Optimizing Your Video: Expert Answers to 10 Important Questions

Marketing is pivotal to increasing the virality of your video content. Businesses are using video more as a integral part of their marketing mix. However, what good is video if no one knows where to find it? You can spend a million dollars producing the most cinematic 30 seconds of your career and only get 20 views on YouTube if you don’t optimize the video. In this post, digital marketing specialists Jose Victor Castellanos and John D. Saunders from Unity Digital Marketing, took the time to answer some very important questions on optimizing video.

Marketing is pivotal to increasing the virality of your video content.

Businesses are using video more as a integral part of their marketing mix.

However, what good is video if no one knows where to find it?

You can spend a million dollars producing the most cinematic 30 seconds of your career and only get 20 views on YouTube if you don’t optimize the video. In this post, digital marketing specialists Jose Victor Castellanos and John D. Saunders from Unity Digital Marketing, took the time to answer some very important questions on optimizing video.

Q. Why is it important to optimize video once you’ve posted it on YouTube or your website?
A. Catellanos: “Because the Search Engines are designed to read and index HTML on web pages, not electronic files (video). Video without a title and description will not index well on the Google and Yahoo search engines

Q. How do you properly backlink your videos, podcasts and screencasts?
A. Catellanos: YouTube has a feature in the Video Manager drop down when you edit the video known as Annotations. This feature is excellent for maximizing your video’s marketability, so be sure to read this section carefully.

Q. Is it important to use proper grammar and spelling? Is it okay to abbreviate or use acronyms?
A. Saunders: Proper spelling is crucial. If you have misspelled a word, the search engine’s may not find your video. Perform a spell check, and have someone else read what you’ve written.

Q. What happens if you have a broken link for your video?
A. Catellanos: In the event that you have a video posted on your website that was embedded from YouTube, once you delete that video from YouTube, you should replace it with another video. (Don’t forget to remove the code.) If someone is searching for video on your website and they aren’t able to view it, they may leave or “bounce.” The Bounce Rate is something that can greatly affect your ranking. A little maintenance will go a long way.

Q. What does the Google Keyword Planner do and how is that different from the YouTube Keyword Tool?
A. Catellanos: Google’s Keyword Planner is geared for Google searches. YouTube’s Keyword tool is just for searching within YouTube. When you are filling out the description use the keywords most used in Google. This will get better results unless you are looking for a YouTube following.

Q. Is it necessary to include a location or your geo targeted market?
A. Catellanos: “Only if you are a small business that wants to do business locally or within a certain area. Be careful if your target market is worldwide or nation wide, posting your immediate area can limit you.

Q. Does the number of times that you use a keyword make a difference? What is the proper amount and does the length of content matter?
A. Saunders: The number of times a keyword is used can be vital to the success of any video marketing. Your keyword should be included in your title as well as your description. Your keywords should take up approximately 3 percent of the text. Be careful not to overload your content with the keyword too much.

Q. Does refreshing your content help?
A. Catellanos: “This can depend on what you are doing. Sometimes updating the content can cause the search engines to think it’s new, and therefore longevity and amount of interest (number of views) tends to give you seniority in the search ranks. Be cautious when updating if you take down a video or replace it with something new.

Q. Is it important to title your video exactly the way someone would search for it on Google?
A. Catellanos: Yes. The closest you can come to how someone would be looking for your product or service the better. Exact matches heed better results.

Q: If you get penalized as being a spammer, can that affect how Google ranks you in other areas of the Internet?
A. Saunders: Yes, you can be flagged and they can block your YouTube account. They can also put blocks on other social media sites that you are associated with.

If you’re going to spend time and money creating your videos and you want to make the best use of them, follow these guidelines and your video marketing will be far more useful. You want to remember that it’s a video, not text. Search engines are designed to read text not watch a video. While it’s great to create video it’s only effective if you have the video optimized.

12 Overlooked Ways to Help Your Video Rank Higher on YouTube

YouTube is currently the second largest search engine on the Internet. With 1 billion unique monthly visitors watching YouTube videos, enabling your marketing videos to rank higher can lead to more people discovering you, drive traffic to your website or landing pages, build your mailing list, and sell more products and services. There are a dozen often overlooked ways you

YouTube is currently the second largest search engine on the Internet. With 1 billion unique monthly visitors watching YouTube videos, enabling your marketing videos to rank higher can lead to more people discovering you, drive traffic to your website or landing pages, build your mailing list, and sell more products and services. There are a dozen often overlooked ways you can help your video rank higher on YouTube, and today we’ll quickly dissect them.

