WWTT? Leap Day Fund From Stella Artois Promotes ‘Uncancelled’ Plans

Everyone does it: After a long day of work, household obligations, and more, the idea of cancelling plans to go out becomes absolute bliss. But for 2020, a year with a Leap Day, Stella Artois urged people to “uncancel” their plans for once and put the extra 24 hours to good use, supported by a Leap Day Fund.

Everyone does it: After a long day of work, household obligations, and more, the idea of cancelling plans to go out — and instead stay in with takeout, a movie or a good book, and your pajamas — becomes absolute bliss. Even more tempting when the weather is miserable out. But every cancelled plan is time lost with someone … and time is one thing that is impossible to get back once it’s gone. So for 2020, a year with a Leap Day, Stella Artois urged people to “uncancel” their plans for once and put the extra 24 hours to good use. To sweeten the deal, the Anheuser-Busch beer brand created a Leap Day Fund, and produced a short video to support the campaign.

The Leap Day Fund totals $366,000, to align with the 366 days in a Leap Year — and while the short film dramatizes the idea of receiving a reduced restaurant bill, the actual Leap Day Fund promotion functions a bit differently (but with the same focus of getting people to spend time together over a beer).

According to the Leap Day Fund promotion’s terms and conditions, consumers 21-plus can claim a portion of the fund to cover their Stella Artois purchase (up to a 24-pack) by sharing the film using the hashtag #UnCancelPromo and tagging someone else 21-plus they wanted to spend Leap Day with. Participants also needed to  be following @StellaArtois  on Twitter and/or Facebook, as well as make the beer purchase during the Leap Day period, defined as Feb. 26- Feb. 29.

Stella Artois even made it extremely easy (at least on Twitter) to take part in the promotion via the “Tweet #UnCancelPromo” as seen below:

WWTT? Stella Artois's Leap Day Fund Urges People 'Uncancel' Plans
Hit the button and your Twitter account is activated with a pre-filled tweet … you just need to tag someone!

Beyond the video and social media components, Stella Artois also had digital out-of-home ad (OOH) placements installed in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, and New York. These included  a QR code leading to the Leap Day film, along with a countdown reminding consumers to take advantage of the extra time on Leap Day to make plans and tap into the Leap Day Fund.

To be clear, this is a rebate promotion, and participants have until March 14 to submit their redemption, so while Leap Day has come and gone, sales numbers are not in yet.

I like that this campaign really puts for the idea of spending time together with the people you care about (and drinking). It reminds me a bit of Chik-Fil-A’s gift of time holiday promotion last year, just a little less family-oriented (unless that family is 21-plus, of course).

Centering it around Leap Day is clever, especially since it’s the kind of campaign you’ll only see every four years. But what do you think about the Stella Artois’s Leap Day Fund? Drop me a line in the comments!

 

WWTT? Super Bowl Ad Illustrates Snickers’ Plan to Fix the World

This year, Feb. 2 wasn’t just Groundhog Day — it was also Super Bowl LIV. With the cost of a 30-second Super Bowl ad clocking in at $5.6 million, stakes were high, as usual, and ads ran the gamut from quirky to nostalgic, with some political and heart string-pulling ads debuted as well.

This year, Feb. 2 wasn’t just Groundhog Day — it was also Super Bowl LIV, and while we did get to see the furry critter and Bill Murray team up again in a Jeep ad, there was more than cute rodents and amusing gimmicks during the Big Game’s commercials. With the cost of a 30-second Super Bowl ad clocking in at $5.6 million, stakes were high, as usual, and ads ran the gamut from quirky to nostalgic, with some political and heart string-pulling ads debuted as well.

One of the standout Super Bowl ads of the evening was Snickers’ and BBDO’s “#SnickersFixTheWorld” campaign, which illustrates how the candy maker plans to fix the world. The ad, which loosely spoofs Coca-Cola’s 1971 “Hilltop” commercial (you know the one, where you’d “like to buy the world a Coke, and keep it company.”) provided its own weird twist on a community coming together and singing.

https://youtu.be/SLAV4LYO-yU

“SnickersFixtheWorld,” which launched with a 30-second version as its Super Bowl ad, is the latest evolution of  Snickers’ award-winning “You’re Not You When You’re Hungry” campaign. And considering the number of challenges faced globally today, ranging from the Coronavirus to climate change, immigration issues and presidential impeachment, the idea of using chocolate to calm down the world does offer some comic relief. If only it was that easy.

