The 5 Best HR Tips for Increasing Employee Engagement

Effective employee engagement improves sales figures, decreases workforce turnovers and improves client satisfaction. The companies with the healthiest company culture are those with management who actively engage with employees. Follow these five best HR practices for the most effective employee engagement.

Effective employee engagement improves sales figures, decreases workforce turnovers and improves client satisfaction. The companies with the healthiest company culture are those with management who actively engage with employees. Engagement within an organization is the most effective tool companies can use to track and encourage employee successes. 

Below are the five best HR practices for increasing employee engagement:

1. Employee Engagement Begins With Training

Employee training is key for ensuring new employees have a smooth transition into an organizations culture. An informative and instructive on boarding process is the foundation upon which  employee engagement begins with an organization’s goals. By communicating clear and defined expectations management can pave the path for reaching the desired results.

Unfortunately a lot of management teams fail to incorporate employee engagement into the company’s organizational structure. In fact, 55% of new hires are not provided a sufficient induction or training plan.

Every company has different organizational structures. For that reason, it is imperative that management outlines the key expectations of the role. Outlining job responsibilities is the framework for which employees can reach goals and is essential for success.

2. Communicate Role Expectations

Setting up initial goals and objectives within your organization is a great way to ensure that your staff is on the right track. Individual roles should have their own set of responsibilities. Be sure to make time every few months for communication between management and staff members. This fosters the opportunity to evaluate role satisfaction and develop a plan for employee progression and career development. This will not only increase autonomy and integrity in the work place, but also allows management to understand the respective areas of interest for future positions and hiring.

This will also bolster engagements and motivate your new employees to strive for excellence in all areas. A successful CEO will make sure that new hires have a sound understanding of the firm’s values, mission, and goals.

3. Active Engagement and Role Maintenance

Once management is confident that the new hires have fully settled in to their designated role, it is important to keep levels of employee engagement as high as possible.

Commitment and gratitude toward employees goes a long way. Model behavior for employees starts at the top. So, it is likely that a company’s staff will mirror that same level of commitment and gratitude in their work performance.

Regular “one-on-ones”, acknowledgments and objective setting will motivate employees to reach goals and improve their skillsets. Don’t be afraid to challenge your people and engage in healthy competition.

4. Promote From Within

There are many tools available for managers to utilize to acknowledge the accomplishments of their team. One of the most traditional and effective means of rewarding hardworking employees, is granting them a raise or promotion; or both if you can.  If available, promotion from within is key for morale and a great way reward your staff members for their hard work.

Promotion from within provides an extremely strong index of the firm’s core culture. Managers should recognize that the individual  rewards send a message to the entire organization. Be certain that the behaviors which are being endorsed by the promotion are in line with the firm’s culture and values. Again, being a model of positive behavior will ensure the remainder of the staff will look to emulate those behaviors you want to see reinforced.

Encouraging employee engagement through vertical communication is also great way to express mutual respect and show appreciation amongst one another.

5. Hire Multi-talented Employees

To maintain an edge in this increasingly competitive economy, companies need to ensure that they employ individuals referred to as “Unicorns” by HR managers. A Unicorn refers to a multi-skilled employee who is able to multitask and wear more than one hat.  .

Unicorns are normally talented in numerous areas and can execute them all beyond a superficial level. Finding these employees starts before the interview process. A persons references and past work experience provides a window to the type of benefits they can provide your company.

Here are some of the key advantages of hiring Multi-talented employees:

  • Multi-talented employees can save you a significant amount of money.
  • Employees with a wide range skill sets improve productivity and business efficiency. You won’t need to worry about the level of work quality since they’ll perform remarkably in all business tasks and projects handed over to them.
  • Having multi-talented employees allows for other team members to take sick and vacation days due to their ability to step into various roles. He or she can easily fill in and execute many jobs impeccably.
  • Improves staff retention and motivation.

