8 Direct Mail Enhancements, Other Than Paper, Finishing, Coating

Enhancing your direct mail through paper, finishing, and coatings are great, but there is one more category to discuss. And Part 4 in this series is about “other” direct mail enhancements.

Enhancing your direct mail through paper, finishing, and coatings are great, but there is one more category to discuss. And Part 4 in this series is about “other” direct mail enhancements.

So why use these things in your direct mail? The special effects of enhancements change the appearance, dimensions, and texture of your mail piece. They are beautiful and eye-catching, so that they draw attention to your message and increase your response rates.

So what are some options to consider in beyond paper, finishing, and coatings?

Other Types of Direct Mail Enhancements

  • Die Cuts: There are many options for die cutting, based on your design and desired effect. Make sure to consult with your mail service provider on postal regulations if you are sending a self-mailer. Create something really fun.
  • Maps: If you are trying to drive traffic to a store location or event, use personalized maps to show your prospects and customers how to get there. The easier you make it, the more likely they are to attend.
  • Informed Delivery: The post office has this program that sends emails to people who sign up every day with images of the mail pieces that they will get that day. You can include a web link with the image of your mail piece so that people can start shopping right away.
  • Personalization: Personalization of offers is an easy way to enhance the effectiveness of your mail pieces. When you send someone a special offer tailored to them, you drive response.
  • Augmented Reality: This is a really powerful and engaging enhancement for direct mail. You can make your mail pieces come to life when your prospects or customers scan the piece with their smartphone. This is only limited by your creativity and your budget. Imagine what experience you could create.
  • Video: You can include a video screen on your mail pieces to provide an enhanced way to share your message and create a little fun. Keep them no longer than 3 minutes and make sure they are not just informative but also entertaining.
  • Social Media: When you run social media ads for your mail list on Facebook or Instagram in conjunction with your mail pieces, you increase your response rates. Of course, they need to have the same offer and general design to be recognized as part of the same campaign.
  • Google Ads: Just like with social media ads, Google ads help increase response rates. You target only the people on your mail list by appending IP address information to it.

These are just some of the things you can do with your direct mail to enhance your ROI. When adding these enhancements, you increase the value of your mail piece and make a better impression. What we touch shapes what we feel, so how are you making your prospects and customers feel? Use enhancements to create a better experience.

One thing to keep in mind as you add enhancements, you increase the production time of your pieces. So make sure to add extra time into your schedule. Make the best impression with your next direct mail campaign and see your ROI increase. Are you ready to get started?

Social Video Standards Need to Look More Like TV

Current social video measurement presents no way to standardize views cross-platform, which means publishers with large social video audiences are held back from full revenue because they can’t prove the complete picture of their audience.

Every month, 14.9 million creators (including media and brands) upload 100 million new videos, generating more than 2 trillion views across YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Twitch. Social video keeps expanding as a viable means to grow global business for both brands and publishers, alike. But without measuring the content similarly to the way TV inventory is evaluated, it’s hard to tap into those same billion-dollar budgets.

This ever-changing media environment has been pushed along by sweeping technological advances. Audiences are more global, mobile, and social than ever before. And anyone can be a creator, whether they’re traditional or digital-native publishers, brands or influencers, or building up media empires from scratch.

Because they’re shareable in nature, social videos have previously been evaluated along the lines of likes, comments, and views. Those metrics remain part of the conversation, sure. But relying solely on them is what holds social video back – especially as these platforms are progressing toward more premium inventory.

Mismatched Metrics

Current social video measurement presents no way to standardize views cross-platform; some platforms have adopted IAB and MRC standards of at least two consecutive seconds, while others have not. For Facebook and Instagram, it’s three seconds. YouTube counts video views once play is initiated, but ad views are counted differently (30 seconds, or the duration of the ad). That leads to inconsistency from platform to platform, plus there’s no way to deduplicate audiences or gain further insights about their viewing habits.

