Effective Sales Emails Don’t Use These Techniques in 2018

Trying to start conversations with potential clients using cold email or LinkedIn Inmail? Most sellers are. But are you sabotaging yourself by sending prospects the following?

Mobile emailTrying to start conversations with potential clients using cold sales emails or LinkedIn Inmail? Most sellers are. But are you sabotaging yourself by sending prospects:

  • a template you found while Googling?
  • a subject line starting with RE:?
  • messages with words like hope, love & “looking forward to” in them?
  • follow-ups using words like “bubble up” or “fall through the cracks”?
  • phony complements, automated or artificial intelligence-driven messages?
  • messages starting with questions biased to answers you’re looking for?
  • PDF attachments or videos?

Any of these look familiar? Most of these tactics are failing sellers… or will fail you soon. Simply because they’re not creative.

They lack originality. These tactics scream lazy, un-researched, marketing-style spam.

“Don’t turn your sales reps into mini marketers, please. Sales is context. Sales has to put context around the content,” says sales trainer John Barrows.

“If you’re not you’re no different than marketing … your template email is crap.”

Use phrases like, “Would you like to know more or do you have any questions for us?” at end of your messages.

Tricky or Burnt-out Subject Lines

Cute, tricky or over-used subject lines are the leading cause of sales email failure. Your subject line will fail to provoke curiosity (get opened) if you:

  • try to dupe your reader into opening like: “RE: Did you see this?”
  • use more than five words
  • specify what is inside your email
  • use an obvious subject line that pops into your head

Some of my students do have success tricking clients into opening. I discourage it. Dishonesty is never worthwhile — even if it works near-term.

For example, one student selling trade show services to marketers uses “the artwork” in his cold email subject line… to dupe customers into thinking his message is project-related. It gets him opened. But for how long and at what long-term cost to his (and his company’s) reputation?

Sellers with the strongest email open rates are using 2-3 words maximum. This exploits the nature of a cold email subject line: It should be provocative and vague.

Beware of words that telegraph what you want to talk about with your prospect. Don’t let on to the message inside the email. If you do it will most likely be deleted or put-off until later (a.k.a. never).

Never, ever, ever use an email subject line that just popped into your head. Any idea how many other people like you are doing this? The result is dozens of inbound emails coming at your prospects—most being spammy and looking precisely the same.

Subject lines get burnt-out fast. So fast!

Using weak subject lines trains customers to delete your message.

All the Wrong Words

Are you writing introductions like this?

“Hi Jeff,

Out of respect for your time, I thought an email might be less disruptive than an unannounced phone call. I was hoping to offer you qualified leads for your sales team to close.”

Or this?

“Hi, Jeff,

I’m a co-founder at XYZ Company. We’re a startup developing a new technology to debug large scale production environments …”

Or this?

“I wanted to find out if you have any design needs at ____ [insert target company]. We can increase sales, engagement, conversions and more through our design strategies. Interested? Email me back. I’d love to chat.”

As a sales coach I see these lazy, failing email messages by the dozens each week.

Here’s the problem: Templates you’ve found on Google. Guess what … everyone has Google. Billions of people. Most sellers are too lazy to get creative. Hence, they use email templates others (falsely) claim work.

Are Email Autoresponders Becoming Too Aggressive?

When is the line crossed between email subject lines — usually in a series of autoresponders — that provoke curiosity and prompt engagement, versus those that become aggressive and look like the sender has descended into desperation?

We all get a lot of email. Often, it’s a mystery how one gets on a list. But I suspect that over time, we all get accustomed to the daily barrage of email that we didn’t sign up for. Or if we did sign on, it may have been months (or longer) ago and have no recollection of having done so.

But, I’ve noticed a trend in recent months about email subject lines: they seem to be getting more desperate and aggressive.

Perhaps these aggressive subject line approaches have been tested and are proven to work, but they were enough to prompt me unsubscribe (without even reading the email).

A few months ago, I shared my “5 Copywriting Tips to Reduce Email Unsubscribes.” Looking at the popularity of this blog post, it’s clear that reducing unsubscribes is a hot topic. So I have to wonder if these aggressive subject lines have been tested, and unsubscribe rates monitored.

In another post, “Are Autoresponders Killing Email Marketing?,” recounted my experience of making an inquiry for a direct mail list from an automated website. I didn’t order that day, but suggested to a client that they place an order. Thankfully, they didn’t.