Snickers Brand Director Josh Olken commented:

“Since the first Super Bowl spot 10 years ago, we’ve shown the power of Snickers to satisfy when you’re out of sorts. Our attempt to ‘fix the world’ is a new angle, and our biggest yet: When the world itself is out of sorts, maybe it just needs a Snickers.”

The Super Bowl ad , while maybe not as quirky as others (I’m looking at you, Bryan Cranston and Mountain Dew), definitely resonated with other advertising professionals, especially Super Clio jurors who selected the Snickers ad as the Super Clio winner for 2020.

Super Clio juror Jaime Robinson, Co-Founder & CCO of Joan Creative commented:

“It was a lively and engaging discussion and we talked at length about idea, execution, and the very specific media event that is the Super Bowl. In the end, we loved Snickers for being so in-tune with the world as it is right now, for being a fresh idea that re-frames a longstanding campaign, and for having a really, really good laugh at the overly earnest ads of recent Super Bowls past. It seems sadvertising’s reign might just be coming to an end.”

But for Snickers, its Super Bowl ad was just the beginning. Following the Kansas City Chief’s win, Snickers placed the following print ad in the Kansas City Star, cheekily taking credit for the team’s first Super Bowl win in 50 years:

Snickers ad in Kansas City Star
Credit: Snickers/BBDO

Shifting from #SnickersFixtheWorld” to #SnickersFixedtheWorld, the brand has created two 15-second spots showcasing how throwing a huge Snickers into a hole in the earth has begun to fix things. Titled “Chancellor” and “Online Date,” both shorts feature actor Luis Guzman giving credit to Snickers for the wins.

https://youtu.be/iSigOPo1v00

It will be interesting to see where else Snickers takes the #SnickersFixtheWorld” campaign — what other issues the candy maker will tackle, and what channels the campaign will spread to.

What do you think marketers? Did Snickers deserve the Super Clio, or was there a more worthy Super Bowl ad? Let me know in the comments below.

WWTT? Planters Kills Off Mr. Peanut in Viral Marketing Effort Ahead of the Super Bowl

Mr. Peanut survived two World Wars, as well as the white-mold rot crisis of 2012, but at the age of 104 his time had come. Or maybe his death is a hoax. Either way you try to shell this nut, it’s clear that Planters has opted to invest in a viral marketing effort ahead of its Super Bowl ad debut on Feb. 2.

[Update, Jan. 27: Planters announced that following the news of Kobe Bryant’s death on Jan. 26. the company would be pausing the current promotion of the death or Mr. Peanut campaign, however that ad and the “funeral” ad spot are still scheduled to air during the Super Bowl.]

Dearly beloved, we’re gathered here this day to mourn the untimely death of everyone’s favorite dapper legume, Mr. Peanut. Donning his monocle and jaunty hat in 1916, Mr. Peanut survived two World Wars, as well as the white-mold rot crisis of 2012, but at the age of 104 his time had come. Or maybe his death is a hoax, as some would believe. Either way you try to shell this nut, it’s clear that Planters has opted to invest in a viral marketing effort ahead of its Super Bowl third quarter ad appearance on Feb. 2.

On Jan. 22, Planters announced the death of its mascot via social media, which resulted in an outpouring of responses from both brands and consumers alike:

With brands like those above, as well as Toyota, Shake Shack, Kraft Macaroni & Cheese, Chips Ahoy, and more “mourning” the loss of the nutty icon, Planters followed up on social media with a Super Bowl teaser ad, showcasing just how Mr. Peanut met his untimely demise:

Samantha Hess, brand manager for Planters, said in a statement:

“It’s with heavy hearts that we confirm Mr. Peanut has passed away at 104 years old. He will be remembered as the legume who always brought people together for nutty adventures and a good time. We encourage fans to tune in to Mr. Peanut’s funeral during the third quarter of the Super Bowl to celebrate his life.”

