WWTT? KFC Offers Game Day Wings Subscription and Sells Out ASAP

Lately, it seems like the major players in fast food have been keeping themselves agile when it comes to marketing in attention-grabbing ways, if not downright viral.

Lately, it seems like the major players in fast food have been keeping themselves agile when it comes to marketing in attention-grabbing ways, if not downright viral. Popeyes made a splash with its sold-out chicken sandwich at the end of summer, and now KFC — another purveyor of chicken — announced a game day wings subscription and sold out in one day. And of course, because it’s KFC and football season, there’s a very special Colonel for this campaign.

https://youtu.be/n2w-Kl86vu8

So, for $75, subscribers will be able to have 48 made-to-order wings delivered (or they can pick them up) every week for 10 weeks. Week 10 includes a Double Wing Bonus ticket, tossing in an additional 48 wings, bringing the total of the subscription to 528 wings. According to KFC, the Seasoned Ticket subscription is valued at more than $400 per Seasoned Tickets package. Oh … and the tickets smell like fried chicken. Because, you know … this is KFC, home of the fried chicken scented sunscreen.

KFC worked with Stubhub on the subscription promotion available to up to 500 fried chicken fans, launched the campaign on Oct. 17, and then promptly sold out on the same day. This isn’t surprising, given the value of the subscription, and KFC’s ability to woo customers.

KFC sells out of Game Day chicken wing subscription
The Seasoned Ticket subscription sold out in a day on Oct. 17.

Olivier Ropars, StubHub’s CMO commented:

“We’re always looking for ways to give fans an enhanced and unique game-day experience. That’s why we are excited to partner with KFC for the launch of KFC Seasoned Tickets, a really fun offer at a great value that only StubHub and KFC can exclusively curate like this.”

While there were only 500 people lucky enough to snag the Seasoned Tickets, consumers can still order the wings online for delivery or at KFC restaurants for their menu price. And sure, you can argue that 500 subscriptions aren’t that many — the revenue only comes in at $37,500 — but it will be interesting to see how this campaign boosts overall sales of wings for KFC, especially during football season.

 

Testing: Sometimes, the Little Things Count

We’re always seeking new approaches to achieve breakthrough results in direct response marketing, and sometimes we get a big win with a bold new concept. But while you’re on the quest for a big idea, don’t overlook the little things. Slight changes, particularly in your call to action or offer structure, can result in incremental improvements and even significant lifts in response. And in the online world, these tests are easy to execute and results can be read quickly.

testing in marketing
“A/B testing,” Creative Commons license. | Credit: Flickr by Howard Lake

We’re always seeking new approaches to achieve breakthrough results in direct response marketing, and sometimes we get a big win with a bold new concept. But while you’re on the quest for a big idea, don’t overlook the little things. Slight changes, particularly in your call to action or offer structure, can result in incremental improvements and even significant lifts in response. And in the online world, these tests are easy to execute and results can be read quickly.

Recently, I moderated a panel for the Philly DMA. Panelists Caleb Freeman of Calcium USA, Kate Gomulka of MayoSeitz Media, Julie Herbster of Quattro Direct, and Arly Iampietro of Nutrisystem all shared tips on optimizing online marketing.

Some of the insights Iampietro conveyed illustrate how little things can result in significant wins. She’s responsible for optimizing the website user experience at Nutrisystem. So Iampietro showed us how minor changes to the copy on the call-to-action button, like using a caret (>) next to the button text, made a big difference in guiding customers through the conversion process. Also, for a high-commitment product like a diet program, things that suggested a commitment by the visitor before the person was ready to commit depress response.

For example, early on in the user experience:

  • “Continue >” stimulates more clicks than “Order now >”
  • “View plan >” outperforms “Get started >”

Other easy tests include changing up the imagery on the site. For example, men converted better when shown pictures of men with women rather than with other men.

Offer structure is highly important and easy to test. In his book “Predictably Irrational,” psychologist Dan Ariely relates a classic example of how a simple change in the offer structure made a difference for The Economist magazine. He presented a group of 100 MBA students with the following offers:

  • Internet-Only Subscription                    $59
  • Print-Only Subscription                        $125
  • Print and Internet Subscription          $125

The results — 84 selected the combo offer vs. 16 selecting Internet only. With the “Print Only” decoy offer removed, only 32 selected the combo offer. I repeated this experiment with a group of 30 undergrad students, presenting the scenario without the decoy offer first. None of them chose the print and Internet option. With the decoy offer inserted, about half went for the combo offer — and these were budget-conscious undergrads who don’t consume print as a rule!

Easy-to-execute tests that bring big results are not limited to online marketing. In my agency days, we had a B2B client who was sending millions of mailers out each season. We tested multiple creative executions against a very recalcitrant control every year, without a significant win. Then we decided to buck traditional direct wisdom that mailing to an actual name would outperform a non-personal address. What we found was that addressing mail to the functional title of the decision-maker outperformed our mailings to specific names, some of which may no longer have been at the company. So don’t be afraid to test against your long-held assumptions, so long as you do it in a limited way.
The takeaway? A big win doesn’t always come from a big change.

