The Data Show: #NBCFail, or What Happens When an Industry Faces Digital Disruption

Like it or not, NBC must accept the fact that its monopoly on broadcast content has been disrupted by the emergence of new technologies, most notably the Internet and the DVR. Instead of creating a business model that leverages and monetizes on this new reality, they’ve instead tried to ram an old business model down the throats of consumers across the U.S., essentially missing the forest for the trees. As a result, they’ve pissed off millions of people, devaluing their brand in the process.

Like most Americans, I’ve spent a lot of time watching the Olympics during the past couple weeks. Probably way more than I should. To be totally honest, I haven’t been the biggest fan of NBC’s coverage, and on this I’m definitely not alone. Look, for example, at the #NBCFail Twitter campaign that erupted online during the past couple weeks. Led mostly by bloggers and new media pundits, the campaign has relentlessly lambasted NBC for its poor coverage.

A major criticism by the #NBCFail folks has centered on topics ranging from showing only American competitors, to endless and annoying human interest stories, from snarky banter with condescending hosts, to strangely jingoistic flag-waving commentary. I must say I agree that it’s generally been an unpleasant experience. But, beyond poor coverage itself, NBC has also been taking a ton of flack for its new media “strategy”—if you can call it that—that includes no live streaming content on the Web. They have an App with some live coverage, but it’s only available to those with an active paid cable subscription that includes NBC already.

Now of course many in the industry have rushed to NBC’s defense. In his recent article in Ad AgeThe Truth About #NBCFail,” Simon Dumenco states quite correctly that “NBC is not a charity.” He then goes on to explain that NBC paid about $1.2 billion for the rights to broadcast the games. That’s a lot of greenbacks. Dumenco’s point is that because NBC is not listed as a 501c3 (non-profit) organization, it has every right to run in the Olympics in a manner it sees fit in order to recoup and hopefully make a profit on its hefty investment. Fair enough.

While on one hand I tend to agree with some of the points made by Dumenco and other critics of #NBCFail, on the other I really do feel that NBC has completely bungled its new media strategy. Like it or not, NBC must accept the fact that its monopoly on broadcast content has been disrupted by the emergence of new technologies, most notably the Internet and the DVR. Instead of creating a business model that leverages and monetizes on this new reality, they’ve instead tried to ram an old business model down the throats of consumers across the U.S., essentially missing the forest for the trees. As a result, they’ve pissed off millions of people, devaluing their brand in the process.

This is eerily reminiscent of what happened to the recording industry a little more than a decade ago. Remember Tower Records? Sam Goody? Virgin Megastores? All gone. And I could continue and list off dozens. Well, guess what happened? The world changed and the recording industry lost its monopoly on distribution of its primary product. What was their master plan? Suing Napster. And all that accomplished was putting off the inevitable by a couple years at most. Today, all the old players are gone and iTunes is the world’s largest retailer of music worldwide, and has been since 2009. The craziest part is that it was only launched by Apple in 2001. It happened so fast.

Well, why was Apple, a company with no experience selling music, able to swoop in and within a few years totally dominate a legacy industry, displacing existing firms? Two words: Disruption and Innovation. Disruption caused by the emergence of new technology—namely, the Internet as a means of Distribution—enabling firms with the best new ideas to unleash Innovation on an industry ripe for transformation.

NBC and the other legacy broadcast networks are now facing similar dilemma. With the emergence of the Internet as a viable distribution channel for broadcast media, their monopoly is over. Don’t like NBC’s coverage? Well, all you need to do is locate a proxy and you can watch awesome uninterrupted streaming coverage on BBC, or China’s national network CCTV, among many others. And as if this ignominy weren’t enough, Digital Video Recording (DVR) boxes in most homes mean that almost no one is watching commercials anymore. Sure, NBC can crow about its impressive ratings while it blacks out live coverage and force millions of people to watch their broadcast in primetime. But how many of these people are tape-delaying coverage by an hour and skipping the ads? Way more than they want the advertisers to think.

What this all means is that the landscape has radically changed for the networks, though they don’t seem to realize it. How long is it before most advertisers realize that the 30-second commercial is functionally obsolete? My guess is it can’t be too long. And when they do, guess what will happen? No more 30-second ads. That will mean a HUGE revenue stream dries up for the networks as the advertisers pull their campaigns en masse. In my estimation, because the networks seem completely unprepared, this shock will be even more devastating than the loss of classified ad revenues was for newspapers.

The only solution for networks, of course, is instead of fighting change and pissing off your customers with inane blackouts and insulting restrictions that don’t work, to be the harbinger of transformation and change instead of the victim. Can they do it? It’s certainly possible. Take, for example, this past year’s absolutely brilliant Final 4 strategy by CBS/NCAA. While the tournament was broadcast on regular TV by CBS without blackouts or restrictions, there was also an amazing App you could buy that offered uninterrupted access to all the games. Sure the App needed to be purchased—but the user experience was so awesome I sure didn’t mind ponying up a few bucks to install it on my iPad.

