Defined by a Screen

I grew up with TV. My eyes prefer a larger screen. I focus on what I watch. I can’t multitask between screens and I have no tolerance for audio from multiple devices chiming at me concurrently. Who can even watch stuff on a tiny screen? Well, plenty do.

chet tv picWhen one watches TV as much as I do, it’s indeed tough to break the habit.

Sports, public television, movie classics, local and national news and weather — I consume a lot of content. Habitually, when I wake up, the TV comes on. When I go to bed, the TV goes off … unless I fall asleep first.

And while laptops, desktops, smartphones and tablets (and movie screens) are also a part of my life, for work, info in transit, games and entertainment, it’s the home television that is my preference to consume content. I’m less scheduled to the TV these days than I used to be thanks to on-demand programming and the media bingeing that goes with it. However, I’m still, most of the time, passively engaged nonetheless by whatever channel is programmed to send to me at whatever hour of day or night.

It’s a matter of demographics. I grew up with TV. My eyes prefer (or were trained to prefer) a larger screen. I’m immersed in TV as if it’s a miniature experience inside a movie theater. I focus on what I watch. I can’t multitask between screens and I have no tolerance for audio from multiple devices chiming at me concurrently. Who can even watch stuff on a tiny screen?

Well, plenty do.

As reported by eMarketer, “Millward Brown, which surveyed — via smartphone or tablet — more than 13,500 16- to 45-year-old multiscreen users across 42 countries, found that half of all video viewing happens on TV sets — split between live TV and on-demand TV. The other half comprises mainly mobile devices, which includes smartphones and tablets. Smartphones take the largest digital share, encompassing 22 percent of total daily time spent viewing video.”

Personally, I prefer my TV at home — I like to watch the world when I’m outside my house. Mobile video, however, is exploding. The survey states, “The rise in mobile video viewing is part of a larger transition to multiscreen usage. In fact, mobile users worldwide spend 52 percent of their daily internet and viewing video time on mobile phones. To compare, the share of daily time spent with computers makes up 21 percent, while TV accounts for 27 percent.”

Less tethered. Less structured. Less scheduled. Smaller screens. More on demand, with one exception. What’s happening to video content today is largely leaving me behind.

But, not for long.

Those other devices are creeping more and more into my leisure mainstream.

  • When I watch sports on TV, the tablet concurrently gives me real-time stats.
  • When a TV commercial pops on (and on and on), I clear my email on my smartphone.
  • I use caller ID to screen calls — and often send a text in response.
  • I reach for a mobile app when I hear a song on the TV (or radio) and I want to download it later.
  • And four out of five TV breaks most often involves Words With Friends or some other tiny screen pursuit.

I’m really getting tired of paying $200 per month for cable triple package, plus $170 per month for a smartphone/tablet and mobile wifi — and watching my 15 gigabytes of monthly data get chewed up in one or two movie downloads. This is not sustainable and it’s pretty dumb not to do something about it.

You know what I’m gonna do? I’ll look to cut the cord tomorrow, because right now I’ve got to get back to my program.

10 Reasons Tablets Will Change Video for Direct Marketers

Tablets are quickly becoming the foundation of what may be the tipping point for entering a post-PC era. Direct marketers who start early and learn fast how to take advantage of the exploding tablet marketplace—prime for video direct marketing—will be poised to grow with consumers’ evolving media consumption trends. These changes are fueled

Tablets are quickly becoming the foundation of what may be the tipping point for entering a post-PC era. Direct marketers who start early and learn fast how to take advantage of the exploding tablet marketplace—prime for video direct marketing—will be poised to grow with consumer’s evolving media consumption trends. These changes are fueled by several trends in the market.

Today’s video blog discusses 10 reasons for direct marketers to grasp the potential of marketing and video presentation for the exploding tablet market.

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

In a related aside, if you have a tablet, you might be familiar with a personalized magazine app called Zite. Zite delivers news and content to its users based on subject preferences. You, as marketers and content producers, can’t ask that your news or blogs be distributed by Zite. Only the producers of this app determine what will be pushed out to its readers. As a reader, you have the ability to tell Zite if you want more of the type of content it pushes to you, or less.

One of my news preferences is on the subject of “direct marketing.” Imagine my surprise to discover our Target Marketing blog appear among direct marketing news a couple of weeks ago. Zite linked to our video, where I was able to easily watch it. Viewing on the iPad with Apple’s new Retina screen was easier on the eyes than watching on my desktop PC.

Folks, if you don’t have a tablet, get one—if only to see how a growing population of your prospects is viewing you and their world. Imagine the possibilities of using it to market your products or services. With nearly 120 million tablets expected to be purchased by consumers this year alone, the demand is already there to present your product and service offerings.

Optimizing Paid Search Campaigns for the ‘Third Device’

It’s time to think of tablets as a distinct “third device” and devise performance marketing strategies to engage tablet users. Advertisers must take advantage of the ability now offered in AdWords to target smartphones and tablets separately.

