Why Net Neutrality Is a Marketing Issue

The Net may soon have gate keepers, a price tag or a throttle — and that’s something we should all be concerned about. Marketers, in particular, should be paying attention and throwing their support behind Net Neutrality as both a concept and as a set of regulations because without those safeguards the critical connection points to consumers may be threatened.

“Rusty Lock” Creative Commons license | Credit: Flickr by webhamster

The Net may soon have gate keepers, a price tag or a throttle — and that’s something we should all be concerned about. Marketers, in particular, should be paying attention and throwing their support behind Net Neutrality as both a concept and as a set of regulations because without those safeguards the critical connection points to consumers may be threatened.

New online business models and innovations have thrived with the freedom of equal access officially protected first by the FCC in 2010 with the passage of the Open Internet Order. Many challenges and debates later, this order was expanded in 2015 in an effort to assure a level playing field.

The current administration’s FCC Chair, Ajit Pai, hopes to dismantle the regulations that allow smaller players to compete with huge ISPs like Comcast or Verizon that wield lobbying power and have deep, deep pockets and a big stake in the production and delivery of online content. This could happen before the year end and opens the door to scenarios that include the big ISPs blocking select content, slowing or speeding up select content or instituting pay walls for certain content.

It is easy to see how that may discourage access and innovation for new or smaller players or new offerings as the big power players will be free to throw obstacles in the path of contenders.

Especially now as video becomes ubiquitous as a critical marketing tactic and consumers use increasing bandwidth to stream content, this question needs to be asked: Will video advertising (in particular pre-roll) suffer from a tiered distribution model that forces some, but not all, to pay a premium to deliver that content? Will those consumers consigned to the slow lane stick around to see ads? Marketers may be forced to factor in delivery speed, access and other cost and optimization factors such that the ROI equations will differ based on who you are. This removes meritocracy and weights success not by the quality of your message or product/service but on whether you have the power to shift the odds in your favor.

To be fair, the world is not fair now. Large players already have advantages in cash, scale and access, but the removal of Net Neutrality would fundamentally weaken the very strengths that gave us so many innovations from Internet startups in the past two decades. It’s not a political issue, according to a variety of recent polls as citizens in both major parties overwhelmingly support Net Neutrality. It’s a potential abuse of power issue. Simple and scary.

Opponents of an Internet with fair and equal access cite a distaste for regulations and government interference; some even call it a solution in search of a problem. But the potential for abuse is huge and the impact will reverberate in our economy for decades if we allow power to corrupt the models that drive our fastest growing and most globally influential industries here in the US.

The likely result of the dismantling of the protections currently in place will be higher marketing costs, reduced access to consumers, diminished targeting and data capabilities and declining novelty in online ad offerings and services. That’s not the marketing advances we hope and work for. We can expect the void to be filled by other countries not operating under these adverse conditions for another blow to our global and economic position.

What to do, what to do? “The Internet-Wide Day of Action” online protest took place on July 12 this year and was broadly supported by nearly every company in the Internet game including Google, Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Yelp, Dropbox, Netflix, reddit and many others. But you don’t have to be a company to fight for equal access. Make your voice heard in online venues, on your website and with your representatives, sign the petition here at battleforthenet.com, or visit savetheinternet.com for more ideas.

How are you going to fight for equal access?

Who’s Talking About Me Behind My Back?

Celebrities are masters at constantly keeping their names in the spotlight. Whether on purpose (think Kim Kardashian) or not (think Justin Bieber), these brands are constantly vying for attention through every marketing channel available. While most large businesses have a cadre of resources constantly tracking and controlling their brand image, the nearly 28 million U.S. small businesses are not so lucky

Celebrities are masters at constantly keeping their names in the spotlight. Whether on purpose (think Kim Kardashian) or not (think Justin Bieber), these brands are constantly vying for attention through every marketing channel available.

While most large businesses have a cadre of resources constantly tracking and controlling their brand image, the nearly 28 million U.S. small businesses are not so lucky. From Facebook rants (distributed to a limited audience) to public floggings in a Yelp review, smaller businesses must be ever-mindful that, in the blink of an eye, a disgruntled customer can turn a less-than-stellar experience into a devastating business downturn.

That said, what can a smaller business do to better manage those voices in the marketplace?

  • Stop the rant before it starts: This seems obvious, but it’s too often overlooked. As soon as you encounter that disgruntled customer, offer to make it “right.” Sometimes that means suffering a financial loss on an order, but just remember these stats: The average American knows about 600 people, and the average number of friends of a Facebook user is 359. Each of those Facebook friends has 359 friends (on average), so the bad review/rant can be distributed very quickly across a vast network of people. One small loss to keep a customer happy isn’t worth the uncontrollable spread of bad publicity.
  • Understand the pesky truth about Yelp: Yelp receives hundreds of thousands of reviews each day, and uses filtering software to analyze and post those reviews that their software algorithm deems as most accurate. Their goal is to weed out the “fake” reviews and not include them in the overall rating of your business. However, if you carefully look at the bottom of your Yelp page, you’ll see how many additional reviews you’ve received noted as “(X other reviews that are not currently recommended)”, and if you click on that link, it will take you to your other reviews. In some instances you’ll see great reviews and other examples are terrible reviews. The reality is, Yelp aims to give publicly displayed reviews that best reflect what the software has analyzed to be “most accurate.” Realize that you can always add commentary to a bad review with an explanation of what you did to try and make it right with that customer.
  • Instantly monitor mentions of you on the web: Google has a nifty tool that allows you to monitor the internet (within Google’s database) for content that contains any keyword you want to monitor. So if I wanted to monitor my business (Goodman Marketing or Goodman Marketing Partners), Google Alerts sends me messages when those keywords appear on other websites or blogs. This allows you to respond to a positive review or address a negative review quickly. You can also monitor your competition (and take advantage of an issue!). The only requirement is that you have a gmail account.
  • Stimulate positive conversations about your business: This is the real benefit of engaging with social media. By posting interesting content on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram or constantly providing links to worthwhile content on LinkedIn and Twitter will help increase your legitimacy, value and “likes” in the marketplace. I try to post regularly to both LinkedIn and Twitter—not just about content that I’ve created, but to content that I think is valuable to others in my marketing sphere. Read and post comments on the blogs of others, respond to questions within LinkedIn Discussion Groups, and add value that can demonstrate your expertise. All these efforts will help improve the perception of you and your business in the minds of your audience.