I suppose turning a Super Bowl ad into a funeral for Mr. Peanut is both 1. a fairly unique use of advertising dollars; 2. one way to get people to start talking about the ad before they watch it; and 3. a good opportunity to either surprise viewers (he was never dead!) or launch a new branding initiative.

That said, while supposedly “killing off” an iconic mascot (remember, we didn’t see the body) is quite the branding switch-up, there is no question that this well-timed stunt is the epitome of viral marketing. Just take a look at this Google Trends chart for starters:

Google Trends chart showing the effectiveness of Planter's viral marketing campaign surrounding the death of Mr. Peanut

Mentions about Mr. Peanut (and thus Planters) have jumped significantly due to the viral marketing effort. A Google search for “Mr. Peanut” netted 107 million results Thursday afternoon, showing me media coverage about the anthropomorphized legume’s death from CNN, Deadline, New York Post, Sports Illustrated, AdWeek, Forbes and more.

So sure, people are talking about Mr. Peanut, but does that translate into anything more meaningful than talk? The campaign’s reach was thoroughly amplified, especially due to the #RIPeanut hashtag, but what does going viral mean for Planters?

I think Jason Aten’s article “Yes, Mr. Peanut Is Dead. But Old-School Advertising Is Even Deader” makes an important point about the viral marketing campaign. Referencing Oreo’s tweet during a power outage during Super Bowl XLVII and Arby’s hat tweet during the 2014 Grammy’s, Aten writes:

But the beauty of those tweets was that they happened in reaction to real-world events. That isn’t the case with Mr. Peanut. In fact, there’s literally nothing more manufactured than a pre-planned marketing campaign featuring a tweet announcing the death of a made-up brand character just to generate buzz for a pretend funeral for said character.

Think about the creative meeting for this: Some social media-savvy account manager pitched the idea that this tired mascot really needed to be permanently retired. And, desperate to attract the attention of salty-snack-craving Millennials, the company agreed.

Aten hits the nail on the head: While we can all laugh at the ridiculous responses from other brands to the the social media announcement of the death of a brand mascot, what purpose does this campaign really serve? Mr. Peanut is not a real person, and is this use of social media even real marketing? You tell me.

And, for anyone interested in a little conspiracy theory regarding the death of the mascot, check out this Jan. 14 Facebook post from the Mr. Peanut account … “dying to hit the road”? Talk about some foreshadowing.

Because it’s Friday and we probably could all use a giggle, I will share with you one last Twitter thread:

Pop Tarts responds to Planter's viral marketing effort regarding the death of Mr. Peanut

 

WWTT? Walmart Learns Important Lesson About Third-Party Sellers This Holiday Season

I’m not sure when Ugly Christmas Sweaters became a thing, but they seem to show up regularly each holiday season, spurred by Ugly Christmas Sweater parties and people who enjoy making poor fashion decisions. However, it seems this trend has gone awry for Walmart Canada.

I’m not sure when Ugly Christmas Sweaters became a thing, but they seem to show up regularly each holiday season, spurred by Ugly Christmas Sweater parties and  people who enjoy making poor fashion decisions. However, it seems that what used to be ironic sweater-wearing has turned into shock-value sweater-wearing for some individuals, and there are sellers out there who will gladly cash in on that trend. And so we have the recent problem that Walmart Canada faced when a number of highly inappropriate Ugly Christmas Sweaters were made available for purchase on walmart.ca by one of the third-party sellers, Fun Wear, that sells its merchandise on the site.

The sweater that has caused the most uproar features a bug-eyed Santa Claus in front of a table with three lines of a white substance, with the words “Let It Snow” below. Okay, so not great. But then it gets way worse.

https://twitter.com/HurrbaSousJohn/status/1203353309396029440?

Unfortunately for Walmart, this is more than an embarrassment for selling something tacky and enduring some snickering from the Internet. The product description, partially seen in the tweet above, is particularly problematic:

“We all know how snow works. It’s white, powdery and the best snow comes straight from South America. That’s bad news for jolly old St. Nick, who lives far away in the North Pole. That’s why Santa really likes to savor the moment when he gets his hands on some quality, grade A, Colombian snow. He packs it in perfect lines on his coffee table and then takes a big whiff to smell the high quality aroma of the snow. It’s exactly what he needs to get inspired for Christmas Eve.”