Tablets are the fastest-selling consumer technology device in history. According to eMarketer, 24 million U.S. consumers will own a tablet by the end of this year. By the end of 2012, 12.8 percent of people in the U.S. will own a tablet.

As of June 1, Google AdWords began separating “tablets with full browsers” as a distinct device within AdWords reporting. Previously, tablets were grouped with all “mobile devices with full browsers” (i.e., smartphones). Thus, June gave us our first look into tablet paid search impression and click volume. Impressions and clicks were immediately high in June, showing that tablets have likely been materially contributing to Google mobile paid search share for a number of months.

For Performics’ aggregate client base, 12.1 percent of all June desktop and mobile paid search impressions came from mobile devices. Of this 12.1 percent, 14.3 percent came from tablets. Based on these numbers, tablets now compose 1.7 percent of all paid search impressions. Additionally, tablets contributed to 13.3 percent of all mobile paid search clicks. Tablet cost per clicks track at about 50 percent of PC cost per clicks. The bottom line is that consumers are now on tablets searching for your brand, and it’s not expensive to engage them.

It’s time to think of tablets as a distinct “third device” and devise performance marketing strategies to engage tablet users. Advertisers must take advantage of the ability now offered in AdWords to target smartphones and tablets separately. At Performics, we’ve seen that tablet usage patterns resemble mobile patterns — people do most of their tablet searching in the evening. However, people use tablets differently than smartphones, which reveals opportunities to optimize your paid search campaign for the third device.

Unlike smartphones, tablets feature advanced scrolling functionality. Since tablet users can scroll with a gesture, they’re more likely to peruse search results and landing pages. This makes tablet users more likely than smartphone users to click on search results that are further down the page. Thus, bid strategies should differ when targeting tablets versus smartphones.

Tablets have bigger screens than smartphones. Tablet traffic should therefore be driven to desktop — not mobile — landing pages, where users have more room to browse.

A different device means different copy optimization opportunities. Once tablets are separated into distinct search campaigns, copy and links can be geared specifically to tablet users — e.g., “purchase now from your tablet” or “buy an accessory for your tablet.”

As the device landscape becomes increasingly fragmented, performance marketers must capitalize on every little opportunity to optimize advertising by device. Brands that tailor advertising to support tablets will achieve a first-mover advantage as tablets increase in popularity. This advantage comes in the form of data — e.g., nuances in how your customers use different devices — which reveal opportunities to engage consumers in more effective and efficient ways.

Have you noticed ways that your customers interact with tablets differently than smartphones or PCs? If so, please leave a comment below.

Which is Better for Mobile Shopping, Tablets or Smartphones?

Are you wondering whether it’s worth providing your online retail offering on tablets, particularly the iPad? Are you also facing the challenge of how to get your mobile strategy on track? Before you decide which course to follow, here’s some data to consider:

Are you wondering whether it’s worth providing your online retail offering on tablets, particularly the iPad? Are you also facing the challenge of how to get your mobile strategy on track? Before you decide which course to follow, here’s some data to consider:

Although only a small percentage of users, tablets are poised to more than double their U.S. installed base penetration in 2011 to 7.6 percent of the population, or 24 million devices, according to eMarketer. Two out of five consumers considering purchasing an iPad cited shopping on the device as a reason for their interest, according to research from Vision Critical in November of last year. This isn’t surprising since online shopping is a visual experience and tablets are content-consumption devices.

Early results show that targeting tablet owners rather than smartphone users may be the wise choice, according to the e-tailing group. One in 10 tablet owners used their device to browse or buy online every day versus 6 percent of smartphone owners. The research also shows that once owners start buying via a tablet, they return. Nearly 25 percent of tablet owners made at least six purchases during the past six months, compared to 15 percent of smartphone users who did the same.

Furthermore, tablet owners tend to be gadget-buying early adopters. iPad owners tend to be young, educated and affluent, an ideal target market, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project and Forrester Research.

Due to the tablet’s larger screen and better user functionality for browsing, consumers preferred the tablet shopping experience (88 percent thought it was satisfactory or very satisfactory) to that of a smartphone (73 percent thought it was satisfactory or very satisfactory).

While smartphones are great for shopping in-store or gathering information on the go, they’re not user friendly for extended research activities. In part, this is attributable to the fact that less than 5 percent of retailers have a mobile site, according to October 2010 research from Brand Anywhere and Luth Research.

Here are three tips to consider when planning your company’s mobile strategy:

  1. Take advantage of the tablet’s visual presentation (but avoid using Flash).
  2. Check how your content is formatted and renders on different tablets.
  3. Make sure that shoppers can easily purchase once they’ve seen enough.

Now is a good time to start testing tablets to enhance your customers’ shopping experience, especially if your products are highly visual in nature or need to be seen in the environment in which they’ll be used. Bear in mind that tablets and smartphones fulfill different shopping needs for consumers, therefore you shouldn’t choose one option over the other.