The next day, less than a full 24 hours after I didn’t purchase, they presented me an offer of 15 percent off my order. That seemed smart until I realized that had I ordered the day before, I would have paid full price. I would never have known because no doubt the marketing automation software would have placed me in a totally different sequence of autoresponder follow-up messages. I lost trust in that direct mail list company because while well intended, the aggressiveness of making the sale overshadowed what would have been right for the customer.

There were two comments from readers of that blog about autoresponders worth sharing:

“The balance between follow up, pestering, and offer management … strikes at the heart of the matter. The fact is that marketing automation is pulling marketers into sales roles for the first time and without deep personal engagement to guide the level of aggressiveness. The point at which sales and marketing intersect has always created friction. Marketing automation can amplify good or bad decisions for content at what is really at the top of the sales funnel, bottom of the marketing funnel.”

This reader made a great point: perhaps people who are not trained as email copywriters, and who don’t know what they’re doing, are writing these aggressive subject lines. Do they test these subject lines to know what works? Or monitor unsubscribes? Maybe aggressiveness is a business decision no matter the outcome. Or aggressive subject lines are a new normal.

Then, there was this comment:

“If your email strategy and creative is cr*p, marketing automation simply empowers you to send more cr*p, more quickly. Technology is not the problem. Bad strategy and creative is the problem.”

I’d say that comment pretty much sums it up.

Gary Hennerberg’s latest book is “Crack the Customer Mind Code: Seven Pathways from Head to Heart to YES!” is available on Amazon. For a free download with more detail about the seven pathways and other copywriting and consulting tips, go to Hennerberg.com.

3 Simple Ideas for Holiday Email

There are tons of great tactics, tips and tricks that pop up in the holiday email inbox, whether they’re just clever subject lines, headlines or designs. Here are just three of them.

So, who else is tired of the holiday shopping season by now?

Just kidding … I actually don’t mind it very much. The rush to get things done. The pause to reflect on the year that’s coming to an end.

And then there’s all that holiday email clogging up our inboxes.

The other day, I waded through a lot of the email we collect at Who’s Mailing What! I’ve been paying attention as more and more of it has been rolling in. But this is my first deep dive into considering some of the creative ideas used by marketers to drive online and brick-and-mortar sales.

There are tons of great tactics, tips, and tricks that pop up at this time of the year, whether they’re clever subject lines, headlines, or designs. Here are just three of them.

1. Count Down The Numbers
amazon12Numbers are important for more than discounts. You have to convey urgency to customers. They need to know how many shopping days remain to guarantee delivery before Christmas, among other deadlines. But the most popular number I’ve seen used is “twelve,” as in the carol, “The Twelve Days of Christmas.” This year, a lot of drip campaigns have deployed around that theme.

Some examples:

  • “12 Days of Deals”-Amazon
  • “12 Days of Saving Begins Now.”-4Sleep
  • “12 Deals of December”-Maryland Square

2. Make Cultural References
hebfalaOnce Black Friday comes around, the rich traditions so many of us know return. Stories, songs, even decorations, when called to mind, can really stand out.

Some examples:

  • “Fa-la-la-la flash deals”-H-E-B
  • “Don’t Be A Grinch! We Know You Can’t Resist This.”-Rebel Circus
  •  “Don’t go full ugly Christmas sweater.”-Diamond Nexus

3. Evoke the Spirit of the Season
marmotwarmthFrom Thanksgiving through to New Year’s Day, the season is about lots of things. Besides religious celebrations, it’s about spending time with friends and family.

You don’t have to get overly sentimental or sappy to get people to think about caring for their loved ones, serving others, or just feeling the warmth as winter draws near.

Some examples:

  • “Give warmth”-Marmot
  • “Jackets to keep you cozy and chic”-Wantable
  •  “Hanes and The Salvation Army are teaming up to help the homeless”-Hanes

Anyway, this is only a small sampling of the vast holiday and Christmas emails that have dropped in the last month or so. I’d love to hear about good holiday campaigns you’ve noticed. Please share in the comments below.

In the meantime, have a happy and safe holiday season, and may you find renewed inspiration in 2017.

The Big Problem With Sales Email Templates  

Spending time doing cold email outreach to new prospects? Trying to reignite smoldering discussions with existing customers? Then you’re probably using voicemail (the phone), LinkedIn’s InMail and email. Sales email templates are a big part of day-to-day life. The problem is they don’t work.

