5 Things ’60 Minutes’ (Intentionally) Didn’t Tell Americans About Data Brokers

Kids, “60 Minutes” is no longer U.S. broadcast journalism at its former best—it’s pseudo-infotainment. Frankly, correspondent Steve Kroft and company had their own point of view that they wanted to report to whip up hysteria, and it wasn’t part of any of the data-driven advertising ecosystem that anyone of us practitioners recognize. Here’s what I know—that I want every consumer to know—and what CBS and “60 Minutes” should have told its viewers:

Kids, “60 Minutes” is no longer U.S. broadcast journalism at its former best—it’s pseudo-infotainment.

The Direct Marketing Association, my editor at Target Marketing, our friends at Direct Marketing News and The Magill Report were spot on with their responses.

Frankly, correspondent Steve Kroft and company had their own point of view that they wanted to report to whip up hysteria, and it wasn’t part of any of the data-driven advertising ecosystem that anyone of us practitioners recognize. Bryan Kennedy of Epsilon did yeoman’s work: Self-regulation exists because all marketers know that data is the currency of our livelihood, and consumer trust underpins us all.

Here’s what I know—that I want every consumer to know—and what CBS and “60 Minutes” should have told its viewers:

1. You Can Opt Out
For decades, Americans have had numerous free ways to “opt-out” of the data-sharing-for-marketing-use marketplace—and millions upon millions of Americans have taken advantage of these free industry-offered programs:

  • DMAChoice, offered by DMA, allows industry-wide opt-out of prospect direct mail, email, do-not-call (for selected states) and unaddressed mail delivery.
  • Nearly all consumer brands also offer their own preference centers and in-house suppression lists on their Web sites and Privacy Policies—both for do-not-send and for do-not-share, bridging multiple channels. Many business brands also do the same.
  • More recently, the Digital Advertising Alliance and its Consumer Choice Page provides an industry-wide opt-out mechanism for targeted display ads online that are served (in a de-identified basis, by the way) based on browsing behavior. Consumers can harden their choices against cookie removal once each opt-out choice is made.
  • A similar opt-out mechanism for mobile interest-based advertising from DAA is now in the works.

2. Marketing Data Is Used for Marketing Only
Every code of conduct and every ethics guideline in our business states this clearly. Furthermore, firewalls exist between marketing data (our business’s data sources) and individual referential data (information used for private investigation, employment, credit, insurance eligibility). If “60 Minutes”—or a consumer, or anyone else for that matter—has evidence that a marketer or service provider is sharing, renting or selling marketing data for non-marketing uses, the DMA’s Committee on Ethical Business Practice would want to be first to know—so as to investigate and bring any organization into compliance. Hypotheticals and inferences are not reality, despite the innuendoes used by Kroft.

3. Sensitive Data Are Already Regulated
Areas of sensitivity that most consumers care about—personally identifiable data related to their children, financial data, health information, credit data and a few other categories—are already regulated under federal law. Marketers must adhere to these laws and regulations.

4. Fraud Is Not Marketing
Another sensitive area—where and when marketing data is breached with a likelihood for fraud—you’ll find that most marketing organizations indeed want one national standard (not 50 plus one) for how consumers are notified and what protections they are afforded. Fraud prevention—as well as data governance and data stewardship—is a heightened priority for all businesses and organizations that rely on consumer information.

5. Data Benefits Customers
Data used for marketing purposes should be a government concern: not on how to stop it—but how to promote it, both domestically and globally, to benefit consumers and the economy. On the whole, consumers demand relevance. They demand recognition. They crave personalization. And every day—millions of times a day—they vote with their wallets: They shop, they donate, they subscribe, they raise their hands, all based on their participation in commerce. Marketing data also enables competition and the innovation and variety of choices consumers enjoy. As DMA has ably documented, marketing data exchange generates sales, jobs and tax revenue—and, might I add, satisfied consumers. Yes, we need consumer protection from fraud, bad players and unfair and deceptive practices—but “our data-driven economy” is a hugely wonderful default.

Which begs the question: Where is the harm, “60 Minutes”?