Michael Della Penna’s Conversations: 5 Essential Technologies to Ignite and Manage Conversations

This month’s blog is all about the tools necessary to support a successful conversation. Over the last decade, I’ve had the privilege to be involved in building solutions that help brands connect and communicate with their customers and prospects. It’s from that experience that I present the five most essential tools in creating and sustaining a successful conversation with customers and prospects.

In my first blog I talked a lot about how you can overcome the fear of social media and embrace the medium so it can become an integral part of your overall marketing mix. My next post shined the spotlight on understanding your customers in order to build ongoing and successful conversations. My most recent effort demonstrated how B-to-B companies, like B-to-C companies, have much to gain by embracing social media. I highlighted specific examples of several social media programs that are making a measureable impact. All of which leads us to this month’s blog.

This month’s blog is all about the tools necessary to support a successful conversation. Over the last decade, I’ve had the privilege to be involved in building solutions that help brands connect and communicate with their customers and prospects. It’s from that experience that I present the five most essential tools in creating and sustaining a successful conversation with customers and prospects.

1. Email. Perhaps the most obvious one of the bunch. While email’s promise of facilitating one-to-one dialogs never really panned out, the effective use of dynamically-generated email communications based on subscribers’ profiles and/or behaviors help build timely and relevant conversations. While automated or triggered communications have been in practice for some time now, they are, in my opinion, not used often enough and are typically isolated to individual programs within the lifecycle communication strategy.

Therefore, although effective, triggered emails can rarely sustain the dialog over long periods of time and across different stages of the lifecycle. But the impact email has on conversations is hardly over. More recently, the emergence of social tools within email is on the rise. These tools encourage individuals to share content with their social networks, which then enables the conversation to be continued with a larger group across the social internet.

Look for email to remain a force for years to come as brands use targeted emails and Twitter to ignite discussions that are then continued and discussed in-depth on Facebook.

Top providers with both capabilities: ExactTarget, StrongMail (full disclosure: I sit on the board of directors at StongMail) and Yesmail.

2. Inbound reply handling. Who among us hasn’t used email to contact customer service? Who among us has been delighted by the experience? Truth be told, few, if any, of us have been delighted. Lackluster email response times continue to plague many brands, and often contribute to decreased customer satisfaction ratings.

While real-time social tools such as Twitter and CoTweet have emerged as critical tools for handling customer service inquires, sophisticated inbound reply handling for incoming inquiries via email is still essential to building and maintaining great conversations and satisfaction with customers.

Top providers: KANA, eGain.

3. Listening/monitoring tools. I’m a huge fan of listening tools. For many brands, it’s a natural starting point as they continue to search for the content that will best resonate with their customers and prospects. Listening to what consumers are saying about your brand and/or products often yields important insights. It may even provide you the context you need to spark a conversation around a shared passion or related topic that’s of great interest to the community. Listen carefully and use learnings from this listening to build conversations with critical customer segments and prospects.

Top providers: BuzzMetrics, Cymfony and Radian6.

4. Social media platforms.
The emergence of social media networks such as Facebook and microblogging networks such as Twitter opens up a whole new opportunity to connect and communicate with customers and prospects. According to a report from Nielsen, the average Facebook user now spends more than seven hours a month on the social network, which is more than three times the average time spent on Yahoo.

As social networks become more popular, so will the use of social media platforms. Like email, social media platforms enable brands to create, execute and manage real-time interactions and communications with fans and followers. In many respects, the emergence of social media platforms picks up where email left off — enabling communications with both individuals and groups who like your brand.

Top providers: Hootsuite, Objective Marketer, Spredfast and StrongMail.

5. Social communities and networks. Aside from the emergence of leading social networks like Facebook, brands are increasingly recognizing the power and benefit of building their own communities. These collaborative environments help brands capture customer ideas and feedback, allowing them to glean critical information from conversations between customers. Often the wisdom from these conversations results in new products and a culture of innovation. Look to see the continued growth of these proprietary communities as social and software combine to help build critical conversations that drive business success.

Top providers: Communispace, Jive Software.

There you have it: five essential technologies to help every brand create, execute and manage real-time, relevant conversations.

‘Til next time!

Melissa Campanelli’s The View From Here: What Marketers Can Learn From Divorce Attorneys

This week, I learned an interesting statistic about social networks: Eighty-one percent of the nation’s top divorce attorneys have seen an increase in the number of cases using social networking evidence during the past five years, according to a survey published earlier this year by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers. What’s more, Facebook holds the distinction of being the unrivaled leader for online divorce evidence, with 66 percent citing it as the primary source, according to the survey.