Nothing screams “impersonal” more than a templated email. Yet most sellers use templates.

EmailSpending time doing cold email outreach to new prospects? Trying to reignite smoldering discussions with existing customers? Then you’re probably using voicemail (the phone), LinkedIn’s InMail and email. Sales email templates are a big part of day-to-day life. The problem is they don’t work.

Nothing screams “impersonal” more than a templated email. Yet most sellers use templates.

Stop Using Templates, Now

Templates don’t work. Now, I know you know this. But you still use ’em. So allow me to issue you permission to stop. Right now — today.

Think about the last templated message you received. How quickly did you delete it? More importantly, how easy was it for you to spot?

Was it the subject line — the one that told you precisely what was inside the message? (A.K.A. a terrible pitch.)

Or did the subject line trick you into opening it — only to earn your immediate deletion because the first line was offensive?

After years of helping folks write sales email letters, I can tell you why this happens. The reason sales email templates rarely work is simple: Most use the same, “telling” communications format.

Are Your Emails Asking Questions?

One common reason potential buyers delete cold email templates is because they start with a question that causes them to roll their eyes: the kind that signals “terrible pitch ahead.” Most sales email templates rely on a lazy, transparent formula. They sabotage you.

Providing that these kinds of emails do get opened, the contents usually:

  • Ask a question known to be on the buyers’ mind.
  • Take longer than 30 seconds to read.
  • Present a solution, rather than provoking the buyer to hit reply and talk about their problem.

These are just a few characteristics. There are a half-dozen more. Today, I want to focus on the root cause of your cold email being deleted:

That silly question you are asking.

The one you are asking to try to appear relevant. Trouble is it’s a dead give-away. It’s lazy, and off the same cookie sheet as 95 percent of competitor emails pouring into your buyers’ inbox.

For example, one of my students was using, “Did you know that printing is typically the third highest office expense behind payroll and rent?” He sells managed print services to CEOs, COOs and IT managers at small and mid-sized businesses.

Opening with a question is always dangerous. If it is perceived as a “leading question”, you’re deleted. Because if your question feels like a setup to a sales pitch the message will fail to provoke response.

The prospect will think, “I know why you’re asking … ” — then roll his eyes and hit delete. You will have signaled the “sales pitch ahead” alarm, sabotaging your provocation.

If the only obvious answer to your question is “yes” or “no”, it may risk insulting the buyers’ intelligence.

“Did you know printing is expensive?” is an obvious yes.

This approach is risky as compared to a question that forces the buyer to introspect on a more complicated issue.

Creative Cage Match: Greetabl vs. Old Navy

According to Radicati Group’s “Email Statistics Report, 2015-2019,” the consumer inbox got hit with approximately 93 emails a day in 2015. That’s a lot of email, which means marketers have to nail the subject line in order to win the open, then deliver on the open.

There’s a reason that pro-wrestling is so popular — and it’s not just the juicy drama and bespangled costumes. People love a good fight, and have for millennia, dating back to the gladiators of Rome and beyond.

So, once a month I’m going to select two marketers and toss them into a Creative Cage Match. I’ll be looking at everything ranging from email to direct mail, website to mobile site. It’ll be a mix of objective and subjective, and each time a marketer will walk out of the ring triumphantly.

According to Radicati Group’s “Email Statistics Report, 2015-2019” (opens as a PDF), the consumer inbox got hit with approximately 93 emails a day in 2015. That’s a lot of email, which means marketers have to nail the subject line in order to win the open, then deliver on the open.

You had my curiosity, but now you have my attentionOn this side of the ring, we have Greetabl, launched in 2013 as a creative attempt to bridge the “Gifting Gap.” Consumers are able to select from curated small gift options, choose and customize packaging, all with a few clicks. Why send a $60 bouquet of wilted roses when you can earn mega brownie points for something outside of the norm (while also keeping your wallet from crying)?

Across the ring is the retail powerhouse Old Navy — from the same family that gives us The Gap and Banana Republic — known for its clothing and accessories. Founded in 1994, Old Navy has brick and mortar stores, as well as an e-commerce site, and is known for quirky commercials featuring celebrities such as Amy Poehler and Amy Schumer.

Email vs. Email

With a jam-packed inbox, you have to nail the subject line, then follow through with the content by way of copy and design. So let’s look at two that I received recently:

Greetabl email“You know she needs this” is the subject line from Greetabl. This definitely grabbed my attention, and I’m pleased with what I clicked through to. I enjoyed the preheader — Overworked friends need extra <3 — and while it doesn’t give me a benefit, it made me smile.