What little things have you done that have generated big wins?

The ‘Continuity’ of Subscription Marketing — Wow, It’s Everywhere!

Somewhere down the line, I missed the memo that “continuity clubs” is now a yesterday term and that “subscription marketing” is preferred. While some of us may recall “12 CDs for $.01” or may even today have a favorite product-of-the-month subscription, it seems marketing has fallen in love with subscriptions.

Somewhere down the line, I missed the memo that “continuity clubs” is now a yesterday term and that “subscription marketing” is preferred. While some of us may recall “12 CDs for $.01” or may even today have a favorite product-of-the-month subscription, it seems marketing has fallen in love with subscriptions.

Such was the topic of a recent Direct Marketing Club of New York luncheon — where featured representatives from the entirety of the “subscription ecosystem” shared their perspectives: Barry Blumenfield, BMI Fulfillment; Jim Fosina, Amora Coffee & Amora Tea; Robert Manger, Sandvik Publishing; Pattie Mercier, Vantiv; Craig Mirabella, EverBright Media; George Saul, Fosina Marketing — and serving as moderator, Stephanie Miller, TopRight.

It is truly astounding so many products can be “moved” by subscriptions — nail polish (Julip), underwear (FreshPair), software (Adobe), music streaming (Spotify, Apple), men’s designer wear (Trunk Club for Men), women’s shoes (Shoe Dazzle), cosmetics and personal care (Birchbox), buyers’ clubs (Amazon Prime), and dates (match.com) — just a few of the examples offered up, in addition to coffee/tea (Amora), and educational learning (EverBright Media and Sandvik Publishing) that were represented on the panel.

While the channels and the product mix have expanded, some tried-and-true maxims from the days of “book and music clubs” have not been lost, according to the panelists. They include:

  1. It’s all about the bond with the customer — how you differentiate your product and service to justify a continuing relationship and greater lifetime value.
  2. This is a direct marketing business — pay attention to marketing ROI in every detail, even when business is great, there could be warning signs of waste and cost in specific areas of marketing spend.
  3. The entirety of the customer experience needs to be looked after — from product development , to advertising, to ordering, to service (extending from self-service to contact centers), to fulfillment.
  4. Pay particularly close attention to such areas as technology and fulfillment: surprise and delight requires such focus.

While channel expansion has brought to the marketplace new realities:

  1. Does your brand have a “thumb stopping” moment? With more and more mobile engagement, subscription marketers must make it easy to stop the consumer, make her pause, and consider the product/service offer in a mobile moment.
  2. There is a role for every channel — but each channel has its own metrics to pay attention to. While the panelists were proprietary with details, the lifetime value of a customer acquired via email, direct mail, DRTV, website or mobile most likely is distinct from each other — and may have different attrition rates. You’ll need to manage these distinctions in the marketing mix.
  3. A payment processing partner is important. In any given year, millions of credit cards expire — and this will be even more prevalent as chip-enabled cards flow into the marketplace.
  4. “Bill me” invoicing — once a mainstay in the business — has practically disappeared altogether over the last five years — as consumers in general appear to have become more casual about not paying.

To say the least, this business model has expanded far beyond books, magazines and music — and it makes me wonder: What’s next?

5 Great Ideas in B-to-B Content Marketing

I recently got my hands on a copy of Joe Pulizzi’s new book, Epic Content Marketing, and I can’t say enough good things about it. Pulizzi has figured out how marketers can apply publishing techniques to marketing objectives, and, along with a couple of other leaders in the category, like Ann Handley and Joe Chernov, has articulated an entirely new type of marketing. One that really works, especially in B-to-B

I recently got my hands on a copy of Joe Pulizzi’s new book, Epic Content Marketing, and I can’t say enough good things about it. Truth is, as content marketing has exploded in the last couple of years, a jillion books on the subject have come along. But this is the one to acquire for your marketing library, for two reasons. First, it’s your one-stop shop on the entire subject, from strategy and planning, to thorny execution matters like measuring the ROI. Second, Pulizzi himself stands at the epicenter of content marketing today, having founded the Content Marketing Institute, and speaking all over the world on this hot new marketing field.

But, as Pulizzi points out early in the book, marketers have used content for centuries, in the form of custom publishing like The Furrow, a print magazine for farmers published by John Deere since 1895. Pulizzi should know, having headed up custom publishing for Penton, which is where I first met him. In fact, he commissioned me to write a piece of content for Penton, on B-to-B retention marketing techniques.

Since then, Pulizzi has figured out how marketers can apply publishing techniques to marketing objectives, and, along with a couple of other leaders in the category, like Ann Handley and Joe Chernov, has articulated an entirely new type of marketing. One that really works, especially in B-to-B.