On Saturday, Dec. 7, Walmart Canada removed the product, and issued an apology. A spokesperson provided the following quote to Business Insider:

“These sweaters, sold by a third-party seller on Walmart.ca (our website in Canada), do not represent Walmart’s values and have no place on our website. We have removed these products from our marketplace. We apologize for any unintended offense this may have caused. These sweaters were not offered on Walmart.com in the US.”

Despite the removal of the product and the apology, the reference of “Colombian snow” has the National Agency for the Legal Defense of the State in Colombia prepared to sue. According to the Washington Post and El Tiempo, on Dec. 10 the agency stated that Walmart’s apology about the product from a third-party seller on Walmart.ca was not enough. Agency director Camilo Gómez Alzate provided this statement to El Tiempo, reported by the Washington Post:

“The Walmart sweater is an offense to the country. It generates damage to the legal products of Colombia and damage to the country’s reputation. Although Walmart apologized, the damage was done.”

So the lesson to be learned here: third-party sellers may expand the amount of business you do and the revenue you pull in, but you can’t always trust that their products will be in line with your company’s values. This was not the only Ugly Christmas Sweater that Fun Wear had up on Walmart Canada’s site … and the majority of them were in rather poor taste.

While Walmart may have policies in place to limit undesirable products from third-party sellers, it’s clear these policies are either difficult to enforce or they’re not being enforced. The consequence of losing customers over this is one thing, but having Colombia’s National Agency for the Legal Defense of the State sue if appropriate reparations aren’t made is an even bigger problem for the retailer.

What do you think marketers? Is it worth it to have third-party sellers offer their products on your sites, checked or unchecked, or are issues like this enough of a reason to avoid third-party relationships? Oh, and yes, Amazon is selling products with similar and identical designs.

 

WWTT? Budweiser Shares Spooky Mugshots in ‘Drink Wiser’ Campaign

In celebration of the spooky season, Budweiser put a Halloween spin on its “Drink Wiser” campaign, enlisting the help of those who know how much it sucks to be arrested for irresponsible drinking.

Halloween isn’t just for trick-or-treaters, however it seems that many of the “treats” for adult revelers often involve bars, parties, and alcohol, and thus many of the tricks can be less than amusing … especially when drinking and driving are combined. So in celebration of the spooky season, Budweiser put a Halloween spin on its “Drink Wiser” campaign, enlisting the help of those who know how much it sucks to be arrested for irresponsible drinking.

The Drink Wiser campaign kicked off originally in 2018, taking on the topic of binge-drinking and alcohol-impaired driving. In the original effort, Budweiser promoted the importance of hydrating in-between beers, as well as planning ahead regarding safe transportation options home.

For Halloween, Budweiser continued to promote the same efforts, but with a season-appropriate twist for its social media and digital out-of-home (OOH) visuals: The macrobrewer worked with actual individuals who were arrested for irresponsible drinking during Halloween seasons of the past.

Budweiser 'Drink Wiser' Campaign
Credit: Budweiser

While these aren’t the actual mug shots of Sharyn W., Cesar O., or Ameneh K., Budweiser opted to re-imagine these three individuals in Halloween costumes that had clearly seen better days. With the tagline of “Don’t Let Halloween Haunt You Forever,” the campaign’s digital OOH ads will be present in Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia.

For the social component of the campaign, Budweiser has advised fans to follow it on Twitter, @BudweiserUSA, as well as turn on tweet notifications to receive reminders to drink responsibly and hydrate with water between beers.

According to an Anheuser-Busch (parent company of Budweiser) press release, Budweiser has been involved in cause marketing for over a century. “Budweiser Means Moderation” was the brewer’s first responsible drinking message — dating back to over a 100 years ago — and its first responsible drinking campaign “Know When to Say When” debuted over 35 years ago.

Halloween can be quite the party holiday for many, and it’s smart of Budweiser to come out ahead of it, reminding people to consume its products responsibly. The Halloween costume-themed mug shots are a great visual to use, and hopefully have people thinking twice about drinking and driving.