This week, I learned an interesting statistic about social networks: Eighty-one percent of the nation’s top divorce attorneys have seen an increase in the number of cases using social networking evidence during the past five years, according to a survey published earlier this year by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers. What’s more, Facebook holds the distinction of being the unrivaled leader for online divorce evidence, with 66 percent citing it as the primary source, according to the survey.

The main reason divorce attorneys use social networks is to track any possible contradictions to previously made statements and promises by estranged spouses. Apparently, it’s relatively easy for lawyers to gather this information, at least according to a June 1 article on CNN.com.

“It’s becoming all but impossible to protect your information, unless you spend hours and hours figuring it out,” said Lee Rosen, a divorce attorney in North Carolina, in the CNN.com article.

To be fair, Facebook has acknowldedgd that it’s gradually relaxed privacy settings over the last year, enabling some members’ personal details to be leaked without users realizing it. And, as a result, last month it announced new tools that make it easier for users to tighten privacy settings and block outside parties from seeing personal information.

Still, lawyers are relying on the sites and other social tools for gathering evidence. According to the CNN article, for example, they’re accessing sites such as Flowtown.com, which allows them to enter a peron’s email address into the site, and the site returns various social media profiles on that person.

I thought this sounded interesting, so I investigated. It seems that Flowtown was co-founded in January 2009 by Ethan Bloch, a serial entrepreneur who founded his first business at the tender age of 13.

Flowtown, according to its website, is a “platform that businesses use to connect with their customers everywhere in the social web. Companies like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and MySpace have made it standard practice, for all of us, to publicly share information about ourselves. Flowtown helps make sense of all this data and turns it into meaningful output in the form of stronger business relationships.”

I thought I’d give it a whirl. I registered on the site (it took all of 60 seconds), added a few of my personal email addresses, and bam, within seconds my Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn profiles appeared. While it took me aback, it made me realize what a powerful tool this could be for marketers.

Imagine importing entire email lists into your system and getting access to thousands of customers’ social networking profiles. This information could be used to track which customers are key influencers talking about your brand (or your competition), as well as what your customers’ interests are.

What do you think? Have you ever used Flowtown.com? Let me know by posting a comment below.

5 E-Marketing Lessons from Social Media News Links

“The stories and issues that gain traction in social media differ substantially from those that lead in the mainstream press,” says the Pew Research Center‘s Project for Excellence in Journalism in a recent study, expanded here on Journalism.org. “But they also differ greatly from each other.” These differences highlight traits in these mediums that e-marketers must understand to effectively market through social media channels.

“The stories and issues that gain traction in social media differ substantially from those that lead in the mainstream press,” says the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism in a recent study, expanded here on Journalism.org. “But they also differ greatly from each other.” These differences highlight traits in these mediums that e-marketers must understand to effectively market through social media channels.

1. “Bloggers gravitated toward stories that elicited emotion, concerned individual or group rights, or triggered ideological passion,” according to Pew’s report on the study. Obviously this highlights the partisan boil of recent U.S. politics, but it also exhibits what bloggers want: something to talk about. To have a marketing or PR campaign picked up in the same way, it has to be a conversation starter, something that inspires bloggers and their readers to comment. If you’re going to feed bloggers, make sure there’s meat on the bones.

2. Bloggers gravitate toward newsy items more than opinions. According to Jounalism.org’s expanded report, 83 percent of the news items bloggers link to are news reports, and only 13 percent are opinion pieces. This makes sense when you consider that bloggers want to voice their own opinions on subjects, and are therefore more likely to pick up stories that report — or publicize — core facts about which they can pontificate. Your own opinionated items tend to speak for themselves, and could get picked up by bloggers more to argue against than discuss.

3. For Twitter users, “the mission is primarily about passing along important — often breaking — information in a way that unifies or assumes shared values within the Twitter community.” Twitter is known for its discussions, but it’s not a great discussion space. Updates are fast, widespread, easy to ignore and perfect for passing on actionable information: “Company X is giving away free thingamajigs! LINK. #YourCompany.”