Content creators are forced to grade their own homework, relying on mismatched metrics and small panels that don’t reflect digital realities. Publishers with large social video audiences are held back from full revenue because they can’t prove the complete picture of their audience – which today includes social – to advertisers.

Establishing Social Video Value

It’s time for an evolved approach to measuring social video. To show social video audiences at parity with those of traditional media channels, there need to be uniform market standards that attach similar values regardless of global location, screen, or platform. Deduplicated audience engagement and time-based metrics like total and average watch time normalize attention and reach globally, clearly reflecting how an audience cultivated through social platforms can stand toe-to-toe with some of traditional media giants… and how agile traditional media companies keep pace digitally.

With trillions of video views generated across the world’s largest social platforms, it’s essential for the buy- and sell-side to have TV-like time-based metrics to transact on and deliver ROI with confidence. On TV, metrics like watch time, average minutes watched, and unique viewers have long been a staple of how money (and lots of it) exchanges hands. When these standards grow into essential social video measurements, combined with audience demographics and location, what’s truly stopping all of this video content from being viewed with the exact same revenue capabilities in mind?

Social video doesn’t have to stop being itself. It has advantages inherent by design, just as traditional TV does. But in order for social video’s strengths to be valued on par with TV’s, measurement needs to look more similar. Known standards will give publishers and brands access to a massive audience (and resulting revenues) they’ve previously missed out on because they’ve lacked a way to understand that audience and model ROI.

Dog’s-Eye View: Marketing Thinking That’s Outside of the ‘Dog Box’

TheDogTrainingSecret.com, which has out-of-the- box marketing thinking that relies on proven methods, should inspire copy mavens to resist the boring, tried-and-true benefit recitals and think about better ways (“narratives”) to capture the attention of dog lovers and sell them stuff. It’s about building relationships.

[Editor’s note: Peter Rosenwald may be pulling our legs saying that his dog, Jordan, wrote this post.]

My name is Jordan, and I’ll bet you didn’t know that in England, when you’ve been naughty, you are sent to the “dog box.” (It’s really your usual sleeping spot in the household. But your person says, “Stop that barking, or you’re going to the dog box!” So I’ve been there a lot.)

marketing thinking from Jordan
Jordan | Credit: Peter J. Rosenwald

But now my person, Peter Rosenwald, is a big fan of TheDogTrainingSecret.com, which he says has lots of seemingly out-of-the- box marketing ideas that rely on proven methods — but should inspire copy mavens to resist the boring, tried-and-true benefit recitals and think about better ways (I think they are called “narratives”) to capture the attention of dog lovers and sell them lots of stuff. As the gurus keep saying, it’s all about building relationships. We dogs can be very good at that.

Chet Womach is the human personality behind DogTrainingSecret and he is the one writing to you or speaking on the promotional videos. He comes over as such a nice guy, with all of the same dog training problems as his clients and prospects, that you can’t resist his almost daily come-ons.

For a dog training masterclass, Womach sends you a “ONE-HOUR WARNING,” with just a bit of a threat:

“Now for some bad news …
There are more people registered for this
class than the system can actually hold.
… So please get there a few minutes early
to avoid losing your seat.”

My person says that’s one of the best calls to action he has ever seen. I think it might have been better if Womach offered a bonus of free dog biscuits. But what do I know? I know that, like our owners (we actually own them as much as they own us), we have foibles that might be smoothed out with a good fix.

That’s why Womach rolls over the idea of a “most beautiful” competition, and completely involves the prospect when he creates a “Caught In The Act” VIDEO CONTEST” to “Show me your dog’s WORST behavior … any habit you can’t break!!! … And you’ll be automatically entered to win 1 of 3 GRAND PRIZES: Plus, be entered to win 1 of 7 FREE COPIES of my soon-to-be-released new dog training program.”

I’m sure my race of canines, especially the ones whose owners aren’t too embarrassed to enter them in a “worst behavior” contest, could do with some behavior modification. This contest ought to generate very qualified leads, while everyone is having a good bark. That “soon-to-be-released” new dog training program is what Womach is softly selling. Who would want to pass up the idea of improving his best friend?

