When Viral Marketing Goes Too Far

A couple of years ago, our local newspaper, The Philadelphia Inquirer, ran a disturbing story about how a mortgage loan company in Phoenix had sent spam advertising messages which appeared on the screens of thousands of wireless phone customers. Not only were the messages not requested, but these customers had to pay to retrieve them.

A couple of years ago, our local newspaper, The Philadelphia Inquirer, ran a disturbing story about how a mortgage loan company in Phoenix had sent spam advertising messages which appeared on the screens of thousands of wireless phone customers. Not only were the messages not requested, but these customers had to pay to retrieve them.

In the United States, phone numbers are allocated to wireless companies in blocks of 9,999, all beginning with the same three-digit prefix following the area code. The text messaging address for each mobile phone is derived from the phone number assigned to each customer’s handset and the wireless company’s name. This means that an advertiser can simply choose any three digit prefix in an area code and send a message to 10,000 people by changing the last four digits after the prefix

One industry analyst noted that this is just the tip of the iceberg. This type of spam is cheap and easy for advertisers to use. Wireless text messaging is widely used in the U.S.; and, while some carriers are taking precautions to protect their customers from text message advertising, so far neither the direct marketing industry nor the federal government has been able to control this form of spam. As the president of the mortgage company noted, the advertising had brought in new clients and “There still isn’t any rule against emailing.” Online, the concept of “permission marketing” is similarly tossed aside each day with the receipt of unsolicited promotional emails.

We call this indiscriminate solicitation of prospective customers one variation of the “Casanova Complex” customer acquisition model, reflective of the 18th century Italian adventurer, perhaps best known for his many female “conquests.” In the haste to bring in customers, companies can often forget to court the right customers, those who represent the best long-term revenue potential, or who won’t overtax the company’s customer service and support structure.

If offline instances of the Casanova Complex are a disease, then it is an epidemic among Internet companies. Many online retail sites have engaged in sweepstakes and other customer generation programs. Their objectives, they say, are to create “viral” promotions which create excitement for their sites and build their databases of available names both inexpensively and quickly. In one instance, a portal site which runs more than 1,000 websites featuring links to other sites signed up 50,000 registrants in a “Win Up to $4,000” game. Another sweepstakes program secured 126,000 registrants. An online travel products retailer, offering 1 million air miles to the winner, generated more than 60,000 names in 90 days, almost all of whom were new to the site.

The big issue for any of these sites is—do these promotions and schemes draw attractive customers who can then be cultivated over time through the various marketing tools available today? And, once these customers are on board, are companies doing enough of the right things to keep them? Or is this just another extrapolation of the Casanova Complex? As one site marketing executive said: “This is a great, low-cost way for us to acquire new names. The jury’s still out on how many of those new people will come back.” Companies involved in developing or using promotional tools like sweepstakes, unsolicited email, or wireless spam seem inclined, though, at least for the moment, to believe that these possibilities generally don’t apply to them.

For traditional offline companies, the Internet may be “commoditizing” their industry or undermining customer relationships. Many brick and mortar CEOs say a key corporate goal is to transition more of their offline customers to online, self-transactional usage. Why? Because an online transaction costs dramatically less than a brick-and-mortar transaction, there is less risk for service error, and the company can more effectively capture and leverage information from an online transaction, to cite a few advantages. Certainly, the transactional advantages of e-commerce are very appealing. But what about the effects on loyalty—especially for new customers?

One of the important ways both online and offline companies can discipline themselves to avoid the Casanova Complex is to apply personalization in all contact with customers, both new and established. This, at least, gives companies a better chance of establishing the basis of a value-based, viral relationship with these customers.

While it’s been estimated that more than 80 percent of e-commerce sites have customer and visitor email personalization capabilities (Opens as a PDF), less than 10 percent of the sites used personalization in follow-on marketing campaigns. For websites favoring incentive devices like sweepstakes and frontal assault “push” email programs to attract potential customers, personalized communication is the perhaps the best opportunity to demonstrate ongoing interest in customers—especially new ones.

Personalization is at the heart of the “relationship” in successful online CRM programs. Ultimately, it’s what makes any CRM effort viral.

6 Factors to Align Direct Marketing Channels With Your Customers

Studies abound about which channels consumers prefer for receiving direct marketing messages. Some studies say consumers prefer direct mail. Others say it’s email. Then, there is the growing use of personalized web experience, social media, text messaging and other forms of messaging. The proliferation of devices and channels seems to be

Studies abound about which channels consumers prefer for receiving direct marketing messages. Some studies say consumers prefer direct mail. Others say it’s email. Then, there is the growing use of personalized web experience, social media, text messaging, and other forms of messaging. The proliferation of devices and channels seems to be unending.

In reality, your customers and prospects will demonstrate to you which channel they prefer, based on their actions. That’s what makes direct marketing what it is. But we are going to offer five qualitative factors, and one bottom line quantitative factor, to internally evaluate and align your message delivery strategy and channel with your customer and prospect’s preferences.

Qualitative factors for customer preference can include:

  1. Pure-play Sales Marketing vs. Content
    As customers and prospects are presented with marketing messages, do they view it as pure-play marketing (i.e., they see through it as your attempt to sell something), or as information and content that will be helpful to them? For example, publishers have succeeded for years when their messaging felt more like helpful information than a pitch to sell a subscription.
  2. Time Sensitivity
    Clearly an email can feel more time sensitive than direct mail, yet, experienced direct mail copywriters have for years been able to convey urgency in copy. But for your customers and prospects, other channels can be perceived as more time sensitive. Email, social media, telesales and even texting are channels that may feel most urgent.
  3. Shelf Life
    Email can vanish in a click. Direct mail can disappear in the trash bin (although it can be fished out of the trash). Higher production value catalogs and direct mail may be held onto longer than down-and-dirty printed packages. And higher production values (such as colors, textures, folds, tip-ons, stickers, die-cuts,and the visual impact of an 11×17 fold-out brochure) are impossible to convey in an email.
  4. How Did They Get My Name?
    Customers probably won’t be as concerned about privacy, but prospects can be much more sensitive. This can be especially the case if your offer touches on information such as health of personal finances. The trust factor is huge in prospects taking an action to pursue learning more about you, or making a purchase decision.
  5. How Do I Know You?
    Prospecting via email can be challenging to get opens and clicks. Run the numbers first (see our post on how to run the numbers). Direct mail for prospecting is getting more and more costly. Social media followers opt-in when they see you on various platforms or are referred to you by a friend. But consider that consumers often identify with social media as a personal platform, not necessarily as a place, to interact with marketing organizations. Better: Your prospect initiates the contact with you, and thus, become a lead. How do you do that? Content marketing, using those other online channels, can be a game-changer for you.

Quantitative Factors: As for quantitative factors you can use to align direct marketing to the media, there is really only one set of numbers to evaluate: Sales and cost per order (or per thousand). As an internal metric, when you evaluate your sales and cost per thousand, you can identify the ultimate metric to assess how your marketing messaging aligns with results.

Bottom line: Be aware of the studies that claim to have answers about which media channel customers prefer. But consider that you know your product better than anyone, you know the channel (or channels) that work for you, and you know your numbers. In a time when we’re awash in devices, channels, and choices, balance how you use each one so you’re aligned with how to drive cost-efficient sales.