4. YouTube’s “most watched videos have a strong sense of serendipity. They pique interest and curiosity with a strong visual appeal. The ‘Hey, you’ve got to see this,’ mentality rings strong.” However, videos don’t have to be funny or outrageous. Outrageousness can seem like the only videos that go viral because that’s what shows on the web and TV (“Web Soup,” “Tosh.0”) make famous. But any video that’s really interesting can go viral and drive sales. Companies like Dynomighty Design have had success driving whole product campaigns with simple videos showing how cool their products are, such as this video for the company’s magnetic jewelry.

5. “Across all three social platforms … attention spans are brief.” This goes both for the length of the message and the length of time it’ll remain relevant. The majority of top stories remained top stories for no more than three days, especially on Twitter. The study also found that social media picked stories up much more quickly than traditional media. Combined, these traits mean lift can be short from any one message. A marketing or PR message delivered on Sunday and picked up by Tuesday will likely lose its buzz before the weekend.

Craig Greenfield’s Redefining Performance Marketing: 3 Ways to Turn Earned Media Insights Into Paid and Owned/Organic Gold

It’s quickly becoming common knowledge that earned media outlets, if properly mined, can provide unique insights into what resonates most with marketers’ audiences. With the proper tools and techniques, marketers can begin to answer questions such as the following:

It’s quickly becoming common knowledge that earned media outlets, if properly mined, can provide unique insights into what resonates most with marketers’ audiences. With the proper tools and techniques, marketers can begin to answer questions such as the following:

  • Who’s talking about your brand?
  • How’s your audience discussing your brand?
  • What themes, topics and links permeate the conversation?
  • What are users querying about your brand or the vertical in general?
  • What’s the phraseology they’re using?

Simple collection methods include using social listening tools to understand customer conversations on social sites; managing profile pages on Facebook and/or Twitter to gain customer feedback; and mining query data to get a better idea of customer intent. However, to turn earned media insights into paid and owned/organic gold, brands need practical tactics for leveraging and applying the information.

Moving from insights to action

Earned media can create more effective paid media campaigns through the use of social listening tools to build out keywords for a client’s paid search campaign. Performics has done this for a number of clients, specifically in the apparel vertical. After a retailer’s recent product launch, Performics used its proprietary social listening tool to identify top themes that its client’s customers were discussing on social sites.

Performics focused analysis on brand-related conversations, and then filtered those posts by topic to only view conversations around the new product line. The retailer was able to identify all relevant phrases and terms, such as “military jacket” and “bf blazer,” that customers associated with its new product launch.

To assess the value of these newly identified phrases/terms, the retailer took into account the sentiment, frequency and reach of each. Performics’ listening tool assigns sentiment — positive, negative and/or neutral — to every customer post collected. Any customer post or tweet, for example, that included the term “military jacket” was assigned a sentiment value. The posts referring to “military jacket” were generally positive; therefore, that term was assigned positive sentiment.

The social listening tool also helps evaluate the influence of those selected phrases/terms. The retailer was able to assess the value of “military jacket” compared to other terms by understanding the number of customers using this term (frequency) and the number of followers exposed to the term (reach). The tool helped to quickly identify the most valuable phrases/terms relevant to the brand and product that were appearing within customer conversations. The phrases/terms then became the baseline for building out additional keywords for the new product launch.

Varied application of insights

How can marketers apply information gained from earned media? Three suggestions to get started include the following:

  • keyword buildout for search campaigns (paid and organic);
  • content campaign development; and
  • creative development.

As more consumers take to social sites to converse, performance marketers should continually be mindful of ways to make insight from these conversations actionable.

Margie Chiu’s 15 Minutes Ahead: Observations from SXSW – Checking Into Geosocial

SXSW 2010 has come and gone, but to the dismay of press, attendees and those who yearn to claim “I was there when … ,” there was no sign of the next breakout app at this year’s event. Instead, the consensus was that geosocial – the convergence of location-based data and social networking – was the unexpected star of the event. 

What’s the big deal with SXSW?
South by Southwest Interactive (SXSW) has become the must-attend annual event for the digerati. Some of the brightest digital starlets in recent years, including Twitter and foursquare, were first “discovered” at SXSW. Those in attendance at Twitter’s launch in 2007 and foursquare’s in 2009 still delight in having the bragging rights to “I knew them when … ”

So what created the buzz this year?
SXSW 2010 has come and gone, but to the dismay of press, attendees and those who yearn to claim “I was there when … ,” there was no sign of the next breakout app at this year’s event.