Womach is always telling us dogs simple stories we can relate to. For example, after explaining to my person how wonderful it is to bond with your dog, he admits that “You’ve probably seen your dog get so hyper that he goes deaf to your commands … You tell him to “sit” or “stay,” but he doesn’t listen … He just goes about his business.”

The story continues, and then there is the part I like best. Because it is about Greeley, a Golden retriever just like me. “But if a small animal races by,” Womach tells us, “Greeley forgets his self-control and goes on a wild chase. Yelling ‘wait, stop!’ had zero effect on him.” He’ll end up in the dog box, for sure.

The owners of the dogs I hang out with fully understand this — and having become sufficiently involved in the narrative, they can’t resist a classic “no obligation, FREE trial offer with a hefty $37.95 monthly open-ended subscription.” If it works for them, I hope this won’t create any substance abuse problems.

marketing thinking about medicament
Credit: TheDogTrainingSecret.com

My person says that, like all good medicament ads, there has to be a big promise. And what could be better than Womach assuring us:

“Today, my friend can take Greeley anywhere and feel at ease around each other. If you’d like your dog to get in touch with his calmer side and develop self-control, Click Here Now.

Sometimes, these messages can be really way OOB (Out-of-Box) but you can’t argue that, however unusual, they are certainly eye-catching.

marketing thinking about 'Playing God'
Credit: TheDogTrainingSecret.com

I’ve often mused about the idea of playing God, and it sounds like fun. Womach must have thought so, too. Because, in addition to the video, he goes on and on and on like a possessed preacher promising Dog Heaven on Earth — and winding up, after very long copy, with a very personal promise:

And even though you’re getting a total package valued at $194 for just $37 … I’m still willing to let you have it all RISK FREE for the next 60 days, with my generous 100% money back guarantee.

marketing thinking about a free trial
Credit: TheDogTrainingSecret.com

I’m confident that “Socialization Secret” is going to make a significant difference in your dog’s life, transforming him into a happier, more relaxed, more confident companion in as little as 2 weeks.

Actually, while I know that my person really admires this imaginative promotional magic and he says he learns a lot from how Womach finds new ways to use tested DM methods, I have to admit that I find it all a bit too complicated and long-winded. But perhaps that’s because, at heart, I treasure what’s disparagingly called “a dog’s life” — playing with my toys, sleeping, eating, and being adored.

Please get your dog out of the dog box. Ask him/her what he/she thinks about all of this, and let me know. Barking preferred.

7 Interactive Direct Mail Marketing Ideas

Direct mail marketing can be fun! The more interactive it is, the better your results are going to be. With all the marketing messages people see each day; you need to make your mail stand out. How are you doing that now?

Direct mail marketing can be fun! The more interactive it is, the better your results are going to be. With all the marketing messages people see each day; you need to make your mail stand out. How are you doing that now?

Getting your customers and prospects excited about your mail creation is the key to driving better response rates. There are several ways to do this; the one that is right for you will depend on your goals, your message and your audience.