The email is about a new Greetabl gift you can send a friend. The image is great, the copy is simple, to the point and in Greetabl’s voice, and at the very bottom I really like the Unsubscribe copy:

If you really, really don’t want to hear from us anymore, you can unsubscribe. We totally won’t take it personal. I mean, it’s just an email, right? It definitely does not mean we’re not still friends. Right?? Are we overthinking this? Love you, mean it.

Two thumbs up Greetabl … which reminds me … I have a bestie’s birthday coming up soon …

Now, on to the behemoth that is Old Navy.

Championship-Winning Email Creative

Last week, in my best attempt to be timely and sporty, we saw the Email Creative Final Four play out in a blaze of March Madness-like glory. Herb Brooks united his squad against the heavily favored Soviet team, and as the U.S. squad tried to overcome insurmountable odds and win … oh wait. That’s the plot to the 2004 hockey drama, “Miracle.” Ahem. Sports.

Last week, in my best attempt to be timely and sporty, we saw the Email Creative Final Four play out in a blaze of March Madness-like glory. Herb Brooks united his squad against the heavily favored Soviet team, and as the U.S. squad tried to overcome insurmountable odds and win … oh wait. That’s the plot to the 2004 hockey drama, “Miracle,” starring Kurt Russell. Ahem. Sports.

So, with last week delivering Birchbox and Lindy Bop into the final arena for the championship match, let’s review our bracket:

Final Email Creative March Madness bracket

In the Final Four, both Birchbox and Lindy Box cleaned house against their opponents, earning 11 and 9 points respectively.

And as a quick reminder, there are five areas to score points, and scores are as follows:

  • 0 points: Dude you missed!
  • 2 points: Nice shot!
  • 3 points: You’re totally going pro!

Championship Game: Personal Beauty Products vs. Retro Apparel
Birchbox is a strong player in the inbox, sending messages that range from subscriber news — box customizations, box shipments, product review reminders — to promotional emails. I personally receive emails almost every other day, if not daily.
Birchbox email for Email Creative March Madness ChampionshipThis email was sent March 28 with the subject line, “Shop Your Samples, Get Perks,” which is simple but effective, especially in the eyes of a Birchbox subscriber.

The preheader echos the subject line, reading, “Stock up on your favorite samples today.” Okay, maybe this could have been a little more creative, but at least the preheader is in use.

As usual with most Birchbox communications, the design and copy are bold and to the point. “Tried it and loved it?” the email asks. Well now subscribers can get free shipping on any full-size product they’ve previously sampled.

And to make things relevant (and personalized), the email shows me six of my most recent samples, as well as the call-to-action button “Shop Your Samples.”

Could Birchbox have made it any easier? Doubtful.

Birchbox’s Points
Subject line: 2
Preheader text: 2
Copy: 2
Call to action: 2
Overall design: 3
Total: 11 points

Email Creative March Madness: Final Four

By now, you’re familiar with my Creative Cage Match posts, in which I throw two emails into the cage and one comes out a winner. Today, I’m going to mix up my sports metaphors to bring you: Email Creative March Madness.

By now, you’re familiar with my Creative Cage Match posts, in which I throw two emails into the cage and one comes out a winner. Today, I’m going to mix up my sports metaphors to bring you Email Creative March Madness.

March Madness Email Creative FInal Four competitorsSince launching Sass Marketing, I have hosted four Creative Cage Matches, which makes for a perfect mini-bracket. The winners from those four matches — the Final Four — are competing today head-on with NEW creative in two separate games. Then next Tuesday I’ll host the Email Creative March Madness National Championship.

There are five areas to score points, and scores are as follows:

  • 0 points: Dude you missed!
  • 2 points: Nice shot!
  • 3 points: You’re totally going pro!

Game 1: Food vs. Makeup
GrubHub was the winner of the first Creative Cage Match. Hailed as the “nation’s leading online and mobile food ordering company,” GrubHub’s original CCM performance impressed me with it’s multi-part drip campaign, sassy copy, entertaining design, and well-written subject lines and preheader text.

Gruhub St. Patrick's Day Creative Cage Match: March Madness EditionThis email, sent March 13, starts with the subject line: “Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with Grubhub.” It’s to the point … and not much else. Surprisingly, despite preheaders of the past, this email skips it altogether. The St. Patrick’s day icons are whimsical and eye-catching, while keeping things from being too busy.