Instead, the consensus was that geosocial — the convergence of location-based data and social networking — was the unexpected star of the event. Take, for example, the thoughts of one venture capitalist interviewed by The Wall Street Journal: “One thing that was interesting was it ended up being a little of a social experiment with everybody there. All 17,000 or 18,000 people were connected on Twitter, Foursquare and Gowalla. It served almost as a big test for what would the world be like when people start adopting all these social tools.”

There was definitely no shortage of tweets and foursquare check-ins. In fact, foursquare set up 16 new badges and other exclusives for the event. Gowalla, foursquare’s rival location-based social network, also put its best foot forward. (Side note: Gowalla was also launched last year at SXSW, but like Jan Brady to Marsha, Gowalla has largely been in the shadows of foursquare. But Jan got her day; Gowalla beat out foursquare this year as SXSW’s best site in the mobile category.

So what actually happened?

I decided to dig a little deeper into this delightful microcosm of SXSW where “everybody” was connected.

First of all, most SXSW venues only had foursquare check-in rates in the double digits. On average, SXSW tagged locations registered a lackluster 35 check-ins. The Austin Convention Center had the highest number of check-ins at 4,634, but that also included 2009 numbers. So let’s say 75 percent of those were in 2010. With a base of 18,000 attendees, that’s a participation rate of just 19 percent. Gowalla didn’t fare much better (sorry, Jan), with 2,634 check-ins at the Convention Center — about 15 percent of total attendees.

And Twitter? Well, using Wunderman’s Listening Platform to sift through the retweets and mentions from nonattendees, we estimated that just over 5,000 unique individuals were actively tweeting from the event. Not bad at about one in four attendees, but definitely falls quite shy of “everybody.”

What’s the takeaway?

Even among the early adopters, usage of geosocial clearly hasn’t yet caught up to the hype.

But the real story that’s still writing itself is how eerily similar all of these services have become. Let’s see: You can post tweets simultaneously to Facebook and Twitter. Gowalla lets you tag your check-ins with comments and photos, not unlike Twitpic. Twitter is now rolling out geo-tracking, bearing an uncanny resemblance to foursquare and Gowalla. And there are rumors that Facebook is getting into the game by integrating with Gowalla and foursquare.

Who’s going to win?

My money is on Facebook as this year’s gorilla in geosocial. Its user base dwarfs that of every other social networking service. In fact, it’s recently eclipsed Google as the most visited site on the web. It already serves as the default cc: for many who are broadcasting Twitter updates, check-ins and mobile photo uploads via other services. A partnership with Gowalla and foursquare will place Facebook squarely in the sweet spot of geo-based social networking — without the fuss of building its own technology.

If you haven’t done so already, take a closer look at geosocial marketing. Once Facebook gets into the mix, it’ll explode. Guaranteed. Anywhere your company has a physical presence — retail locations, local events, industry conferences, etc. — is a great place to test the waters.

Recently my company tested foursquare and Twitter for a consumer product client’s local events. It’s been consistently seeing participation rates of around 10 percent or higher. Certainly not “everybody,” but definitely a respectable showing for a mass-market play.

Time to get on it. Perhaps you can be the one to say, “We knew about geosocial when … ”

Melissa Campanelli’s The View From Here: Business Schools Offering Social Media Courses

To meet the demand from companies for skills around social media strategies, tony business schools — including Harvard Business School; London Business School; Insead, the international business school based in Fontainebleau, France; and the École des Hautes Études Commerciales, known as H.E.C., in Paris — are incorporating courses on social media into their M.B.A. curriculums. Social media strategy courses, according to the article, “aim to build on existing skills to teach an understanding of social media, of how to build marketing strategies within social networks and of how to track their effectiveness.”

I read a March 30 New York Times article that said that many national and international business schools are incorporating social media strategy courses into their curriculums.

Take that, all of you social media marketing naysayers!

To meet the demand from companies for skills around social media strategies, tony business schools — including Harvard Business School; London Business School; Insead, the international business school based in Fontainebleau, France; and the École des Hautes Études Commerciales, known as HEC, in Paris — are incorporating courses on social media into their M.B.A. curriculums.

Social media strategy courses, according to the article, “aim to build on existing skills to teach an understanding of social media, of how to build marketing strategies within social networks and of how to track their effectiveness.”

While most of the students entering these programs may be adept at using social networking tools in their personal lives, that’s not enough, says the article. Companies want executives that “can transfer this experience into the commercial world.”