7 Direct Mail Marketing Ideas to Make Your Mailings Fun and Interactive

  1. Consider 3D Mail: There are so many choices for dimensional mail. These can be expensive for postage as most are considered parcels; however, the response rates for this type of mail are significantly higher. They are well worth the postage costs.
  2. Use Cut-Outs: Create cut outs that, when put together, create fun objects: such as paper airplanes, buildings, dolls and so on. Make sure to send instructions on how to assemble your design. You can also create a special hashtag for social media sharing.
  3. Print a 3D Image: Create 3D art for the recipient to enjoy. This is a fun throwback technology. Make sure to send glasses, too.
  4. Try PopUps: These are fun and surprising for people to interact with. The recipient pulls out the piece and it pops from a flat form into a 3D one. This is usually accomplished through the use of tuck tabs and rubber bands.
  5. What About Scratch-Off or Scratch-and-Sniff? This can really be a fun one when doing contests; people like to scratch off and see what is beneath. The fun twist is when you have scratch and sniff, which works really well for floral, food, perfume or anything that smells good. It’s probably not a good idea to have them scratch a bad smell.
  6. Incorporate Augmented Reality: Bring your mailer to life with the technology of Augmented Reality (AR). This is a really great way to showcase how interactive direct mail can be. It is super cool and fun to play with. If you think this is too expensive, you are wrong. Check out Layar or HP Reveal.
  7. Think About Video: You can add video to your mailers! These have actual screens embedded into the mailers. They can launch content when the mailer is opened or when a button is pushed. These are on the more expensive side, but if you are selling a high-end item and want to really showcase it, this can be a great choice!

These ideas can spice up your mail campaigns and get your customers excited to see your mail pieces. Get creative and have fun, but remember that there are many postal regulations. So before you create your desired format, check with a mail service provider. You will want to avoid paying extra postage. What interactive and fun mail pieces have you seen or created?

More Than Words: Visual Content Marketing Beyond Copy

Content marketing is about conveying ideas. Many of us rely almost exclusively on the written word to do the conveying for us even though, for most audiences, a picture really is worth a thousand words. So let’s look at some of the ways we can turn our content into visual content marketing.

Content marketing is about conveying ideas. Many of us rely almost exclusively on the written word to do the conveying for us even though, for most audiences, a picture really is worth a thousand words. So let’s look at some of the ways we can turn our content into visual content marketing.

Clearly, writing is always going to be a part of the process – movies have scripts, cartoons have captions, and so on. But they also have visuals. And those visuals can make all the difference in your ability to capture attention, generate leads, and win business.

Video in Content Marketing

YouTube isn’t the second largest search engine in the world for nothing.

Video adds personality to just about any subject. (Who thought blenders or razors could have personality, and yet those videos were wildly well received.)

What’s interesting here is that even though I can read copy in my head more quickly than a person (on video or not) is likely to read it aloud, the video adds another dimension to the learning experience that makes it more complete. That is, of course, as long as your on-screen talent has some, well, talent, or at least the impossible-to-define quality of being “watchable.”

Many marketers shy away from video because they perceive the cost for high-quality production to be prohibitive. But production values don’t have to be award-worthy. You simply have to connect with your audience. Grainy visuals and inaudible voice-over aren’t going to cut it, but beyond that, the bar is probably lower than you’d think.

Still, short of having a Hollywood hunk or starlet on screen, you’ll probably want to use cut-away shots that illustrate or otherwise support the points you’re making and break up the visual monotony of a talking head. If you can’t create that kind of support material, keep your videos very, very short.

Infographics as Visual Content Marketing

I didn’t select that YouTube link above for nothing … it is, of course, an infographic.

They’re certainly not new, but the are a great way to pack a lot of bite-sized nuggets of knowledge into one larger but still digestible package. Infographics cut out the fluff and focus only on the most essential data points, but they’re much more interesting than slide deck-style bullet points. They provide a visual version of the executive summary, and that’s why people love them.

They don’t always work well for more nuanced content or content that requires more detailed consideration, but even in those cases, infographics can be an excellent gateway to content that offers a deeper dive into a subject.

Animation as Visual Content Marketing

For most marketers, and in most situations, animation is the most expensive option for visual content marketing. So unless you have an animator on your team, you’ll likely reserve it for only the most crucial marketing messages or those situations where you’re confident you can make a big splash. Animation excels at explaining complex processes clearly, particularly mechanical and industrial processes where it’s what’s going on inside the machines that is of interest and a real-world exploded view just isn’t possible.

Unlike video, where audiences are likely to be more forgiving of lower production values, audiences tend to be less forgiving of bad animation. Think of the groans you’ve stifled when looking at poorly executed “animation” effects in Powerpoint and other presentation tools.