Experience after experience has shown in an effort to prevent cannibalization of their existing business model, legacy firms miss the forest for the trees and fail to innovate in time, allowing new competitors to swoop in and change the rules of the game for them. By that time, of course, it’s way too late and they’re toast. Ask Kodak about digital photography. Bet they now wish they had started the transformation to digital a few years earlier, don’t they? Or ask Borders about eBooks? I could go on and on …

So, do you think the networks will figure it out? Let me know in your comments.

—Rio

Marketing: It’s the New IT

Spring is here and change is in the air for marketers in the way they consume technology. Big change. Not incremental or run-of-the-mill change. We’re talking a paradigm-busting tectonic shift that’s going to change the way that companies are structured. And when the dust settles, things will never be the same again, for Marketing or IT.

Spring is here and change is in the air for marketers in the way they consume technology. Big change. Not incremental or run-of-the-mill change. We’re talking a paradigm-busting tectonic shift that’s going to change the way that companies are structured. And when the dust settles, things will never be the same again, for Marketing or IT.

What do I mean? What I mean is we’re on the ground floor of a transformational process in which marketing replaces IT as the stewards of the Marketing Technology Infrastructure. At the end of this process, marketing will own and manage vast majority of IT’s responsibilities, as they relate to marketing functions. This is going to happen—sooner than you might think—as a result of several parallel trends that are already underfoot in the business world.

  • Emergence of robust and easy-to-use SaaS marketing technologies—the proliferation of tools like Constant Contact, Eloqua, SalesForce and Marketo give marketers access to incredibly powerful plug-and-play solutions that can be used with virtually no internal IT support. Because they’re delivered using the SaaS model, all updates and tech support are managed by the vendor. Talk about a marketer’s dream …
  • Development of secure and dependable cloud storage and computing infrastructure—as little as five years ago, companies could never have imagined moving their precious data outside the organization’s firewall. Oh, how times have changed! Numerous security breaches combined with improved cloud technology and falling prices for storage have turned the tables on this argument. Why go through the cost and hassle of maintaining your own databases if you don’t need to? For many companies, this is already a rhetorical question.
  • Standardization of Web-service-based API architecture—Now that API technology has grown up, so to speak, we have a universally agreed-upon language (XML) and set of standards (SOAP/REST) developers can use to tie disparate systems together. Building on point No. 1, APIs are a quick and effective way to pass information back and forth between various platforms. What’s more, a new generation of developers has grown up that’s fluent in this ecosystem, and companies are taking advantage by staffing up big time. Within the next couple years, you’ll never again hear, “We don’t have an API developer on staff.”
  • Validation of the “Platform” model for development—why build a platform when you can use someone else’s? What’s more, why try to build a better mousetrap yourself when you can leverage a network of thousands or tens of thousands of developers who are willing to give it stab? This is the power and promise of the platform model. Over the next few years, the marketing space will be increasingly dominated by large platforms who create ecosystems their clients can tap into for cutting-edge capabilities, and developers can leverage to line their pockets. By 2020, I think it’s safe to say that if you’re a developer, you’ll either be working at a platform, developing apps for one, or building tools and methodologies that pass information back and forth between them. So if you like to code, get with the platform program, and quick!

Because the relationship between IT and Marketing could be described as “frosty,” at best, I think it’s safe to say that, overall, this will be a welcome change for most CMOs. In my experience, marketing departments tend to feel that IT is understaffed, distracted and overall not a strong partner for the marketing team to rely on. If anything, the adversarial nature of this relationship will serve to accelerate the overall trend of many IT functions dissolving into marketing department’s purview.

But what’s most interesting about this process is that it will not be limited to the marketing department. Think about it. Other departments consume technology as well, right? That means it’s going to happen in parallel throughout the entire enterprise organization: Finance, Accounting, Purchasing, Procurement … They will all go through the same transformation, as software is procured from SaaS service providers, and data storage and database management is migrated to the cloud. We’re talking comprehensive and organization-wide transformation.

I’ve already seen the beginnings of this process within many of my client’s organizations. In a previous post, The Great Marketing Data Revolution, I touched upon the incredible transformation organizations are being forced to make as they deal with and try to make sense out of with the deluge of unstructured marketing data they are collecting every day, which is often referred to as “Big Data.”

For many companies, the ultimate Big Data strategy involves a Master Data Management (MDM) solution for collecting, aggregating, matching and storing this vast pool of information. While supported by IT, MDM initiatives tend to be marketing projects, as most of the data is collected and used by marketing. MDM/Big Data solutions tend to be cloud-based and take advantage some, if not all, of the four points I addressed above.

Now what’s going to happen to IT, you might ask? If you’re working in IT, don’t fret. Your department won’t disappear. But its role will undoubtedly change with the times. Instead of focusing on product development and infrastructure maintenance, IT will instead focus on identifying the right players to engage with, testing, auditing and supporting the process—not to mention providing API technologists to help tie systems together. And, possibly, developing specialized tools to help fill in gaps the marketplace has overlooked.