Textbooks aren’t required in many of the courses; instead, students are asked to follow industry-specific blogs to keep up with developments. They’re instructed to communicate with people involved in the social media industry, listening to the issues they deal with on a strategic level.

Schools are teaching social media marketing in a variety of ways. In an upcoming course at Insead, students will work on a project for the luxury brand Hermès, generating detailed social media marketing strategy ideas for the brand. A course at London Business School required students to participate in the 2009 Google Online Marketing Challenge, where teams were given $200 of free online advertising with Google AdWords to work with companies to devise effective online marketing campaigns. Meanwhile at Harvard Business School, a second-year elective course on “competing with social networks” is being offered as part of that school’s M.B.A. program.

The article made the argument that the high level of engagement of top digital media professionals with these courses has reciprocal benefits. Students get to learn from the skills and experience of the executives, while the companies get to make contact with potential future hires with the skills needed to exploit social media channels for commercial gain.

Sounds like a win-win to me. But what do you think? Do you think social media strategy or social networking skills can be taught, or can they only be mastered by folks after they’ve gotten their hands dirty with them?

And should elite business schools — elite, expensive business schools, that is — bother with social media strategy or social networking courses? Should they be instead focusing on more lofty subjects?

Let me know by posting a comment below!

Michael Della Penna’s Conversations: How to Spark a Conversation Revolution!

Creating conversations is hard, despite all the knowledge and tools at our disposal today. it should be easier than ever, right? Not quite. As is all too often the case, fear can get in the way. More specifically, fear of the social media unknown.

Creating conversations is hard, despite all the knowledge and tools at our disposal today. It should be easier than ever, right? Not quite. As is all too often the case, fear can get in the way. More specifically, fear of the social media unknown.

For many marketers, that includes the biggest “what if” of all: What if someone talks badly about your brand? The simple fact is consumers are already talking. Therefore, learning how to spark and manage conversations isn’t only essential on today’s social internet, but it might just save your job or, better yet, get you promoted.

To do it right, marketers must abandon their comfort zone of hiding behind their marketing efforts, including crafting and delivering messages, measuring sales, and then hitting the rinse and repeat button. Instead, they must be open, transparent, adventurous and unafraid. So what’s the formula for sparking and facilitating a great conversation? Here are a few suggestions.

1. Focus on relationships, not technologies. Take the time to understand what your customers want and do online, then determine the kind of relationship you want to have with them.

2. Start with a clear and simple goal. Is your goal about improving customer service (like @comcastcares) or sharing a passion for a topic or issue (e.g., sports, fashion or music)? Have a specific goal in mind at the beginning and add to it over time as you learn.

3. Monitor and survey. Use social monitoring tools to understand what kinds of conversations are already taking place. Investigate your customers’ interests. You may find vastly different interests and engagement levels across certain demographics and customer segments — this often gives you some direction on where to start and who to target first.

4. Start small and experiment.
Most of us have limited resources, so start small. Go narrow, but deep. Then take some chances and do something unique to create value. For example, one of my clients hired a photographer to take exclusive photos at sporting events in order to share those photos with its fans and followers. Needless to say, it generated huge interest and continues to spark conversations around the communities’ shared passion for sports.

5. Try focusing on an industry development or event rather than your product or brand. Leverage big events and share your unique perspective. People will likely jump in as you build trust and establish credibility.

6. Feed the conversation with integrated marketing efforts.
Don’t forget to support your community efforts by using existing tools and resources. Socialize traditional channels such as email to grow awareness, interest and engagement.

7. Don’t forget the “social” in social media. Listen and respond quickly; be conversational, authentic and transparent. Recognize and support contributors by sharing their content with others and thanking them.

8. Measure everything.
What kinds of communications are resonating? Measure each effort’s impact against your objective. Look at quantitative and qualitative metrics. For @comcastcares, that might mean looking at how much customer service has improved and how it’s impacted the perceptions of consumers and the media.

9. Be flexible and willing to change direction. Go with the flow. If an approach isn’t resonating, try something new. Let your customers guide the conversation. In fact, the most successful communities are the ones in which the hosting brands eventually get to a place where they post the least. Over time these brands have been able to earn the trust of the community. They simply spark and facilitate the conversation rather than dominate it. Remember, trust = money.

10. Stick to it. Engaging visitors and customers in conversation doesn’t happen overnight. Stick to it. With a little practice and patience — and lots of listening and flexibility — you’ll find your way.