Charts and Graphs

Charts and graphs are the bread and butter of your visual content marketing arsenal. They can be incredibly quick to produce if you have basic spreadsheet or presentation tool skills and can relatively quickly be dressed up by even less experienced graphic artists. Use these liberally and build them with an eye toward social media use and email embedding. They can be a real game changer assuming you have some interesting data to present.

Conceptual Imagery

Think of every television commercial or print ad that has made you say, “What does ________ have to do with selling ________?” That’s conceptual imagery.

Floating Lotus Flower

You can insert just about anything into those blanks and wind up with something very close to a recent real-life example:

What does a field of wildflowers have to do with selling prescription drugs?

What does an impossibly diverse and hip-looking group of people have to do with selling computers?

The answer to those questions, and questions like them in advertising for everything from cars to cloud services to consulting firms: Emotion matters.

If you can make use of it, you should, though you really have to feel that your design team is up to the task and your marketing team can guide them appropriately. It’s far easier to wind up looking amateurish here than with just about any other type of visual we’ve discussed.

Your audience doesn’t necessarily have the same expectations of a small tax consultancy, say, as it does of a national consumer brand, and they also won’t expect the same production values in a product-specific explainer video as they do for a commercial during the big game. But because conceptual imagery is nearly entirely an emotional appeal, the terrain is less forgiving and you really do need to be sure your content marketing message is connecting emotionally.

That’s no reason not to make your content more visual. You may want to begin with baby steps and test efforts you’re unsure of in front of smaller groups from whom you can get feedback and guidance. They will let you know whether you’re staying true to your brand promise and whether your visuals are a distraction or, as we hope, an element that further strengthens your content marketing message.

Why the Heineken Video Went Viral

Why is online content shared? To build one’s social standing? Or develop the sharer’s self-image? Those and related questions were answered last week in “10 Ingredients for Your Video to Go Viral” for the All About Direct Marketing Virtual Conference and Expo. I mentioned the recent Heineken viral video “Worlds Apart.” So today, here are a few reasons why.

How Heineken Went ViralWhy is online content shared? To build one’s social standing? Or develop the sharer’s self-image? Those and related questions were answered last week in “10 Ingredients for Your Video to Go Viral” for the All About Direct Marketing Virtual Conference and Expo. I mentioned the recent Heineken viral video “Worlds Apart.” So today, here are a few reasons why.

If you missed 10 Ingredients for Your Video to Go Viral last week, you can still watch and listen to it here.

Participants during my session posed some questions about making successful videos. Here is the Q&A, including my thoughts about the Heineken video.

How Do You Find Out What Your Customers Want to See if You Offer a Service?

Whether you offer a service or product, the obvious answer might be to ask your customers. But I’d actually suggest that your customers may prefer to be surprised. That is, avoid the obvious and consider the obscure presentation that no one thought to ask about.

Think about how you can use the news or headlines to create a story. Or perhaps there is an attitude or temperament you want to tap into. The Heineken Worlds Apart video, released on April 20, has had over 11 million views so far. They don’t sell beer. Rather, it’s a commentary about our culture, and that while some people may be worlds apart, they can agree to disagree, and perhaps even soften barriers over a beer. It’s a brilliant video, and at over 4 minutes in length, delivers a strong message that surely strengthens their brand. By the way, this illustrates that under-two-minute videos aren’t the only way to command views.

https://youtu.be/8wYXw4K0A3g

Behind-the-scenes can always be a pleasant surprise. Show how your product is made — or how it is used, out in the wild. Gather testimonials and let the word-of-mouth tell your story in an unexpected way.

If you’re a non-profit, show the outcomes — with real stories — of what you provide, and make sure it’s an emotional tug.

Is an Informal Video Stronger Than a Professional Scripted Video?

Sometimes. It really depends. The Heineken video doesn’t appear to have been scripted, but rather, a lot of footage was shot and it was edited down to create a compelling story that a lot of people have viewed, and perhaps embraced. More important that the video quality is the audio quality. Social media users forgive shaky smartphone videos, but if they can’t discern the audio or if there is distracting, loud background noise, they may not stay with it.