We see a lot of campaigns that — rightly so — show just how horrible drinking and driving can be for all involved. But I appreciate that Budweiser mixed humor and shame together to get the point across about irresponsible drinking this Halloween.

All Aboard the USS Sass-A-Lot

“Good morning, marketers!” If you watch my weekly videos on Friday, that’s usually how I greet you … it’s a pleasant enough way to kick off the video, and a nod to two of my favorite YouTubers — Hank and John Green of the Vlogbrothers. Speaking of which … I have some fun news to announce!

“Good morning, marketers!” If you watch my weekly videos on Friday, that’s usually how I greet you … it’s a pleasant enough way to kick off the video, and a nod to two of my favorite YouTubers — Hank and John Green of the Vlogbrothers.

Two years ago, if you asked me to pitch a video idea, I would shift uncomfortably in my seat and wonder, “What the hell do I have to say about marketing that someone will actually care about?” I would come up with something, deliver the idea clearly on camera, but with the passion of a garden snail.

And it wasn’t for a lack of caring … but I was pushing myself to cover things I thought were fairly important to our audience, and not something I was always interested in. Because that’s how having a job works … right?

No.

Fast forward to May 2016: “What Were They Thinking” is pitched, and in two weeks we go from concept to first video (thanks to an awesome team who stepped up to make it a reality). Now, it wasn’t my best video, but Taylor and I were learning on our feet. And honestly, she’s been nailing it on Every.Single.Video. The girl’s got skills. I’m the weirdo who had to figure out how to tweak my presentation to fit who I wanted to be on camera.

Fast forward, again, to now: I’ve figured out my voice, we’ve managed to film videos that clock in around 3 minutes consistently, and we’ve received a bit of recognition around the office for our work. Oh, and we just launched a channel on YouTube.

That's Great!Yes that’s right friends … we heard you. I had SO MANY people ask me what my YouTube channel was, and I usually had to fumble around with how I wasn’t on THE video platform (and search engine, mind you). But I talked to our team, we came up with a plan, and well, there I am.

Of the 34 videos we’ve filmed since June 3, there are 28 up on YouTube, priming the pump, so to say. And don’t worry, “What Were They Thinking?” will always be available on our site first, shared in the Friday morning e-newsletter and our social channels. The inclusion of YouTube is to address the needs of some current audience members, as well as to grow another audience of sassy marketing nerds.

I came across this quote from Kevin Spacey, and I found it fitting:

For kids growing up now, there’s no difference watching “Avatar” on an iPad or watching YouTube on TV or watching “Game of Thrones” on their computer. It’s all content. It’s just story.

Okay, so I know most of you aren’t kids, and trust me, I am not comparing my videos to “Game of Thrones” … but Spacey is right. It’s all just story, and I’m excited to share marketing stories in a new space.

Sass-A-LotIf YouTube is your jam, check out the Sass Marketing channel, subscribe and see the weekly “What Were They Thinking?” video pop up on Monday mornings! Otherwise, I’ll see you all on Friday!

Special thanks to John Gelety for sharing Phil Hartman’s “Sassy” sketch with me. I just couldn’t NOT include it. (Also John, I’m still waiting on that “Sassy” sign … juuuuuust sayin’.)

Listen to Tyler Oakley: Dare to Be You

During this year’s &THEN event in LA I got to see Tyler Oakley — one of my video inspirations — speak and explain the intimate connection viewers and vloggers can have, especially when the video maker makes regular lasting connections with their audience. But you don’t have to be a YouTube star to do this!

This past week I was in LA with some of the Target Marketing team for DMA’s &THEN conference and wow … it was a whirlwind 3 days.

Not-so-fresh off my red eye flight, I have several blog posts started and even more notes to shape up, but what I want to share with you this week is a realization I had during the Tuesday morning inspirational keynote featuring Beau Avril of Google Preferred, Dan Weinstein of Collective Digital Studio, and Tyler Oakley, Youtube personality, author, and activist.