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

Today you’ll learn how these steps will help your video rank higher on YouTube.

  • The importance of encouraging viewers to add your video to their playlists and how that builds social signals
  • Why you need an authoritative YouTube channel
  • Uploading new videos regularly helps you rank higher
  • Monitor and reply to comments promptly
  • Ideas to get more video views
  • Create quality content so your viewers watch more of your videos
  • Annotations can help keep viewers on your video
  • Using “in video programming” to showcase other videos
  • Why “Likes” are a good thing (and how to get more)
  • Why you should embed your videos on websites, blogs, articles or even a press release
  • and more

If you have additional tips to add to this list of strategies to make videos rank higher on YouTube, please share them in the comments section below.

If you missed it, check out our last blog post: “Top 10 Ways to Improve YouTube Video Search Ranking.”

Top 10 Ways to Improve YouTube Video Search Ranking

YouTube recently announced reaching a new milestone of 1 billion unique monthly visitors, or 15 percent of the planet. Those kinds of numbers are why you want your videos to be found organically on YouTube. Today, we turn the subject to inbound video direct marketing and how to attract traffic to your videos on YouTube. You’ll learn about 10 tools

YouTube recently announced reaching a new milestone of 1 billion unique monthly visitors, or 15 percent of the planet. Those kinds of numbers are why you want your videos to be found organically on YouTube. Today, we turn the subject to inbound video direct marketing and how to attract traffic to your videos on YouTube. You’ll learn about 10 tools that can lead to clicks to your landing page and the opportunity for you to convert that video viewer into a paying customer. Using these tools, you can:

  • Drive traffic to your website or landing page
  • Build your mailing list
  • And sell your products or services

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

There are several factors that will influence how your video will rank on YouTube, or if it will make the “related videos” or “recommended videos” list. Today’s video suggests ten of those factors, such as:

  • How speech-to-text conversion technology means you need to use your keywords in your voice-over script
  • The importance of including your transcript for closed captioning (with broader implications of improving your search ranking)
  • Loading your description with long-form direct marketing copy
  • Encouraging social signals, and more

Today’s list is just the beginning, and in our next blog, we’ll dive even deeper into some of the often overlooked tactics that can help your video rank higher on YouTube.

If you’ve identified tools and techniques that have helped your videos rise to the top in YouTube rankings, please share them below so other direct marketers can learn what’s worked for you.

YouTube vs. Vimeo: Learn From Our Promotional Hiccup

No one likes a hiccup in their promotion—especially when you expected your message to spread virally on Facebook, but it wouldn’t as easily. More frustrating? It wasn’t a Facebook problem, but the inability to choose an acceptable thumbnail frame on YouTube that would satisfy Facebook’s advertising rules. The solution? Use Vimeo and YouTube and leverage the strength of both. It’s less than convenient, but using both services enabled us to use the best of both worlds

No one likes a hiccup in their promotion—especially when you expected your message to spread virally on Facebook, but it wouldn’t as easily. More frustrating? It wasn’t a Facebook problem, but the inability to choose an acceptable thumbnail frame on YouTube that would satisfy Facebook’s advertising rules. The solution? Use Vimeo and YouTube and leverage the strength of both. It’s less than convenient, but using both services enabled us to use the best of both worlds.

We’re in the midst of a short video test for a performing arts organization. We’ve started a contest using short video clips as a way to introduce new music to the fan base, build engagement and ultimately sell concert tickets to a series of performances in mid-April.

In today’s blog, we’ve described an issue that arose for our first video when we posted it on Facebook. It didn’t really hurt the campaign, but rather, reduced our viral reach. Fortunately, we had alternatives and we figured out how to fix the issue for our second video. This is learning that will be important to you if you plan to post videos on Facebook and use promoted posts and pay-per-click advertising to generate more traffic to the video.

