In Defense of Selling With Social Media

If presidential hopeful Mitt Romney doesn’t need to defend his financial success, why should I be forced to defend my book teaching people how to sell on Facebook? Lately, I’ve been taking flack from good-natured but misguided people in the social media community. And that’s fine. Everyone is entitled to his opinion and I’m fully aware that some people in marketing get paid to spend on branding rather than produce tangible outcomes.

If presidential hopeful Mitt Romney doesn’t need to defend his financial success, why should I be forced to defend my book teaching people how to sell on Facebook? Lately, I’ve been taking flack from good-natured but misguided people in the social media community. And that’s fine. Everyone is entitled to his opinion and I’m fully aware that some people in marketing get paid to spend on branding rather than produce tangible outcomes. In fact there’s a multi-billion dollar industry backing them.

But for a good few years now we’ve been told by “the experts” to avoid selling on social media. It’s not the place to sell and if we don’t understand that, they say we “don’t get it.” And for a good while now we—direct response marketers—have been feeling bad … like we don’t “get it.”

Enough is enough. We’re being told to stop selling by the same people who claim there’s a marketing revolution going on. But the reality is that the social media revolution is a lie. It isn’t happening and never happened. Proving this is simple: Count the number of totally revolutionized businesses that have fundamentally reinvented marketing—or business itself. Where are they?

Has your business been revolutionized by YouTube, Facebook, LinkedIn, blogs or Twitter? Mine has been improved by these tools, but only because I haven’t listened to self-anointed experts! The global economy is on the brink. Selling in social media is just another way out, isn’t it?

I think being able to put bread on the table with social media is just fine. In fact, it’s great and I intend to do more with Facebook, YouTube and blogging to sell my products and services. Does this make me “not get it” or some kind of obnoxious pusher in social spaces? No. It makes me even more responsible to myself and customers. I need to be more relevant, succinct (in delivering my service) and valuable to them.

And I absolutely do not believe in the very popular myth that sales will somehow materialize if I just use social media—or get re-tweeted more often. So next time you hire a social media “expert” claiming that “social currency” is more important than real currency tell them that’s how you’ll pay them—in social currency. That’s how I see it, how about you?