Possibly the best part of the email is that Grubhub identified a handful of restaurants near my apartment, and gave me a brief overview, including: restaurant name, cuisine, delivery charge, minimum order and address. Following each is a “View Menu” call-to-action button, as well as a photo of a menu item. I appreciate the quick “snapshot” that lets me make my ordering decision that much easier.

Grubhub’s Points
Subject line: 0
Preheader text: 0
Copy: 2
Call to action: 2
Overall design: 2
Total: 6 points

Up against Gruhub is Birchbox, the most recent Creative Cage Match winner who swept with its solid content marketing via email. This beauty subscription box loved by millions kept things simple and straightforward with its original winning email, letting the tutorial video do all the talking.

Birchbox April Box Preview Creative Cage Match: March Madness EditionI received this email on March 16, with the subject line: “Sneak Preview! Your April Box Options?” (Trust me, the hibiscus emoji wasn’t as huge as it’s displaying here).

As a Birchbox subscriber, this is exactly the kind of subject line I look for every month. The inclusion of the emoji was cute, and also a nice way to make the email stand out in a sea of black text (especially since it’s a brightly colored flower).

The preheader text echoes the subject line, but is personalized with my name: “Melissa, we’re revealing the customization options for your April Box.” It’s also a clickable link, taking you to the Web page that includes the monthly reveal video. The email design borrows a border from the Rifle Paper Co. Botanical Notebook + Notepad Set —  an April featured item — and includes a image of Lorelei and Rachel, two Birchbox ladies who subscribers are very used to seeing in our inboxes.

Birchbox’s copy, as usual, gets to the point, supporting the “Reveal My Choices” call-to-action button. I mean, seriously … who’s going to pass up clicking through and finding out more info?!

Birchbox’s Points
Subject line: 2
Preheader text: 3
Copy: 2
Call to action: 2
Overall design: 2
Total: 11 points

Gruhub vs. Birchbox Final Score: 6 to 11

Oh wow … we have a clear winner in Game 1, with Birchbox wiping up the court with Grubhub. It was the subject line and preheader that provided the clear advantage in this situation.

‘If You’re Having Trouble Viewing this Email …’

How many times have you read this in your email preview window? “Too many times” is the only right answer. The preheader text seems to be the most under-utilized email tool — and, yet, one one of the most important.

How many times have you read this in your email preview window? “Too many times” is the only right answer.

The preheader text seems to be the most under-utilized email tool — and, yet, one of the most important. Sometimes called a snippet, Johnson box, or preview message, the preheader appears in the preview pane or screen of all email applications.

Preview Pane labeledMany marketers often do not use a preheader — an email’s most valuable piece of real estate. We’ve all read this in our email applications — “If you’re having trouble viewing this email …” As the example shows below, the preview pane shows the first text it sees in the email. In this case, notice “Trouble viewing this email? View it online.” Sadly, this text gives a reader no idea of what this email is about.

Bad preheader from PaperSpecsYou’ve only got a few seconds to interest a reader enough to open your email. Use the combination of your subject line and preheader to encourage a reader to open your email.

2 Ways to Implement Preheader Text

Mission BBQ visible preheaderVisible Preheader: The easiest and simplest way is to place a block at the top of your email that you fill with text. This can be a block in the HTML that appears before any other text in the email. In the example above, the text appears at the top left hand corner with the “difficulty reading this email” section in the upper right hand side.

Hidden Preheader text from ThreadlessHidden Preheader: Some designs might not work with a visible preheader block. In this case, you’ll need to code using inline styles. If you’d like to do this, you can find the code here: Email on Acid.

Make Preheader Text Work Harder for You
Preheaders can enhance your subject lines in a number of ways. In the same way you test your subject lines, you should also test your preheader text. Here are some ways you can think about your preheader text for testing:

  • Subject Line Extension: Make your preheader an extension of your subject line. This will extend the amount of space you have to convince your reader to open your email.
  • Incentive/Offer Text: Use the preheader text to define your offer or discount.
  • Personalization: Try just personalizing your preheader; it’ll feel more like emails from friends and family, and could feel less obtrusive than the way a subject line might.
  • Call to Action: Tell email recipients what do with a clear call to action. What’s a better way to get them to open the email?
  • Tease: Write copy that teases and makes customers wonder. Their curiosity will get the best of them.