If you’re a developer, this means that you’re going to need to redefine your skills to align them to the needs of the marketplace. And the good news is you probably have a few years to get it sorted out. Still, things will undoubtedly change and—once the proverbial tipping point is reached—they’ll change awfully fast.

So I hope this all makes sense. I do have a feeling this may be a controversial topic for many readers—especially those in IT. If you have any questions, comments or feedback, please let me know in your comments.

The Great Marketing Data Revolution

I think it’s safe to say that “Big Data” is enjoying its 15 minutes of fame. It’s a topic we’ve covered in this blog, as well. In case you missed it, I briefly touched on this topic in a post titled “Deciphering Big Data Is Key to Understanding Buyer’s Journey,” which I published a few weeks back. For those of you who don’t know what it is, Big Data refers to the massive quantities of information, much of it marketing-related, that firms are currently collecting as they do business.

I think it’s safe to say that “Big Data” is enjoying its 15 minutes of fame. It’s a topic we’ve covered in this blog, as well. In case you missed it, I briefly touched on this topic in a post titled “Deciphering Big Data Is Key to Understanding Buyer’s Journey,” which I published a few weeks back.

For those of you who don’t know what it is, Big Data refers to the massive quantities of information, much of it marketing-related, that firms are currently collecting as they do business. Since the data are being stored in different places and many varying formats, for the most part the state they’re in is what we refer to as “unstructured.” Additionally, because Big Data is also stored in different silos within the organization, it’s generally managed by various teams or divisions. With the recent advent of Web 2.0, the volume of data firms are confronted with has quite literally exploded, and many are struggling to store, manage and make sense out of it.

The breadth of data is simply staggering. In fact, according to Teradata, more data have been created in the last three years than in all past 40,000 years of human history combined! And the pace of data is only predicted to continue growing. You see, proliferating channels are providing us with an unprecedented amount of information—too much even to store! In a marketing sense, the term Big Data essentially refers to the collection of unstructured data from across different segments, and the drive to make sense of it all. And it’s not an easy task.

Think about it. How do you compare email opens, clicks and unsubscribes to Facebook “Likes” or Twitter followers, tweets or mentions? How does traffic your main website is receiving relate to the data stored in your CRM? How can you possibly compare the valuable business intelligence you’re tracking in your marketing automation platform you’re using for demand generation, against the detailed customer records you’re storing in your ERP you use for billing and customer service? Now throw in call center data, point of sale (POS) stats … information provided by Value Added Retailers (VARs), distributors and third-party data providers. More importantly, how do they ALL compare and relate together? You get the picture.

Now this begs the next question; which is, namely, what does this mean to marketers and marketing departments. This is where it gets very interesting. You see, unbeknownst to many, there’s an amazing transformation that is just now taking place within many firms as they deal with the endless volumes of unstructured data they are tracking and storing every day across their organization.

What’s happening is firms are rethinking the way they store, manage data and channel data throughout their entire companies. I call it the Great Marketing Data Revolution. It’s essentially a complete repurposing and reprocessing of the tools they use and how they’re used. This wholesale repurposing aims not only to make sense out of this trove of data, but also to break down the walls separating the various silos where the information is stored. As we speak, pioneering companies are just now leading the charge … and will be the first to reap the immense benefits down the road when the revolution is complete.

Ultimately, success in this crucial endeavor demands a holistic approach. This is the case because this drive essentially requires hammering out a better way of doing business by reprocessing across these four major steps: Process Workflow, Human Capital, Technology, and Supply Chain Management. In other words, doing this right way may require a complete rethinking of the direction that data flows within an organization, who manages it, where the information is stored, and what third-party suppliers need to be engaged with to assist in the process. We’re talking a completely new way of looking at marketing process management.

With so many moving parts, not surprisingly there are many obstacles in the way. Those obstacles include legacy IT infrastructure, disparate marketing structure scattered across various departments, limited IT budgets and, of course, sheer inertia. But out of all the obstacles companies face, the most important may be the dearth of data-savvy staff and marketing talent that firms have on staff.

Firms are having a difficult time staffing up in this area because this transformation is actually a hybrid marketing and IT process. Think about it. The data are being created by the firm’s marketing department. As such, only marketing truly understands not only how the data are being generated, but more importantly why they’re important and how this information can be put to actionable use in the future. At the same time, the data are stored within IT’s domain, sitting on servers or stacks, or else stored in the cloud. And because the process involves a complete rethinking and reprocessing, it really needs a new type of talent—basically a hybrid marketer/technologist—to make it happen.

Many are deeming this new role that of a Data Scientist. Not surprisingly, because this is a new role, employees with these skills aren’t exactly a dime a dozen. You can read about that here in this article that appeared on AOL Jobs titled “Data Scientist: The Hottest Job You Haven’t Heard Of.” The article reports that, because they’re in such high demand, Data Scientists can expect to earn decent salaries—ranging from $60,000 to $115,000.

Know any Data Scientists? Are you involved in a similar reprocessing transformation for your firm? If so, I’d love to know in your comments.