What Do Customers Really Want? Google Analytics Can Help You Find the Answers

Do you truly know your online customers? If you answered “yes” but don’t use Google Analytics, then you might easily be mistaken. Your website might bring in quantifiable numbers of customers — and it could be responsive on mobile devices while satisfying the basic criteria of good SEO — but what about the performance metrics you can’t see?

How to Drive Your Customer's Lifecycle to Increase Revenue and Retention

Do you truly know your online customers? If you answered “yes” but don’t use Google Analytics, then you might easily be mistaken. Your website might bring in quantifiable numbers of customers — and it could be responsive on mobile devices while satisfying the basic criteria of good SEO — but what about the performance metrics you can’t see? What about dissatisfied visitors who bounce within seconds, or the folks who fail to convert after placing items in their online shopping carts?

And what about the willing, eager shoppers who you’re completely missing out on? What if your audience doesn’t care about half of your blog posts, PPC ads or Facebook updates? It’s easy to get excited about new leads and sales from online marketing. Too often, though, business owners and novice marketers leave money on the table by failing to look deeper into their websites and marketing efforts.

In short, they fail to ask: “Am I honestly reaching my customers?”

You can find answers to this question with Google Analytics, a free service that offers near endless amounts of data about how people interact with your website. Follow the data, and you’ll eventually learn what your customers really want. Then, and only then, will your business fully benefit from your website and marketing efforts. Here, we’ll dig deeper into how Google Analytics can help you learn more about your customers.

Why Do People Visit Your Website?

You’ve probably heard the terms “advertising funnel” or “conversion funnel” thrown around. In marketing, “funnel” is the term that describes a consumer’s journey toward becoming a customer.

It might begin with someone searching Google for cheap men’s running shoes, then clicking a sponsored result from Nike and ordering shoes online. That said, funnels can also be more complex. The same person might see a blog post on Facebook written by a local running store. He then follows the blog and reads new posts over the next few weeks. Eventually, he clicks through to the running store’s website from a link in the blog post, and he ends up buying a new set of trainers.

Author: Phil Frost

Phil is Founder and COO of Main Street ROI. Phil leads the company’s operations and is primary creator of Main Street ROI’s marketing training programs. He is an expert in search engine marketing, website analytics, and sales funnel optimization. Phil’s marketing thought leadership has been published on Forbes.com, Inc.com, MSN.com, and many other major business media outlets.

Phil earned his Master of Engineering Management degree from Thayer School of Engineering and Tuck School of Business and his Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Engineering degrees from Dartmouth College. While attending Dartmouth, Phil started every game on the varsity football team as the defensive safety.

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One thought on “What Do Customers Really Want? Google Analytics Can Help You Find the Answers”

  1. Thanks for a very thoughtful and useful piece, Phil. And it is a great, deservedly so, native commercial for Google Analytics.

    Just one thought:

    You write, ” Did certain advertising funnels convert more significant numbers of visitors? And, if so, then what did those funnels have in common?”

    Where Google Analytics ends (relative conversion percentages, for example) the real bottom line metric analysis must begin. I would submit that in addition to the issues you mention, such as ‘which funnel converts better’ I would add the need for analysis of the ultimate profitability of one conversion compared to another.

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