When introducing Tyler, they showed this quick clip about #DaretoBeYou, which he launched in late 2015:

And that’s when it hit me:

Tyler Oakley Dare to be YouDuring the keynote, titled “The New Face of Creativity,” Tyler made an interesting point about YouTube videos and vloggers in general. He explained that the level of intimacy between viewers and the YouTubers/vloggers is heightened because it’s them watching on a screen, usually closer to the body than a TV or movie screen.

Tyler likened it to Facetiming, and explained how many viewers consider YouTube personalities to be like friends — they share personal stories and make connections.

But you don’t have to be a YouTube personality to do this.

Since launching Sass Marketing a little over a year ago and “What Were They Thinking?” less than five months ago, you’ve tuned in, watched and hopefully laughed at my antics. Or maybe shook your fist at your screen when I said something you didn’t agree with.

My favorite reaction, though, is when you take the time to leave a comment, write me an email or share a tweet telling me exactly what you think of this series.

Or in the case of this past week, came up to me during &THEN and simply said, “I love your videos.”

This reminds me that I made the right decision to be myself — loud, sassy with eyerolls to spare — or as Tyler says, “dare to be you.” Sass Marketing/What Were They Thinking isn’t just an act I put on … it’s me, and it’s more myself than some of the work I’ve done in the past, but that’s partly because I was still finding who I am in all of this.

I’m fortunate that I have this space in the marketing world to do this, the support from my colleagues and mostly importantly, you.

Tyler Oakley You Dare to Be YouI’ll continue to dare to be me in order to delight you and make you laugh, but I need you to dare to be you. A world of people being their genuine, true selves is a world of beauty and limitless possibility.

 

‘What I Did on Summer Vacation …’

Happy Day After Labor Day folks! Hope you got all your barbecuing done this weekend, because now it’s back to school, back to reality and back to work. Summer hours are a thing of the past, but before you stow your flip flops, here are some of my favorite things I’ve worked on during the Summer of 2016.

Happy Day After Labor Day folks! Hope you got all your barbecuing done this weekend, because now it’s back to school, back to reality and back to work. Summer hours are a thing of the past, but before you stow your flip flops, here are some of my favorite things I’ve worked on during the Summer of 2016:

Amtrak WWTT videoA Weekly Whacky Video Series

From KFC to  Zappos’ #ImNotABox, from McDonald’s to T-Rex chatbots … this has been a busy summer of video for me. I launched “What Were They Thinking?” with our associate content editor Taylor Knight on June 3, and we have created 14 videos together (actually 16, since we did some extra work to get ahead when possible). It seems as though our audience gets a kick out them, which was my goal: to entertain while shedding some light on the good, the bad and the utterly confusing things in marketing. This past week we shot a video based on my first viewer suggestion, which was awesome to receive, and great fun to put together.

Compelling Content MemeRobert Rose Dropping Serious CM Knowledge on the TM Audience

I met Robert at the 2015 Content Marketing World (2016 CMW is going on right now, and I sadly can’t be there due to a MASSIVE client project, so ALL my content love to the some of the hardest working folks in Cleveland!) and got to see him speak multiple times throughout the event. Following that, I caught a number of his webinars and podcasts, and knew that the opportunity to work with him myself was high on my 2016 to-do list. Well, during this past June’s Intergrated Marketing Virtual Conference, I did just that, moderating his session, “The Content Show That Never Ends: Repurposing Like a Media Company.” Not only did I get to use song lyrics from Emerson, Lake and Palmer in my intro of this wonderfully smart dude, but he broke down repurposing content in a way I hadn’t thought of before. The virtual show is still available on-demand, but only through Sept. 27, so register and CHECK IT OUT!

Snapchat fear memeInsta Stories Being Easy Like Whoa

I know, I know … I shot a video back in the spring about how whoo-hoo, look how easy Snapchat is! I created an account for Sass Marketing … and then barely did anything with it because it was such a headache. Then Instagram Stories came along, I rolled my eyes, but then sat down and wrote a Pros and Cons list about the newest Insta feature (you know, an app I use CONSTANTLY) and decided, okay … maybe this could work for me. Then Taylor shot this fantastic video breaking it all down, and well, I highly recommend watching it:

[brightcove videoplayer=”5090556995001″ playerid=”4057790005001″ playerkey=”AQ~~,AAAB3F0Fgjk~,iLMUk1o09xryy1Ypo80LdwzRrrPX3phQ” width=”480″ height=”270″ autostart=”false”]

I got access to Instagram Stories in mid-August, and I have to say, I’m a fan … personally and professionally … which leads me to this:

Sass Marketing Facebook PageThere’s More Sass on Social!