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

We’ve used promoted posts in the past. Based on our use of Facebook promoted posts last Christmas, and the fact that Christmas show ticket sales were up 20 percent over a year earlier, we believe those promoted posts contributed to the sales increase. And we certainly know that using promoted posts grew our number of fans.

When we posted our first video in this series for the April Shows, we used the promoted post option as we’ve done before. But this time, a few hours later, we received an email notification from Facebook that the promoted post wasn’t approved.

We figured out the reason, and it was that our thumbnail video image had too much text on it to meet Facebook promoted post standards. With YouTube hosting the video, you have little flexibility over the thumbnail image you want. The ability to choose an image is important if you want to use paid promoted posts on Facebook. If you want to promote a post, Facebook requires 80 percent or more of the image to be a photograph or other graphic treatment, and only 20 percent text.

While Facebook still included the video on our page and it was visible and played for our fans, it meant our post would not be promoted to friends of fans.

Thankfully there is an alternative in Vimeo. Vimeo allows the user to choose the exact frame from the video you want to appear when the video isn’t playing. So for our second video, a frame was created where the text was less than 20 percent of the image.

Facebook approved the promoted post, which enabled us to also create a pay-per-click advertising program. In the meantime, the video was also posted on YouTube, which we use for the video on our landing page.

Learn more in today’s video about our experience. We also describe in more detail the pros and cons of YouTube vs. Vimeo.

In the meantime, please share your comments, suggestions and experiences. We’re all learning here together, and we hope you’re enjoying the ride.

5 E-Marketing Lessons from Social Media News Links

“The stories and issues that gain traction in social media differ substantially from those that lead in the mainstream press,” says the Pew Research Center‘s Project for Excellence in Journalism in a recent study, expanded here on Journalism.org. “But they also differ greatly from each other.” These differences highlight traits in these mediums that e-marketers must understand to effectively market through social media channels.

“The stories and issues that gain traction in social media differ substantially from those that lead in the mainstream press,” says the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism in a recent study, expanded here on Journalism.org. “But they also differ greatly from each other.” These differences highlight traits in these mediums that e-marketers must understand to effectively market through social media channels.

1. “Bloggers gravitated toward stories that elicited emotion, concerned individual or group rights, or triggered ideological passion,” according to Pew’s report on the study. Obviously this highlights the partisan boil of recent U.S. politics, but it also exhibits what bloggers want: something to talk about. To have a marketing or PR campaign picked up in the same way, it has to be a conversation starter, something that inspires bloggers and their readers to comment. If you’re going to feed bloggers, make sure there’s meat on the bones.

2. Bloggers gravitate toward newsy items more than opinions. According to Jounalism.org’s expanded report, 83 percent of the news items bloggers link to are news reports, and only 13 percent are opinion pieces. This makes sense when you consider that bloggers want to voice their own opinions on subjects, and are therefore more likely to pick up stories that report — or publicize — core facts about which they can pontificate. Your own opinionated items tend to speak for themselves, and could get picked up by bloggers more to argue against than discuss.

3. For Twitter users, “the mission is primarily about passing along important — often breaking — information in a way that unifies or assumes shared values within the Twitter community.” Twitter is known for its discussions, but it’s not a great discussion space. Updates are fast, widespread, easy to ignore and perfect for passing on actionable information: “Company X is giving away free thingamajigs! LINK. #YourCompany.”

4. YouTube’s “most watched videos have a strong sense of serendipity. They pique interest and curiosity with a strong visual appeal. The ‘Hey, you’ve got to see this,’ mentality rings strong.” However, videos don’t have to be funny or outrageous. Outrageousness can seem like the only videos that go viral because that’s what shows on the web and TV (“Web Soup,” “Tosh.0”) make famous. But any video that’s really interesting can go viral and drive sales. Companies like Dynomighty Design have had success driving whole product campaigns with simple videos showing how cool their products are, such as this video for the company’s magnetic jewelry.

5. “Across all three social platforms … attention spans are brief.” This goes both for the length of the message and the length of time it’ll remain relevant. The majority of top stories remained top stories for no more than three days, especially on Twitter. The study also found that social media picked stories up much more quickly than traditional media. Combined, these traits mean lift can be short from any one message. A marketing or PR message delivered on Sunday and picked up by Tuesday will likely lose its buzz before the weekend.