Consumer Marketing in 2025

We can see a lot of ways commerce is changing today. Amazon and other e-commerce putting pressure on retail, customer experience trumping brand message, interaction moving to the Web and now moving to the mobile Web. But where is this all going? How is it going to look marketing to consumers in 2025 and beyond?

We can see a lot of ways commerce is changing today. Amazon and other e-commerce putting pressure on retail, customer experience trumping brand message, consumer interaction moving to the Web — and now moving to the mobile Web.

But where is this all going? How is marketing to consumers going to look in 2025 and beyond?

Today’s Trends Played Forward

Yesterday, I had the chance to catch Matt Britton’s session at Voxburner’s Youth Marketing Strategy 2017.

Britton is CEO of Crowdtap and considered to be an expert on marketing to Millennials and younger generations. His talk aimed to extrapolate out from the trends we’re seeing in those cultures a model of how the class of 2025, who’s roughly 10 years old today, will see the world.

From his point of view, the trends impacting marketing to young people in 2025 are closely tied to the socio-economic trends developing today:

  1. The key jobs will be deeply artistic or deeply scientific, and the rest will be automated. So you need to be able to do what machines can’t (art) or be able to program and build the machines youself (science and engineering).
  2. Young people are moving more and more back into cities. “The creative class is now taking over cities, and because of that, the landscape of cities are changing,” said Britton.
  3. Because people are moving into cities, they’re trading privacy and space for proximity and access. This means they need fewer things like cars. He see car buying and house buying both decreasing rapidly.
  4. People in the city without a car tend to prefer to have things delivered. “Amazon is destroying retail,” he said, and a big reason why is that young people are in the cities and they no longer have the car to drive to stores and shop conveniently in-person. It’s just much easier to stay home and have it delivered.

Consumers of the futureThat all will continue to put pressure on retail, according to Britton, but it will also feed into different consumption habits. Living in the city is more experience-based — collect less stuff, do more things. So he sees commerce moving further from buying things and toward buying services or experiences. Services like Ikea’s newly acquired handyman gig company Task Rabbit, or sites like GTFO Flights that let you get as far as way as possible as cheaply as possible.

A Post-Text World? Stick It In Your Ear

So that’s the mentality shift, but Britton also sees extreme changes coming to how people buy as well.

“Will we even need screens,” asks Bitton? “Amazon says no.”