So Green Screen Videos Are Out?

A lot of interesting graphics and text can be used if you have a talking head on video and recorded in front of a green screen. People want to connect emotionally with interesting people, so I would suggest you need the right person to be on camera if you’re shooting in front of a green screen. Also, a green screen allows for simple, controlled, limited lighting in a confined area. In editing, you have options around the environment the speaker is in—and it can change during the video.

5 Ideas for Creative Facebook Videos

Who doesn’t like a great video? YouTube knows this better than anyone. From babies to cats, amazing physical feats to how to put on makeup, everyone seems to be seeking out and watching these videos.

facebookcover Patrick blogWho doesn’t like a great video? YouTube knows this better than anyone. From babies to cats, amazing physical feats to how to put on makeup, everyone seems to be seeking out and watching these videos.

Now Facebook has grabbed onto the video idea, but in a different manner — in your News Feed. So even if you are not looking, you’ll see video from your friends, advertisers and news outlets. And what’s really cool is they start to play when you get near them … but without sound. Then simply click on the video to hear the sound.

Most likely, you know this already. The question is have you USED video yet? Have you uploaded any videos? Do you have any to upload? This leads to random idea No. 1 …

1. Create a Video From Pictures

Okay, we’re not all videographers. Nor do we know a videographer. Or maybe can’t quite afford one now. So how can you take advantage of video on Facebook? Use a slide show!

Creating a video slide show is very simple. Choose “Share a photo or video” when you go to your page. Then choose “Create Slideshow” and have three to 10 photos ready for upload. Just remember one thing: They will be automatically cropped to a video size and proportion.

Next, you’ll choose the duration each photo stays on screen and if you want them to fade or cut from picture to picture. You can also rearrange the order of photos, too.

The last step: Add music. You can choose from selections Facebook has or upload your own. (Just remember, you must have rights to any music. No uploading your favorite Stones, Sting or Ed Sheeran songs.) The good news is there’s lots of “rights-free” music on the Internet.

Then all you do is hit “Create Video” and once it’s ready, Facebook emails you. Viola! You now have a video on Facebook.

You can use this for products, real estate, entertainment or just about anything where up to 10 photos will get your message across.

facebookslideshowvideo Patrick's post

This slideshow video created for Sleep Woodstock Motel was made from 10 photos and a Facebook music selection
This slideshow video created for Sleep Woodstock Motel was made from 10 photos and a Facebook music selection

2.  Add Text to the Beginning of Your Video

Wait, it’s a video. Why would I want to add text to it? The simple answer is there’s no sound unless someone clicks on the video. If you want them to get your message right from the start, add text. This could be the difference between zooming past it or actually clicking on it.

Camtasia used text in its video very effectively below.

camtasiawithcta Patrick post

3.  Use CTAs IN Newsfeed Videos

Make sure to add a call to action (CTA) to your Facebook video. Make it easy for the viewer by taking them to a Web page where they can learn more, watch more or even buy.

Examples for the CTAs include: Book Now, Learn More, Sign Up, Download, Watch More, Shop Now and as the MasterCard video below uses very effectively, Apply Now. Choose your CTA wisely as your selection can help or hurt your engagement and clickthrough rates.

mastercardblackcard_cta

4. Use the Cover Image ‘Watch Video’ CTA

Your cover image can become a powerful tool to feature a video. If you’re introducing a new product, promoting an upcoming event or featuring a new service, the Facebook CTA button on your cover image brings powerful attention to a video hosted on a micro-page or website.

HGTV teamed up with Ellen for a design challenge. The cover image CTA button takes viewers to the video on their website.

ellen-call-to-action-button

What Marketers Are Buying in 2017

If you’re looking at what investments to make this year, or trying to convince your colleagues to put the company’s money where your mouth is, take a look at the chart below to find out where other marketers are putting theirs.

