WWTT? Yeti+ Launches for Earth Day, Offers Unique ‘Streaming’ Content

This past Wednesday was the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Despite dealing with a pandemic and quarantines, a number of brands put out campaigns to celebrate the environment, including Yeti’s launch of Yeti+.

This past Wednesday, April 22, was the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Despite dealing with a pandemic and quarantines, a number of brands put out campaigns to celebrate the environment, but the Earth Day campaign that caught my eye the most was from Yeti.

The Austin-based brand, known for its outdoor lifestyle products, created Yeti+, along the same vein as Apple+ or Disney+. But unlike those streaming video subscriptions, Yeti+ is free (though available for only a limited time), and has some pretty great content to watch, especially during these super stressful times.

Yeti offers Yeti+ streaming service to celebrate Earth Day
Credit: Yeti

What sort of goodies can you watch? Some fun nature documentaries? Action-packed outdoor events? Nope. You can watch streams be streamed.

The site copy reads:

We’ll be back outside before we know it. Until then, kick back, grab a cold one, and wet your appetite for the wild with one of our streams.

Click on any of the options, the video goes full screen, and you’re treated to the calming serenity of simply watching a stream — literally a body of water (each one runs about 10 minutes). If you’ve ever been to a holiday party where someone puts on a festive Yule Log video, then you get the picture.

But where the holiday Yule Log videos are often more about kitschy ambiance, I think the video offerings of Yeti+ are not only clever, but honestly, good relevant content.

They’re soothing. They’re beautiful. They take us out of our homes and transport us to a place of calm. Maybe to a place we’ve never been before. And though many of us may still be able to go outside and exercise while maintaining our stay at home rules, not everyone lives someplace this beautiful, green, and lush. Or is even physically able to go outside at all, for whatever reason.

Yeti+’s website copy may be a little tongue-in-cheek, but I think their Earth Day campaign offers a much-needed escape from the harshness of this world. And in my opinion, every little bit helps. We talk about how important it is to offer value to our customers and prospects. Well, I think Yeti+ nailed it.

What do you think, marketers? Leave me a comment below!

Streaming Video Will Beat Addressable TV to the Punch

For years we’ve been hearing about addressable television, the ability to target TV ads to individual viewers much like you would online ads with targeting, and potentially even retargeting. But in my opinion, addressable TV is at least 3 years too late.

For years we’ve been hearing about addressable television, which is the ability to target TV ads to individual viewers much like you would online ads with targeting, and potentially even retargeting. In fact, eMarketer just released a report predicting that the addressable TV market will grow from $1.26 billion this year to $2.25 billion next year and $3.04 billion in 2019!

Those numbers sound amazing. But they’re not. In fact, even at $3 billion, addressable TV will only represent 4 percent of all TV ad spend, and the rate of increase is clearly declining.

eMarketer US Addressable TV Ad Spending, 2015-2019In my opinion, addressable TV is at least 3 years too late.

In the time broadcast television has taken to catch up with online advertising, not only has online advertising lapped it repeatedly in most forms of effectiveness (save only brand impression), online streaming services are stealing TV’s entertainment thunder, too. Streaming services from YouTube to Neflix and Hulu now attract not only top talent, but prime time viewership and awards. And with more competition on the way in Facebook Watch and Disney streaming (to name just two of many), television could well be staring down the barrel of an Adpocalypse. (For more on that, see our video from Monday.)

With all of these online video sites coming up, addressable TV looks less like the wave of the future and more like the whimper of a declining ad channel. Will TV ever catch up to the targeting capability of online advertising? And even if it did, will it ever catch up to the interactivity and ability to launch a direct conversion?

Even though Adobe added TV ad management and addressability to its marketing cloud, that feels more like the exception than the rule. Like tacking an analog tail onto the digital donkey.

What seems more likely to be the state of things in 10 years? That TV adopts the capabilities of digital, or that smart TVs and other home devices based on streaming displace traditional TV in living rooms?

Well, I still have TV with cable, but a quick survey of office Millennials shows what their choice is, and it ain’t the triple-play. Younger folks aren’t just cutting cords, they’re wondering why the hell anyone had cords in the first place.

In fact, the package deal is exactly what’s wrong with TV for viewers and advertisers alike. It’s 2017, you can watch exactly the media you want on dozens on online channels, and yet on cable you can only get content by channels packaged with dozens of other channels you probably don’t want.

It’s the same with your advertising. The people you want, packaged with thousands you don’t.

This is following the same script online transformation has in a dozen other industries. Taxis couldn’t give people what they wanted, so we got Uber. Stores couldn’t give people what they wanted, so we got Amazon.

Give people what they want, or the Internet will swallow your industry whole.

And for TV, it’s way too late to try to get addressable now.

Facebook Live Growing Up Fast

I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that most of you reading this have not thought seriously about Facebook Live yet. Live is the real-time video streaming service it rolled out just a few months ago, but it’s already been used to cover both U.S. presidential nomination conventions, document shootings, and try on the Chewbacca mask watched around the world. And now, it’s getting ads.

Facebook Live EverywhereI’m going to go out on a limb and guess that most of you reading this have not thought seriously about Facebook Live yet.

Live is the real-time video streaming service it rolled out just a few months ago (January 2016), but it’s already been used to cover both U.S. presidential nomination conventions, document shootings, and try on the Chewbacca mask watched around the world.

Next week, Live will probably stream quite a lot of Olympic coverage straight from Rio, perhaps outside of scheduled broadcast hours.

Facebook Live Gets Commercial Breaks

It came out this week via Ad Age that Facebook is testing ads in Facebook Live. The stream hasn’t had those yet. In fact, thus far Facebook has been spending money to get top media partners to use the platform without taking steps to monetize it. (Which may be why we’ve seen some of the Facebook Live coverage moments mentioned above, but certainly not all of them.) Live ads can only be a higher priority now that Newsfeed ads are close to selling out (which Heather Fletcher reported on earlier this week).

These ads are in the hands of the media partners. Live video creators can insert the ads any time after five minutes into the Live stream, and they split the revenue with Facebook.

According to Ad Age, the Live test ads are 15-second commercial breaks during the live stream, what you could call mid-roll ads. They can’t appear earlier than five minutes into the Live stream.

Timing Matters Again

So how does this matter to you? I’m not going to say everyone has to go out and start making Facebook Live broadcasts. You might want to consider it for product demos where you want to include more interactivity, or for marketing events you’d like to show to a wider audience, but it is still pretty unproven as a content marketing channel.

Where I think Facebook Live does deserve more attention is as a live advertising channel. And that’s something digital hasn’t really had much of.

TV and radio advertising are tied to event timing. The Super Bowl only happens during four hours a year, after all.

The whole Facebook Live product takes what Periscope and Meerkat were doing and makes them bigger. Facebook is still one of the largest networks on the Web, and Facebook Live events broadcast by major media partners with millions of their own followers have the potential to be something like broadcast TV in the digital environment.

So I would watch very carefully what’s going on with Facebook Live, because it’s one big event away from becoming the new must-watch TV.

Target Marketing Live

And, if you want to see how a Facebook Live broadcast looks, check out our Facebook page today at 2 PM EST, when Target Marketing is going Live! Watch us pitch our best videos ideas complete with healthy bickering, sassy opinions and a movie quote (or 5). See you then!