Here are five of the great marketing ideas I picked up from Epic Content Marketing:

  1. Content formats that I’d never thought of. Pulizzi discusses the usual B-to-B content marketing suspects (blogs, white papers, case studies, e-newsletters, articles and videos) in a meaty chapter on Content Types. But here are several possibilities for sourcing content that were new to me: An e-learning curriculum, online news releases, executive roundtables, discussion forums and teleseminars.
  2. The importance of telling a great story. Most of us in B-to-B prepare content around business problems, focusing on technical information, how-to material, and industry trends. But Pulizzi reminded me about the importance of including the personal. The “What’s in It for Me” benefits couched in business stories, that smoothly draw in readers and keep their attention.
  3. Visuals as a delivery mechanism for complex information. People respond to graphics, movement, and especially images of other people. So designing and condensing rich information into charts, images, infographics, videos and other visual formats is a great plus for business buyers, as well as consumers.
  4. Focus on securing subscriptions. Pulizzi makes a compelling case for promoting content delivered by subscription, like newsletters and social media follows. Customers and prospects who agree to hear from you regularly are likely to be your most valuable audience. To accomplish the subscription mission, you have to deliver valuable fresh content consistently, and promote the subscription vehicle with vigor. Pulizzi notes ruefully that, even though we all hate them, pop-up display ads have proven to be a powerful subscription recruitment device.
  5. Why your website needs to be the platform where most of your content is housed. Pulizzi explains the importance of owning, versus renting, your content platform. When your material lives on Twitter or LinkedIn, it is not under your full control.

I recommend Epic Content Marketing to everyone who sells to business buyers.

A version of this article appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.

An ABC Introduction to Data Mining for Dollars: Slicing and Dicing Your In-House List for Profit (Part 1 of 2)

One of the best ways to build your online business is to build your list; that is, your “database” of potential subscribers, customers or prospects. This may not be as sexy as social marketing, as robust as mobile marketing or as challenging as search engine marketing … but it is a viable way to harness the power within your own “house file” to maximize your marketing ROI.

One of the best ways to build your online business is to build your list; that is, your “database” of potential subscribers, customers or prospects. This may not be as sexy as social marketing, as robust as mobile marketing or as challenging as search engine marketing … but it is a viable way to harness the power within your own “house file” to maximize your marketing ROI.

Today, I’ll show you how you can segment your database of names to boost sales, increase bonding and shorten conversion time. Data mining, list segmentation or strategic database marketing is basically the art of slicing and dicing your own in-house list of names for optimal performance. You do this to help increase the response of your promotional and conversion efforts.

You see, once you divide your list of names into smaller groups (known as segmentation), you can target your product offers and promotional messages to each of those groups. By customizing your marketing messages based on specific customer needs, you’ll be promoting products to people who are more likely to buy them. You increase your customers’ satisfaction rate as well as your potential conversion rates. And higher conversion rates mean more money for your company.

One data-mining model is the RFM method. It’s practiced by direct response marketers all over the world. “R” stands for Recency—how recently a customer has made a purchase. “F” stands for Frequency—how often the customer makes a purchase. And “M” stands for Monetary—how much the customer spends. Here’s how you can use the RFM method to help lift your sales.

Recency
Whether your house list is made up of people who signed up to receive your free e-zine or people who paid for a subscription, you can segment your database according to how long your subscribers have been with you. For instance, you can create categories such as: 0-6 months, 6-12 months, and 12-plus months. You would look at these groups as your hot subs (newest subscribers 0-3 months), warm subs (mid-point subscribers) and cool subs (those who have been subscribing to your e-zine the longest, 12-plus months).

Here’s one way you can put that data to use …

Let’s say some of your “cool subs” have lost their initial enthusiasm for your e-zine. You could cross-reference those names with their open rates. If most of these subscribers haven’t been opening your e-zine in six, nine or 12 months, you may consider sending them a special message asking to reengage them. These “inactive” subscribers are a great group on which to test new marketing approaches, new prices and new subject lines. Since this group is not responding to your current emails, why not use this as a platform to reengage AND test? Your “hot subs” are your newest, most enthusiastic subscribers. They are ripe to learn more about you, your products and your services. If you handle this group properly, you can cultivate them into cross-sell and up-sell customers.

For example, send your “hot subs” a special introductory series of emails (also known as auto responder series). This special series would encourage bonding and introduce readers to your e-zine’s contributors and overall philosophy. It could also tempt readers with specially priced offers. Sending an introductory series like this can not only increase the number of subscribers who convert to paying customers, it also increases their lifetime value (LTV)—the amount they spend with you over their lifetime as your customer. Hot Tip! Make sure to suppress the recipients of your auto responders from any promotional efforts until the series is complete to ensure more effective bonding.

If, instead of subscribers to a free e-zine, your house list is made up of people who paid for their subscription, the same segmentation process applies. You break your active subscribers into hot subs, warm subs and cool subs. You also break out “expires” (those who allowed their subscription to run out) and “cancels” (those who cancelled their subscription).

Cross-marketing to these lists is usually effective. The expires oftentimes simply forget to renew and need a reminder. And just because someone cancelled one subscription doesn’t mean they may not be ideal for another service or product that you provide. If they’re still willing to receive email messages from you, add these folks to your promotional lists. Once you’ve gotten these cancelled subscribes to open your messages, turning them into paying customers is just a matter of time. Most Internet marketers would have written these people off. So any revenue you get from them is ancillary.

Next time, I’ll go into Frequency and Monetary, the two other components of the RFM model. So stay tuned!