That’s right … there’s now 200 percent more sass out there on the interwebs (I think … math and I don’t get along). I launched a Facebook Page AND an Instagram account in August because I didn’t want to keep hijacking our brand accounts. So find me in both those spots to get behind the scenes photos and videos from my “What Were They Thinking?” shoots, random photos of my desk and whatever other antics I get up to.

What fun things did you work on this summer? Tell me all about it in the comments!

The Past Is More Than Dinosaur Bones

The past is important to examine … wait, scratch that, it’s crucial to examine, and I’d venture to say hubris if you do not. No crystal ball is needed; instead you can look at what has been done and make informed decisions based on the successes and failures of others.

I was in Upstate New York this past weekend for my cousin’s wedding, and fairly off the grid. So, suffice to say, I was pretty surprised to check my Twitter notifications Monday night and see this as I drove home to Philly after the long weekend:

Wait, me? Wilde Agency is referring to me? And my videos?

Fangirling gifSo then I jumped into the conversation.

Tweets with Wilde AgencyMore tweets with Wilde AgencyYes, that’s right … I’ve already started filming some throwback videos, which will be peppered into the regular Friday rotation of What Were They Thinking? shenanigans. I think it’ll be a good time, and I plan to look at these campaigns the same way I look at present day ones, celebrating the fantastic and questioning the poorly done.

The past is important to examine … wait, scratch that, it’s crucial to examine, and I’d venture to say hubris if you do not. No crystal ball is needed; instead you can look at what has been done and make informed decisions based on the successes and failures of others.

And so I leave you with this motivational platitude this Tuesday, which is probably framed on the wall of some manager’s office, but it does ring true. And, of course, I made a little edit:

Smart people platitudeHave an idea for a What Were They Thinking? video? Leave a comment below OR drop me an email!!! If I use a suggestion, I’ll be sure to mention where it came from.

What Was I Thinking?!

How many times do you ask yourself that question? Or better yet, how many times have you asked, “What were they thinking?” From bad self tanners to questionable commercials for medications with horrible side effects (why do those always pop up during dinner? Why?!), there tends to be a lot of head shaking and eye rolling.

John Green pizza gif
John Green knows me too well.

How many times do you ask yourself that question?

Or better yet, how many times have you asked, “What were they thinking?” From bad self tanners to questionable commercials for medications with horrible side effects (why do those always pop up during dinner? Why?!), there tends to be a lot of head shaking and eye rolling.

Or at least that’s how it is at the House of Sass (aka, my desk).

So, on May 12, when a bunch of us discussed things like KFC’s edible nail polish and Budweiser’s America campaign, a thought came to me: Why not have these kinds of discussions regularly … and on video?

Our newest team member, Taylor Knight, is super skilled in the art of all things video — and hopefully you can tell that by some of the latest ones we’ve been posting. So with a video maven like Taylor on my team, a whole lotta opinions of my own and the blessings of a few others who seem to like my antics, the video series “What Were They Thinking?” was born.

We launched last Friday, with me taking a second crack at the KFC edible nail polish (because, yes, I am still annoyed by it).

[brightcove videoplayer=”4920630532001″ playerid=”4057790005001″ playerkey=”AQ~~,AAAB3F0Fgjk~,iLMUk1o09xryy1Ypo80LdwzRrrPX3phQ” width=”480″ height=”270″ autostart=”false”]

Now, this is not just a platform to holler about marketing I think is ridiculous (though I will do that from time to time). It’s about asking the question of “What were they thinking?” and exploring everything from the innovative to the truly bizarre.

No bad ideas gif
Naaaaaaah. We’ve got this.

Have an idea for something I should be covering? Email me, tweet at me @Sass_Marketing or leave a comment below!