 

What Target Marketing Readers Want … We Think

We want to improve the quality of the content and the user experience on Target Marketing, and I need your help to do that. We’re in the middle of a reader survey to get a better idea of what our readers, like you, want to see. Click through here, and I’ll tell you a little bit about the answers we’re getting so far, and give you a chance to add your input, too.

We want to improve the quality of the content and the user experience on Target Marketing, and I need your help to do that. To that end, we’re in the middle of conducting a reader survey to get a better idea of what our audience members, like you, want to see.

The results so far have been pretty surprising. For example, I never would’ve guessed that PDFs would be one of our readers’ favorite formats for content, but it came in second, right behind articles and blog posts, and above webinars, video, and other format that seem more popular. On a scale of 1 to 5, here’s what the average responses looked like for each format.

Target Marketing Reader Survey - Favorite FormatsWhen it comes to the type of content respondents think are valuable, best practices, research and tips and tricks are rising to the top, followed by case studies and interviews with marketing practitioners.

Target Marketing Reader Survey - Valuable TopicsAnd Another interesting response comes from the topics survey takers thought were valuable. Here are the top six topics they found most valuable:

  1. Marketing Strategy
  2. Content Marketing
  3. Customer Acquisition
  4. Email
  5. Customer Retention
  6. Branding, Creative and Content

And the bottom six they found least valuable:

  1. DRTV
  2. Mergers and Acquisitions
  3. Legislation and Taxation
  4. Personnel, HR, Career Development
  5. International Marketing

So, my question for you is this: Do you agree with these results? Are there other points of view you’d like us to keep in mind when we planning our content for 2018?

I’d love to hear your feedback. You can let me know in the comments or, if you haven’t already, go and take the survey yourself! We’ll leave it open for about another week to try to collect more of your point of view.

3 LinkedIn Profile Tips for Sales Professionals You Haven’t Heard Before

The Web can be an unreliable place to get sales tips. Most advice we “Google” doesn’t work. LinkedIn profile tips are no exception. Most advice focuses on superficial face-lifts. Want to get more appointments, faster, using a LinkedIn profile? Follow these three tips:

The Web can be an unreliable place to get sales tips. Most advice we “Google” doesn’t work. LinkedIn profile tips are no exception. Most advice focuses on superficial face-lifts. Want to get more appointments, faster, using a LinkedIn profile? Follow these three tips:

Make your profile:

  • earn attention
  • spark curiosity
  • earn a response

Here’s how to get it done in three simple steps.

No. 1: Convince Prospects to Read Your Summary
The job of your professional headline is to create curiosity about your Summary section. Use the headline to:

  • get found by prospects searching for you
  • connect with buyers forcefully, clearly
  • present an irresistible reason to read the Summary section

Avoid listing your professional title in this space. Be sure to use words or phrases that your target buyer would use. For example, if you sell copywriting services to natural health marketers say so, like David Tomen of Swift Current Marketing does on his professional headline.

Also, appeal to the deepest desire of your buyer. Help buyers become curious about your ability to put out a fire, scratch a bothersome itch, solve a problem or help them fast-track a goal. As David Tomen says, “I help natural health marketers get as many customers as you can handle.” 

It’s no wonder a natural health marketer would want to read more about David’s qualifications! He sparks curiosity with this approach. You can learn more about how David improved his profile in this LinkedIn profile tutorial.

No. 2: Chunk Your Summary Section
Nothing sells you better than simplicity and brevity. This creates distinction. In a world filled with people positioning themselves with adverbs and adjectives you’ll stand out. Also, create easily-scanned “chunks” or sections for your prospect to scan.

Write these sections with headlines. Make each headline appeal to what your prospect really wants to know in most cases.

Check out how Blake Henegan helps learning and development managers quickly scan his profile’s Summary section.

  • What he does.
  • How he’s different.
  • How he can help.
  • How he gets paid.
  • Training he sources for clients.
  • His contact information.

You cannot get lost in Blake’s Profile summary. It’s a wonderfully structured bit of copywriting. It’s easy to scan with the eyes and speaks to what clients want to hear about most.