The Bottom Line
Preheader text is too valuable to not think about it. Preheaders help customers understand your message quickly, as well as give them an incentive to open your messages. Emails with a preview pane showing “Preview it in your Browser” sadly wastes this space. To drive your open rates higher, put as much care and thought into preheaders as you put into your subject lines.

Cold Email Prospecting: Getting Busy Buyers to Reply

Transactional Messaging - Much More than Just a Confirmation EmailThe Web is littered with horrible advice on cold email prospecting tips and strategy. Templates? Even worse. So here’s what I’ve learned works.

No theory, just what I’ve learned along side my most creative, diligent customers. Here is a practical way to diagnose and fix your cold email templates. Fast.

Avoid the Most Common Mistakes
It’s obvious. So obvious. But are you doing it?

Is your email different?

Is it provocative? Does it spark curiosity in a way that is hyper-focused on the buyer?

You’ll fail every time — unless your first touch email is:

  • under 10 sentences
  • focused exclusively on the buyer (not referencing yourself, nor current clients, nor benefits)
  • not asking for a meeting
  • without Web links or PDF attachments

Is your first message structured — written — to earn permission for a discussion?

The 3 Reasons Prospects Don’t Reply
Most cold email templates fail to break-the-ice and earn replies because they:

  • Have subject lines that telegraph what’s inside (never get opened).
  • Contain messages focusing on the seller (often pretending to be personalized).
  • Ask for a meeting and share a Web link or PDF (distracting them from replying).

In 95 percent of cases I see, buyers aren’t responding because the goal of the email sender is focused on earning a meeting. If you’re selling a complex B-to-B product or service, practicing challenger selling, or if closing takes months beware: Do not ask for the meeting in your first touch.

Everything (bad) flows from this flawed objective.

Instead, think in terms of provoking a short discussion … that might (if needed) lead to a meeting.

Then, conduct the conversation (via email) in a way that creates an urge in good prospects… to ask you for the appointment. Poor prospects will fall away. They will self qualify/disqualify themselves.

All because of how you structured words … how well you copywrite.

Creative Cage Match: Lindy Bop vs IKEA

For this round of the Creative Cage Match, let’s see how a UK-based, vintage-inspired clothing e-tailer stacks up against the the world’s largest furniture retailer when it comes to holiday-inspired email messaging.

There’s a reason that pro-wrestling is so popular — and it’s not just the juicy drama and bespangled costumes. People love a good fight, and have for millennia, dating back to the gladiators of Rome and beyond.

So, once a month I’m going to select two marketers and toss them into a Creative Cage Match. I’ll be looking at everything ranging from email to direct mail, website to mobile site. It’ll be a mix of objective and subjective, and each time a marketer will walk out of the ring triumphantly.

The holiday season is upon us, whether you like it or not. Bring on the shopping anxiety, the 24/7 holiday music, the office parties, the family functions, the gift wrapping, and did I mention shopping anxiety?

Let’s see how a UK-based, vintage-inspired clothing e-tailer stacks up against the the world’s largest furniture retailer when it comes to holiday-inspired email messaging.

In this corner we have Lindy Bop, a relatively young — at four years — e-tailer based in the UK specializing in retro women’s fashion. This player makes its mark in the vintage/pin-up/rockabilly world by offering affordable prices and high quality goods (I should know, I own five fantastic Lindy Bop dresses).

Across the ring, we have Sweden-based IKEA, with more than 370 stores in 47 counties as of August 2015. While the company does have an online component, most consumers know IKEA for its massive yellow and blue stores, full of everything you could possibly need for your home (including Swedish meatballs … I should know, I have a bag of them in my freezer right now).

Email vs. Email
In late November, the following email from Lindy Bop hit my inbox with the subject line: “Find Your Perfect Party Dress At Lindy Bop.

All right, pretty tame in the way of subject lines, but the e-tailer comes back strong with this preheader: “Glam & gorgeous party dresses from just $45.99.”

I like party dresses, I like getting glammed up during the holidays, and I especially like the $45.99 price point.

Lindy Bop Holiday email

The overall look and feel of the email is clean. I’m not overwhelmed; instead there is a linear progression through the message as you scroll. First, the holiday dresses; next, a sale of 30 percent off select items; then, some suggestions for items to complete your look, ranging from petticoats to gloves; and finally, a banner with all of Lindy Bop’s social sites. Clean and to the point, while also offering a handful of product images to catch my eye.