Along side the media usage survey we released in the January/February issue of Target Marketing, NAPCO Media Research head Nathan Safran recently surveyed marketers on one very simple question: Which technologies, solutions and services will your company be investing in for 2017?

The answers weren’t necessarily surprising, but they do give a simple, yes/no indication for where marketers are putting their money.

First of all, a majority of responses said they plan to buy tech for email and social media marketing. So over 50 percent of marketers surveyed still feel a need to make investments to unlock the full potential of those channels.

Not far behind those, in the 40 to 50 percent range, marketers are investing in content marketing, video marketing, Web analytics and direct mail solutions.

We’re also seeing a lot of respondents who plan to invest in the bedrock marketing tools of CRM. Marketing automation, databases and mobile tech.

So, if you’re looking at what investments to make this year, or trying to convince your colleagues to put the company’s money where your mouth is, take a look at the chart below to find out where other marketers are putting theirs.

TM Plan to Buy Chart

All Aboard the USS Sass-A-Lot

“Good morning, marketers!” If you watch my weekly videos on Friday, that’s usually how I greet you … it’s a pleasant enough way to kick off the video, and a nod to two of my favorite YouTubers — Hank and John Green of the Vlogbrothers. Speaking of which … I have some fun news to announce!

“Good morning, marketers!” If you watch my weekly videos on Friday, that’s usually how I greet you … it’s a pleasant enough way to kick off the video, and a nod to two of my favorite YouTubers — Hank and John Green of the Vlogbrothers.

Two years ago, if you asked me to pitch a video idea, I would shift uncomfortably in my seat and wonder, “What the hell do I have to say about marketing that someone will actually care about?” I would come up with something, deliver the idea clearly on camera, but with the passion of a garden snail.

And it wasn’t for a lack of caring … but I was pushing myself to cover things I thought were fairly important to our audience, and not something I was always interested in. Because that’s how having a job works … right?

No.

Fast forward to May 2016: “What Were They Thinking” is pitched, and in two weeks we go from concept to first video (thanks to an awesome team who stepped up to make it a reality). Now, it wasn’t my best video, but Taylor and I were learning on our feet. And honestly, she’s been nailing it on Every.Single.Video. The girl’s got skills. I’m the weirdo who had to figure out how to tweak my presentation to fit who I wanted to be on camera.

Fast forward, again, to now: I’ve figured out my voice, we’ve managed to film videos that clock in around 3 minutes consistently, and we’ve received a bit of recognition around the office for our work. Oh, and we just launched a channel on YouTube.

That's Great!Yes that’s right friends … we heard you. I had SO MANY people ask me what my YouTube channel was, and I usually had to fumble around with how I wasn’t on THE video platform (and search engine, mind you). But I talked to our team, we came up with a plan, and well, there I am.

Of the 34 videos we’ve filmed since June 3, there are 28 up on YouTube, priming the pump, so to say. And don’t worry, “What Were They Thinking?” will always be available on our site first, shared in the Friday morning e-newsletter and our social channels. The inclusion of YouTube is to address the needs of some current audience members, as well as to grow another audience of sassy marketing nerds.

I came across this quote from Kevin Spacey, and I found it fitting:

For kids growing up now, there’s no difference watching “Avatar” on an iPad or watching YouTube on TV or watching “Game of Thrones” on their computer. It’s all content. It’s just story.

Okay, so I know most of you aren’t kids, and trust me, I am not comparing my videos to “Game of Thrones” … but Spacey is right. It’s all just story, and I’m excited to share marketing stories in a new space.

Sass-A-LotIf YouTube is your jam, check out the Sass Marketing channel, subscribe and see the weekly “What Were They Thinking?” video pop up on Monday mornings! Otherwise, I’ll see you all on Friday!

Special thanks to John Gelety for sharing Phil Hartman’s “Sassy” sketch with me. I just couldn’t NOT include it. (Also John, I’m still waiting on that “Sassy” sign … juuuuuust sayin’.)