No. 3: Get Back to Basics—Less Is More
Your success depends on getting good at one thing: Copywriting. Borrow from the classic, time-tested, proven techniques of B-to-B copywriters. Speak in simple terms. Be pithy. Leave out all the descriptors.

For example, don’t have exceptional skills. Have skills. Stop trying to position, sell or convince. Just say it. Plain talk is refreshing, creates distinction and helps people want to learn more about you.

Being brief, blunt and basic sparks interest in humans. It’s a fact.

Also, make sure your summary is not a recital of your experience. This is not optimal for sellers. Yes, you may wish to have an “Experience” section but don’t make your experience the focal-point.

Here is how to take action on this idea:

Make sure the Summary section of your LinkedIn profile communicates:

  • What you do;
  • who you do it for;
  • how you do it (why customers choose you) and
  • how potential buyers can act on their curiosity.

Use David and Blake’s profile summaries as guides. Borrow from them. When you’re done drafting, go back and try to remove the “I’s” and adjectives/adverbs. This focuses your writing on what the prospect wants to hear.

Once you’ve executed the first three steps above, it’s time to get your prospect off your profile and on the phone or in your email inbox. Make clear calls-to-action and, yes, include shortened Web links. While not clickable buyers will cut-and-paste or right-click (in Chrome) to visit your landing page.

Be sure to land prospects at places where the call-to-action promise is fulfilled in exchange for a bit of information about the prospect (a lead).

Remember: Give your prospects what they want. They don’t want to know about you—they want to know what you can do for them. Good luck!

The Voice of Reason

I was completely taken aback by the voice on the other end of the line. He sounded weary—like he might be having a bad month. And he spoke slowly, as if he were having trouble gathering his thoughts. I was feeling impatient. It was the middle of the business day and I had answered my phone in between meetings.

I was completely taken aback by the voice on the other end of the line.

He sounded weary—like he might be having a bad month. And he spoke slowly, as if he were having trouble gathering his thoughts.

I was feeling impatient. It was the middle of the business day and I had answered my phone in between meetings.

By the time he finally laid out his sales pitch, I had already been multi-tasking for a few minutes: dashing off an email, signing off on an expense report, and scribbling down a headline that had popped into my head for a client project.

I politely thanked him for his call, told him I wasn’t interested and hung up. His style was such a turn-off, that I couldn’t recall his name, the company he represented, or the reason he thought I might be a good prospect for his product or service. Net-net, he had wasted my time and his.

So, I have to ask: when was the last time you audited your sales team? I don’t mean their stats—number of calls, number of connects, number of leads, etc., but actually listened in on their calls? Evaluated and provided tips on how an individual might improve with regard to tone and style? It may be the downfall of your telemarketing program.

So here are a five tips to share with your team:

  • Rev the vocal chords before you start dialing for dollars. Just like an athlete warms up before starting to practice, your voice needs time to get ready. Humming, singing or talking to coworkers is a great way to get your chords warmed up.
  • Adjust your pace. A great speaking voice/style includes particular attention to rhythm, pacing, intonation and inflection. Adjusting your tone to find the warmth in your voice that can match your company brand is critical to making your listener feel the same positive energy about your product/service that you’re feeling.
  • Stand up and be heard. Many experts agree that a voice carries more range, resonance and power when the diaphragm isn’t folded over. I often find myself pacing around my office, headset on, participating in a conference call or consultative conversation. It helps me to think clearly and listen more carefully.
  • Step away from the mic. Too often, callers sound muffled or difficult to hear because of their VOIP network, cell phone coverage or background noise. Test out your line/microphone/headset on others so it doesn’t detract from your call.
  • Adapt and reflect. People love to work with people who are like them. As you listen to your prospect, try to match their volume, speed, style and tone without sounding over the top. I was taught to nod while listening (even though they can’t see you) and that “agreement” will come across in your voice.

As for the sad-sack who called me, I’d suggest he find another line of employment. It was clear he didn’t like what he was doing and these tips probably won’t help.