Building successful conversations is really about listening, relinquishing control and being willing to fail. While this is new thinking for many marketers, it can and is being done well among brands that focus on their relationships, not campaigns.

Finally, success also requires practice. This was best said in Malcolm Gladwell’s “Outliers”: “Practice isn’t something you do until you’re good. It is something that makes you good.”

‘Til next time.

Melissa Campanelli’s The View From Here: A Social Media Sweepstakes Platform, From a Traditional Direct Marketer

Perhaps one of the most recognizable names in the traditional direct marketing arena — Publishers Clearing House — is partnering with social media marketing tools provider Wildfire Interactive on a cool platform that enables companies to launch, administer and fulfill social media sweepstakes.

Perhaps one of the most recognizable names in the traditional direct marketing arena — Publishers Clearing House — is partnering with social media marketing tools provider Wildfire Interactive on a cool platform that enables companies to launch, administer and fulfill social media sweepstakes.

To me, it’s another example of traditional and social marketing worlds colliding.

Wildfire Promotion Builder, according to a press release that appeared in my inbox this week, is a “scalable and self-service social media marketing platform that makes it easy for companies and agencies to build online sweepstakes and simultaneously publish them on Facebook fan pages, Twitter and company websites, which are automatically integrated with Facebook Connect.”

Promotion Builder has also been integrated into PCH Boost, an application programming interface that automates the legal and fulfillment aspects of running sweepstakes — also known as the unsexy stuff. With PCH Boost, according to the release, “companies can easily offer their customers winnings of up to $100,000 without having to deal with the administration, high costs, legal issues and logistics associated with managing sweepstakes and awarding prize money.”

I think this will be a great and useful tool for online marketers who want to launch sweepstakes programs — which have had a rebirth of sorts thanks to social media — with the expertise of a traditional direct marketer.

Young Affluents Love to Go Social Shopping

Many young affluents are using a social networking niche — social shopping sites — at least according to a new report from Unity Marketing.

Many young affluents are using a social networking niche — social shopping sites — at least according to a new report from Unity Marketing.

What are social shopping sites? They’re sites like Woot.com, Gilt.com, HauteLook and Rue La La that offer “in-the-know-shoppers” deals on cool merchandise. Woot.com, for example, has one product for sale daily until it’s sold out or the clock strikes 11:59 p.m. CST, when it’s replaced by the next day’s item.

Rue La La, on the other hand, is an invitation-only social shopping site, which means you have to be invited by an existing member to enjoy its benefits. Exclusivity adds to the interest factor in this site. It also features premium designer clothes and accessories in private-sale boutiques that are only open for a limited time.

The report, How the Affluent Luxury Consumer Uses the Internet and Social Media: An In-Depth Profile, found that one in three affluents surveyed have visited a social shopping site in the past three months. Social shopping sites are most popular among young affluent consumers under the age of 45. In fact, 43 percent of these young affluents use social shopping sites versus 33 percent of affluents as a whole, the report found. What’s more, affluent consumers’ use of social shopping rose from only 3 percent in 2007 to a whopping 33 percent this year.

“Social shopping sites are going to continue to grow in popularity among the affluent market, especially among young affluents,” said Pam Danzinger, president of Unity Marketing, in a press release about the report. “They offer young affluents shopping experiences they enjoy: quick action, limited access and value pricing. For luxury marketers targeting young affluents, these are the places to be.”

For the study, 1,614 affluent consumers with incomes of $100,000 or more and who bought luxury goods or services in the fourth quarter were surveyed from Jan. 8 to Jan. 27. The average age of respondents was 45.9, and the average household income was $239,300.

Almost 20 percent of those surveyed were classified as “ultra-affluents,” or those at the top 2 percent of U.S. households with incomes of $250,000. Virtually all respondents use the internet for personal uses, including shopping, and nearly 80 percent are social media users.

So if you target affluents (and who doesn’t?), examine the sales models of these sites to see if you can emulate anything like them on your site. Can you offer your customers or subscribers a “special, one-day only” promotion or the like? Or try selling a different, cool or unusual item each day? I bet this approach will keep your customers coming back to your site each day. I mean, everyone wants to be “in-the-know,” right?

Have you ever tried social shopping techniques? Have they worked? Do tell by leaving a comment here or sending a message to me at mcampanelli@napco.com.