generation landing page (also know as squeeze page), where the goal is to capture the email address of the friend, follower or fan.

The offer should be something that will resonate with your fan, such as a useful and relevant free bonus. Some popular examples are a whitepaper, e-newsletter or e-alert subscription, audio download, bonus video, webinar or teleseminar..

Some marketers also offer coupon codes or gift certificates in exchange for an email address or the option to be in a “VIP club,” where you’re the first to hear about special offers.

Freebies will vary based on what you have to offer in exchange. Ideally, this is something that has a perceived value and is immediate and relevant. You run the campaign for a two-week period at a time, mixing your conversion messages with your regular, organic daily posts. It’s ideal to drive traffic to specially coded pages so you can track traffic and conversions. You can also make sure your sign up box on your website’s home page is up and ready for stray organic traffic. Then you monitor email sign-ups and website traffic (via Google Analytics), to ensure list growth and traffic source referrals.

Aside from captivating copy, many variables come into play to make sure the effort is successful. These include making sure email collection fields are at the top, middle and bottom of the lead-generation landing page being used, as well as in a static (fixed) location on your website. There should also be links to your privacy policy and an assurance statement alleviating any concern about email addresses being rented or sold to third parties.

It’s also critical to clearly disclose before users submit their email addresses that opting in to receive your freebie also gives them a complimentary subscription to your e-newsletter (if applicable), along with special offers from time to time.

Finally, you should follow up with a series of autoresponder (targeted messages) emails welcoming your new subscribers, reminding them how they signed up, offering strong editorial content and special new subscriber offers.

These emails facilitate bonding; validate that the correct email was sent; ensures that the user is aware of the sign up; helps reduce false “do not mail” reports, email bounces and general attrition; and most importantly, improved life time value.

So before you get enamored with your Facebook following, realize that to monetize these names takes a conversion strategy. Once you start building your list, you’ll add a whole new value to your businesses valuation.

6 Factors to Align Direct Marketing Channels With Your Customers

Studies abound about which channels consumers prefer for receiving direct marketing messages. Some studies say consumers prefer direct mail. Others say it’s email. Then, there is the growing use of personalized web experience, social media, text messaging and other forms of messaging. The proliferation of devices and channels seems to be

Studies abound about which channels consumers prefer for receiving direct marketing messages. Some studies say consumers prefer direct mail. Others say it’s email. Then, there is the growing use of personalized web experience, social media, text messaging, and other forms of messaging. The proliferation of devices and channels seems to be unending.

In reality, your customers and prospects will demonstrate to you which channel they prefer, based on their actions. That’s what makes direct marketing what it is. But we are going to offer five qualitative factors, and one bottom line quantitative factor, to internally evaluate and align your message delivery strategy and channel with your customer and prospect’s preferences.

Qualitative factors for customer preference can include:

  1. Pure-play Sales Marketing vs. Content
    As customers and prospects are presented with marketing messages, do they view it as pure-play marketing (i.e., they see through it as your attempt to sell something), or as information and content that will be helpful to them? For example, publishers have succeeded for years when their messaging felt more like helpful information than a pitch to sell a subscription.
  2. Time Sensitivity
    Clearly an email can feel more time sensitive than direct mail, yet, experienced direct mail copywriters have for years been able to convey urgency in copy. But for your customers and prospects, other channels can be perceived as more time sensitive. Email, social media, telesales and even texting are channels that may feel most urgent.
  3. Shelf Life
    Email can vanish in a click. Direct mail can disappear in the trash bin (although it can be fished out of the trash). Higher production value catalogs and direct mail may be held onto longer than down-and-dirty printed packages. And higher production values (such as colors, textures, folds, tip-ons, stickers, die-cuts,and the visual impact of an 11×17 fold-out brochure) are impossible to convey in an email.
  4. How Did They Get My Name?
    Customers probably won’t be as concerned about privacy, but prospects can be much more sensitive. This can be especially the case if your offer touches on information such as health of personal finances. The trust factor is huge in prospects taking an action to pursue learning more about you, or making a purchase decision.
  5. How Do I Know You?
    Prospecting via email can be challenging to get opens and clicks. Run the numbers first (see our post on how to run the numbers). Direct mail for prospecting is getting more and more costly. Social media followers opt-in when they see you on various platforms or are referred to you by a friend. But consider that consumers often identify with social media as a personal platform, not necessarily as a place, to interact with marketing organizations. Better: Your prospect initiates the contact with you, and thus, become a lead. How do you do that? Content marketing, using those other online channels, can be a game-changer for you.

Quantitative Factors: As for quantitative factors you can use to align direct marketing to the media, there is really only one set of numbers to evaluate: Sales and cost per order (or per thousand). As an internal metric, when you evaluate your sales and cost per thousand, you can identify the ultimate metric to assess how your marketing messaging aligns with results.

Bottom line: Be aware of the studies that claim to have answers about which media channel customers prefer. But consider that you know your product better than anyone, you know the channel (or channels) that work for you, and you know your numbers. In a time when we’re awash in devices, channels, and choices, balance how you use each one so you’re aligned with how to drive cost-efficient sales.